Rubbish Reveals Sophocles

first_imgOxford University scientists have used infra-red technology to open up a hoard of ancient papyri which could potentially reveal hundreds of lost Greek poems, tragedies and plays and bring about a ‘second Renaissance’.The collection, known as the ‘Oxyrhynchus Collection’ is the largest collection of classical manuscripts in the world. It contains over 800 boxes with more than 400,000 papyrus fragments. It is now stored in Oxford’s own Sackler library where specialists are applying the new, cutting edge imagery technology to reveal lost works by classical authors including Sophocles, Euripides, Hesiod and Lucian. The works of Sophocles, the giant of the golden age of Greek civilisation, are particularly sought after. The potential to decipher more of his works is eagerly anticipated by classicists around the world.The Oxyrhynchus Collection was excavated in the late 19th Century by members of the Egypt Exploration Society. When they were uncovered in a rubbish tip in the city, the papyri were worthless to the naked eye. They were worm-eaten and corroded. The condition in which they were found meant that since the collection was transported to Britain more than a hundred years ago (often in biscuit tins) the process of decipherment has been painfully slow.Professor Parsons of Christ Church, who has been wrestling with the Oxyrhynchus Collection for more than forty years explains, “for a long time we have been photographing the fragments by infra-red or ultra-violet light to bring up traces of ink.” Now scientists at Oxford, in collaboration with specialists from Bringham Young University in Utah, have begun applying multi-spectral imaging techniques developed from satellite technology to illegible sections of the papyri. “Multi-spectral imaging is going to produce the best results yet, since it combines digital imaging (so that the images can be enhanced by a computer) with the whole spectrum of light wave-lengths.”As the director of the Oxyrhynchus project, Dr Dirk Obbink toldCherwell that the development is “a significant discovery in that it will broaden the already substantial base of lost Greek and Latin Literature and writing in general that we have represented in the Oxyrhynchus Papyri collection in the Sackler, and in papyrus collections around the world.”When it has all been read (mainly in Greek, but also in Latin, Hebrew and other languages) up to five million new words will be added to the current body of classical works. Texts deciphered over the past week will be published next month by the Egypt Exploration Society, which owns the collection after financing its discovery over a century ago.In the past, substantial difficulties have been encountered in reading and interpreting damaged papyrus on many important projects. The Philodemus project at Herculaneum yielded several hundred rolls of text charred by the volcanic flow of Vesuvius, compressed by the weight of rubble and mud and congealed by water. Now multi-spectral techniques also promise to help retrieve this extensive library of Epicurean philosophy from the first century B.C. Classicists even believe that they are likely to be able to find and decipher lost Christian gospels, which were written at approximately the same time as the New Testament.ARCHIVE: 0th week 2005last_img read more

Man accused of armed break-in at former workplace near Middlebury

first_imgIndianaLocalNews Facebook Twitter By Jon Zimney – December 29, 2020 0 492 Facebook Google+ Pinterest WhatsApp WhatsApp Twitter Man accused of armed break-in at former workplace near Middlebury Pinterest (Photo supplied/Elkhart County Jail) A former trailer factory employee is accused of breaking back into the building and aiming a gun at another worker.Casey Balser, 24, was arrested, last week, after police were called to a factory near Middlebury.Balser first refused to hand the gun over to police, but an officer was able to detain him and place him in handcuffs.Officers allegedly found meth among the possessions he left behind after breaking in through the women’s restroom window, according to 95.3 MNC’s reporting partners at The Elkhart Truth.He’s charged with burglary, carrying and pointing a loaded gun without a license and resisting.Read more about Balser’s arrest from the original story published by The Elkhart Truth. Previous articleCity of South bend to offer free Christmas tree disposal starting next weekNext articleWarsaw Man Facing Intimidation Charge After Alleged Threats Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. Google+last_img read more

Kamyszek sticks to strict daily routine to excel for Syracuse cross-country

first_imgReed Kamyszek is always taking some sort of course.First, there are the Syracuse courses. With his biochemistry major complete, the senior concentrates on his other major, ethics and his psychology minor.Then there are the medical school applications — the top ones, this side of the Mississippi River, Kamyszek needs to stay the course and finish.And lastly, 2–3 hours per day, six days a week, he spends on an actual course as a top runner on the Syracuse men’s cross-country team. The team is ranked sixth in the nation, which prepares for the Atlantic Coast Conference championships in three weeks. Time management and organization are keys to his success because, for him, running and school are the same.When it comes to his 4.0 GPA, his NCAA Elite 89 award and an eighth overall finish in Syracuse’s most recent meet, he approaches all of these with the same mind-set and a methodical game plan.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“In cross-country, there are four or five major races during your season,” he said. “In a class, there are four or five major exams.”He admitted that the spacing of these tests might differ between the two areas, but he stressed that consistency is the biggest part.“There’s a difference between simply going to lecture and paying attention,” he said. “And the same thing goes for practice. Are you mentally up for (either)?”Every day starts at 7:25 a.m. on the same street corner, where a group of cross-country teammates get an early run in. Then comes breakfast — mostly organic food he cooks himself — before lectures, workouts, dinner, homework and 8–9 hours of sleep to finish the day.And his attention to detail was fostered at a young age.“We had high expectations. We harked on the kids, ‘My name’s attached to you, don’t mess it up,’” Kamyszek’s father, Eric, said with a laugh about his and his wife Dawn’s parenting style.In school, he consistently received top marks in the classroom and impressed athletically. In sixth grade, during a mandatory mile run for gym class, Kamyszek flew to a 5:30 time.Kamyszek dropped hockey his freshman year at Kenowa Hills High School in Michigan and went under the tutelage of Greg Meyer — who won the Boston Marathon in 1983 and before this year, was the last American to do so. Meyer trained any and all high school kids in the Grand Rapids, Michigan area.Any skill level was welcome and it was free.Kamyszek soon began dominating his conference. By junior year, he won the Division II cross-country state championship in the fall and the 2-mile event in track in the spring. He was so successful running that he began to lose, on purpose — but only to his teammates.During the regular season, he would slow up toward the end of meets and allow his teammates to pass him across the finish line. He wanted to share the spotlight and give his teammates ink in the paper.He did this because Kamyszek is only competitive with himself, not his teammates or opponents.“I don’t like to lay out what I’m going to do beforehand,” Kamyszek said when asked if he trash talks. “Everyone’s there to learn, so why would you hinder someone’s ability to do that?”This comes from the Midwestern sensibility Syracuse coach Chris Fox can’t help but mention when discussing Kamyszek.“He only does things that make sense,” he said. “He’s very calculating.”On a team-wide scale, Kamyszek said, it doesn’t matter who’s the first or fifth man because everyone has to pass the person in front of them to help the team. Especially because points matter so much, particularly in championships, and that’s where the Orange will be in just three short weeks.Until then, Kamyszek will stay on course, repeating his routine, because he knows that’s the quickest way to success.“The last thing you want to do (is get overwhelmed),” Kamyszek said. “If that happens, your work suffers — and that’s the last thing you want to happen.” Comments Published on October 15, 2014 at 12:05 am Contact Sam: [email protected] | @Sam4TR Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more