Gold Coast beachside shack to go under the hammer after 46 years with one owner

first_imgRay White Broadbeach agent Troy Fitzgerald outside 20 Riviera Rd, Miami. Picture: Jerad WilliamsA GOLD Coast beachside shack, on the market after 46 years with one owner, is expected to fetch a seven-digit dollar figure at auction next month.The home is likely to attract plenty of buyer interest and a high sale price – given that it’s now almost impossible to find a house east of the Gold Coast Highway for less than a $1 million.Ray White Broadbeach marketing agent Troy Fitzgerald, who is taking the Miami property to auction on April 1, said the suburb was “a little bit understated”.“That pocket has got a lot of growth still,” he said. “It is the first of that type of property to be on the market in years, and it’s going to set a bit of a benchmark on other properties in the area.”The two-bedroom Miami shack hasn’t changed much. This was taken around 1971 when Gweneth and George Dean bought the property. Her children in the photo are now 50 and 52.Brisbane-based vendors Gweneth and George Dean bought the Miami property in 1971 for just $6500.“We had always holidayed in Burleigh Heads and we had another holiday house there,” 80-year-old Mrs Dean said.“During the 1971 Christmas break I happened to see a property in Riviera Rd, Miami, advertised for $6500 which I felt was worth investigating.” 20 Riviera Rd, Miami.More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North10 hours ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa1 day agoMrs Dean said the family used to visit Burleigh Heads fortnightly and were initially attracted to the vibe of the area.“Burleigh was always a very family orientated area,” she said.“It got to a stage where we looked upon ourselves as being half local. You knew every second person you’d meet along the street.”But she said the demographic had now changed with new developments and a younger crowd moving in.“It’s now probably more tourist orientated and there’s very few of the older residents left.” she said.20 Riviera Rd, Miami in the 1970s.Since they bought 20 Riviera Rd, the Deans have only painted the property.“The last (and current) tenancy contract was signed in 2000 and although there were occasional changes of individuals the present tenant has been there since 2004,” Ms Dean said.“We have never lost a week’s rent in that time.”Mrs Dean acknowledged the property might be snapped up by developers due to its medium-density zoning and proximity to the beach.“We assumed that might happen and that’s one of the reasons we didn’t do a lot of work on it,” she said.What else you could buy in 1971?23 inch TV, $20Vegemite 4oz, 22c (113 grams)Fridge, $39Lip stick, 69cAjax washing power 20oz, 39c (566g)1964 Holden Station Wagon, $1045 20 Riviera Rd, Miami.The 536sq m block, just 200m from the beach, included an old two-bedroom weatherboard house which was built in the 1930s.“We bought it purely as an investment as we used the Burleigh house whenever we were down,” Mrs Dean said.“The area was very quiet. The house was called ‘Tween Hills’ as it was directly ‘between the hills’ of North Burleigh and Miami/ Nobby.”Highly sought-after Riviera Rd is a mix of unit blocks and luxury homes including the highest-seller – a four-bedroom home at No. 13. Riviera connects the Gold Coast Highway with popular Marine Pde.last_img read more

Lakers injury updates: LeBron James, Anthony Davis expected to play on Christmas vs. Clippers

first_imgMORE: SN’s NBA Athlete of the DecadeBoth James and Davis were listed as questionable on Monday for the Christmas showdown with the Clippers, but the All-Star forwards pushed for an impromptu practice on Christmas Eve, per Wojnarowski and McMenamin. Practice time has been hard to find for coach Frank Vogel, as the Lakers have played 12 of their last 16 games on the road. There won’t be any talk of load management in Los Angeles on Christmas Day.Lakers stars LeBron James and Anthony Davis are expected to play on Wednesday against the Clippers, according to ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski and Dave McMenamin. James missed a game for the first time this season on Sunday with a thoracic muscle strain and discomfort in his groin; Davis hurt his right knee in that game, a 128-104 loss to the Nuggets. “We went a 10-day trip without a single practice, really,” Vogel told reporters on Monday. “One shootaround, I think. Sometimes that benefits your legs, but usually it leads to a little bit of slippage in your execution and togetherness, particularly on the defensive end.”🎥 Frank Vogel gives an injury update for LeBron and AD. pic.twitter.com/DtsKBUgsRZ— Los Angeles Lakers (@Lakers) December 23, 2019The Lakers stand alone at the top of the Western Conference standings with a 24-6 record, but a three-game losing streak has allowed contenders like the Nuggets (21-8), Rockets (21-9) and Clippers (22-10) to close the gap. The Lakers will need to fire on all cylinders to defeat the Clippers, who won the first battle of LA on Opening Night without Paul George.George will be part of the starting five this time, joining Kawhi Leonard on the Staples Center floor. Leonard sat out Sunday’s game against the Thunder, but the 2019 NBA Finals MVP is available for the Christmas Day contest.last_img read more

‘One more game’

first_imgGinebra will have the momentum to go for the kill, and Cone has hinted that he will prepare his boys to play just one more game.“Our mentality right now is we want to play just one more game,” Cone said after Game 5 of the best-of-seven series. Slaughter was the other big performer for Cone and showed why he is the Best Player of the Conference, finishing with 17 points, 16 rebounds and six swats.Meralco had only five blocks for the night.“I am looking forward to playing in a bigger game,” Slaughter said of Game 6, which will also be at Philippine Arena. “Whoever comes out hungrier for that game will get that game.”Meralco trailed by as many as 18 in the first half before coming back hard in the third period to lead a couple of times. But, like in Game 2, the Bolts suffered a power outage in the most critical time of the game, making just two Allen Durham free throws in a five-minute span.Durham has also been working double time in trying to keep the Bolts in this series, and whether he’s got more to give for two more games will ultimately determine whether Meralco finally breaks through in the pros.ADVERTISEMENT Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games After five grueling games of the PBA Governors’ Cup Finals, and considering how he has worked himself ragged to help give Barangay Ginebra a 3-2 lead over Meralco, Justin Brownlee says he’s still got a lot left in the tank as the Gin Kings gun for the clincher on Wednesday night.“No, not at all,” the 6-foot-5 Brownlee said when asked if he was surprised that coach Tim Cone didn’t give him a breather in the second half of a tight 85-74 victory on Sunday before 36,455 fans at Philippine Arena in Bocaue, Bulacan.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES “I just have to be prepared,” Cone went on, before someone asked if he was ready to go the full 48 minutes—at least—in Game 6 where the Kings can sew up a repeat. “I’m ready to do whatever it takes for us to win a championship.”Brownlee played 46 total minutes in Game 5 and struggled throughout with the Meralco defense focusing on him hard.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutBut he delivered when needed by helping in the other aspects in the stretch, as he still finished with 20 points that went with 12 rebounds and five assists. Brownlee also had a night-high three steals—equaling the entire Meralco total—which resulted in a Greg Slaughter bucket that made it 81-70 going into the final 4:30.“Our job’s not done yet,” Brownlee said. Milliam posts rare PPS 3-title romp Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Read Next CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa MOST READ Kin of Misamis Oriental hero cop to get death benefits, award — PNP Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort View commentslast_img read more

March 6 2000 After a winter drought the daily pr

first_imgMarch 6, 2000After a winter drought, the daily progress today is that it is raining! Joy, tothe rain! Allen, who cooks in theArcosanti Cafe , stands beside a water harvesting vessel. Photo by: DoctressNeutopialast_img

Writer Maggie OFarrell has survived some terrifyi

first_imgWriter Maggie O’Farrell has survived some terrifying episodes. She’s had a machete pressed to her throat during a robbery, once contracted amoebic dysentery while traveling and nearly bled out while giving birth to her first child.All told, O’Farrell says she has experienced 17 different brushes with death — each of which she details in her new memoir, I Am, I Am, I Am. The book was inspired, in part, by O’Farrell’s daughter, who was born with severe eczema and life-threatening allergies. O’Farrell says she wanted to understand what happens to people when they come “back from the brink.””These experiences always take up residence inside us,” she says. “We’re different people afterwards. We’re wiser, we’re a little bit sadder — but also we value what we have.”Interview Highlights On a frightening incident that happened when she was 18 and working at a retreat in a mountain valley I was on this walk … and I realized I had seen [a man] further down the valley, and I still don’t know how he got ahead of me to intercept me on the way up, and so I walked past him and then he came after me. And he said he wanted to show me a bird on the lake, and so he put his binocular strap around my neck, and I knew, as everybody does, that it wasn’t right, it wasn’t true, it wasn’t just about the bird, and I knew he meant to harm me. … I think there is a kind of almost animal instinct, a bit like dogs sniffing each other; you know that somebody means you harm.So I talked my way out of it. I just ducked out under the binocular strap and I talked to him and I kept him talking and I asked him about the birds and I knew that the only way I could save myself — because he was a lot bigger than me and he was a lot stronger than me — the only way to get out of there was to use my brain instead. …[Police] didn’t tell me anything, but they asked me about the incident in very close detail and then asked me to look at some photographs and to say if I saw the person with the binoculars among these photographs, which I did, and I pointed him out. I knew what had happened. I could sense it, and I said to them, “He has killed someone, hasn’t he?” And they wouldn’t tell me anything, but then a few days later I read in the newspaper that a girl had been killed, that she had been raped and then strangled and then buried not very far from where I had been walking.On overhearing a nurse say she was going to die when she was hospitalized with encephalitis, a virus in her cerebellum, at age 8 As a child nobody tells you things. All the conversation about you and your illness and your symptoms and your prospects are all done elsewhere — they’re all told to your parents when you’re not in the room. So you have to become this person who picks up on things. You’ve got to look at … the facial expressions of the people looking after you, your parents and the nurses and the doctors, you’ve got to try and interpret the silences around you, what people are saying and what they’re not saying.And so hearing from this nurse in the corridor mistakenly let slip that I was expected to die, I think that was the biggest shock to me. When I heard it, I knew it in a sense. It didn’t come as a huge shock, but it made everything that was happening around me suddenly made sense. I thought, “Of course. Of course I’m dying. How did I not realize that?” …You couldn’t hear that and not be changed by it. And then when I didn’t die they said I wouldn’t walk again, that I would lead a life of incapacity. And so for whatever reason, I managed to find a loophole out of both of those destinies that were mapped out for me. So I’ve always felt, really, since then, or I’ve grown up with this sense that I lived this almost charmed existence, that I managed to hoodwink these two paths in life, and almost as if I’m living on borrowed time or extra time. … I’ve always been really filled with the idea that I must make the most of it and I must live the biggest and the broadest life I possibly can, because it’s been a gift twice over.On nearly bleeding out during the birth of her first child I labored for three days — three very long days and nights, I would like to say — and after three days the baby’s heartrate was dipping and it was showing signs of distress. So I said I really need to talk to a doctor. … And the doctor who came to my bedside was the very same doctor who I had seen all those months before who had been so rude to me, and so I begged for a cesarean. … And he did grant me a cesarean, but he said it would go down on my notes as medically unnecessary and thought I was being hysterical and lying.So basically what happened in the operation was that because the labor had gone on for so long, my son had got jammed in an immovable position and so they had to kind of wrestle to get him out, poor child. And during that something must’ve ruptured because I started hemorrhaging and started losing blood. This is quite graphic, all my intestines came out. Everything came out of my abdomen, so they had to try to get it all back in again, and stop the bleeding and it was all going pretty badly wrong.On staying calm when her daughter is experiencing a life-threatening allergic reactionThe most useful thing that someone told me — and this is a friend of mine who actually is a play therapist, so she’s trained to play with children in hospital — and [what] she said to me is, “What you have to remember is that your emotions and your daughter’s emotions are on a loop. So whatever you’re feeling … she is feeling — and vice-versa. … If she is terrified and panicking, you need to be calm, because whatever calm and confidence you exude, she will pick up, because it’s all in a loop.”And that’s one of the single best pieces of advice I ever had on being a parent to a child with additional needs, that you’ve got to hang onto that.Therese Madden and Thea Chaloner produced and edited this interview for broadcast. Bridget Bentz, Molly Seavy-Nesper and Scott Hensley adapted it for the Web. Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.last_img read more

This year malaria got a cool new cartoon Aardman

first_imgThis year, malaria got a cool new cartoon. Aardman Animations, creator of the popular “Wallace and Gromit” claymation films, and actor Hugh Laurie teamed up for a 2-minute video on the history of this disease, which claims 450,000 lives a year. It’s called “Malaria Must Die, So Millions Can Live.” And it stars “Mozzie the Mosquito.”It’s very clever. And accurate. But some malaria specialists are actually more impressed with a 1943 anti-malaria video, produced by Walt Disney for the U.S. government and starring the Seven Dwarfs.The 10-minute film explains how malaria is spread — and how it might be stopped. And it’s surprisingly relevant in 2018.”I gotta say, it was a very well-done video,” says Daniel Sledge, an associate professor of Political Science at the University of Texas, Arlington.”It’s very practical,” he says. “Avoiding standing water is really critical. Screening windows is really critical.”In his research, Sledge has focused on malaria control and eradication in the United States, particularly before 1950.The Disney video details many of the important measures Americans took to protect themselves from malaria, he says: getting rid of standing water, screening windows, papering over cracks in the walls, even weeding ponds and lakes to make it easier for fish to eat mosquito larvae.Most of the things they describe are “really, honestly, best practices,” he says.Lessons for todayBut not everything in the video holds up. Coating standing water in oil to prevent mosquitoes from breeding, for instance, would ruin drinking water in addition to causing environmental damage. And in many places, it’s impossible to weed the vast bodies of water where mosquitoes breed.In the film, Bashful happily pumps clouds of green insecticide over a lake. “A thin film of Paris green is strong enough to kill the wigglers [mosquito larvae], but won’t kill the fish,” the narrator confidently explains. Paris green was an insecticide used mainly in the 1940s but was soon replaced by the more powerful DDT. DDT, of course, has been banned in many countries for its environmental and health side effects.Spraying with insecticides still plays a role in preventing malaria, especially in Africa. The insecticides — including, in some countries, DDT — are sprayed on the walls of homes, where some mosquitoes rest after feeding.Other techniques shown in the video are still widely used.”Bed nets, certainly,” says William Moss, professor of epidemiology, international health and molecular microbiology and immunology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.Moss’s expertise is in malaria control in sub-Saharan Africa. While malaria still exists in many parts of the world, including Asia and Latin America, it is most deadly in Africa. About 90 percent of the yearly deaths happen there, Moss points out.Bed nets treated with insecticides are perhaps the most widely used method to prevent the spread of malaria, Moss says. “Millions and millions of nets have been distributed throughout sub-Saharan Africa in the past decade,” he says, calling them a “cornerstone” of malaria control.”That’s had an important impact on reducing numbers of infections and child mortality,” Moss says. Indeed, the treated bed nets have reduced child deaths — from all causes, not just malaria — by 20 percent, the CDC says.Moss also highlighted the importance of getting rid of standing water and making home improvements to prevent malaria.”If you close the open eaves and put screens on [windows], that can have a major impact,” he says. He says these techniques may be hard to apply on a wide scale in sub-Saharan Africa. “But it is an important strategy,” he adds.In the 21st century there are other tactics critical to treating malaria and preventing its spread — notably diagnostic tests and new medications to treat the disease.How cartoons help malaria controlThe Disney video comes in two languages, English and Spanish, so it’s likely that Latin America was a target audience in addition to the U.S., where malaria was still a problem in many parts in 1943.Regardless of its intended audience, Sledge says, “the Disney video was very well-done and probably had very high-quality technical advisers.””Slightly updated, it would be very useful,” he adds — for preventing not just malaria but other diseases as well, such as dengue, West Nile, yellow fever and Zika.The fun, sometimes silly animation seems to lighten the mood and make the instructions more fun to follow. After all, when it comes to fixing up a house yourself, sometimes you might feel a little Dopey or Grumpy.”It has a broad appeal,” Moss says. The video reminded him to Dr. Seuss’s wartime pamphlet, “Ann Drinks Blood.” Ann — short for anopheles, the type of mosquito that carries malaria — loves going out at night (“she’s a real party gal”) and drinking… GI blood. The lighthearted illustrations had a serious message: American soldiers were at risk of contracting malaria in many battlefields, but they could take steps like covering up and using bed nets to minimize their risk.Bigger pictureAs important as those measures were, however, they are mostly individual-level efforts. There are larger improvements communities and governments can make in to prevent and eradicate malaria.William Moss says there’s a sort of “philosophical divide” in addressing malaria. Some researchers focus on high-tech interventions, he says, while others believe improving socioeconomic status — especially the condition of homes — “is really critical to decreasing malaria.”For instance, in the video, a mosquito bites a poor man suffering from malaria, and transmits it to a rich man — who then falls into financial ruin because he’s unable to work.”There’s a very strong link they’re trying to make between malaria and poverty,” Moss says. Researchers often focus on the rates of mortality from malaria, he says. Perhaps focusing on the economic costs as well could prompt changes, he says.Daniel Sledge points out another crucial way the United States controlled malaria: creating county-level health departments to monitor and prevent disease outbreaks.”In the United States, we put in place high-quality local public health infrastructure, disease surveillance, things along those lines – to make sure these diseases are not a problem,” Sledge explains.The efforts outlined in the video may help individuals protect themselves and their neighbors from the disease, but some changes need to come from the top, he says.”You can do all this stuff, but if you don’t make it permanent, the disease will come back,” he says.Melody Schreiber (@m_scribe on Twitter) is a freelance journalist in Washington, D.C. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://sp2.img.hsyaolu.com.cn/wp-shlf1314/2031/IMG14559.jpg” alt=”last_img” /> read more