Kamyszek sticks to strict daily routine to excel for Syracuse cross-country

first_imgReed Kamyszek is always taking some sort of course.First, there are the Syracuse courses. With his biochemistry major complete, the senior concentrates on his other major, ethics and his psychology minor.Then there are the medical school applications — the top ones, this side of the Mississippi River, Kamyszek needs to stay the course and finish.And lastly, 2–3 hours per day, six days a week, he spends on an actual course as a top runner on the Syracuse men’s cross-country team. The team is ranked sixth in the nation, which prepares for the Atlantic Coast Conference championships in three weeks. Time management and organization are keys to his success because, for him, running and school are the same.When it comes to his 4.0 GPA, his NCAA Elite 89 award and an eighth overall finish in Syracuse’s most recent meet, he approaches all of these with the same mind-set and a methodical game plan.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“In cross-country, there are four or five major races during your season,” he said. “In a class, there are four or five major exams.”He admitted that the spacing of these tests might differ between the two areas, but he stressed that consistency is the biggest part.“There’s a difference between simply going to lecture and paying attention,” he said. “And the same thing goes for practice. Are you mentally up for (either)?”Every day starts at 7:25 a.m. on the same street corner, where a group of cross-country teammates get an early run in. Then comes breakfast — mostly organic food he cooks himself — before lectures, workouts, dinner, homework and 8–9 hours of sleep to finish the day.And his attention to detail was fostered at a young age.“We had high expectations. We harked on the kids, ‘My name’s attached to you, don’t mess it up,’” Kamyszek’s father, Eric, said with a laugh about his and his wife Dawn’s parenting style.In school, he consistently received top marks in the classroom and impressed athletically. In sixth grade, during a mandatory mile run for gym class, Kamyszek flew to a 5:30 time.Kamyszek dropped hockey his freshman year at Kenowa Hills High School in Michigan and went under the tutelage of Greg Meyer — who won the Boston Marathon in 1983 and before this year, was the last American to do so. Meyer trained any and all high school kids in the Grand Rapids, Michigan area.Any skill level was welcome and it was free.Kamyszek soon began dominating his conference. By junior year, he won the Division II cross-country state championship in the fall and the 2-mile event in track in the spring. He was so successful running that he began to lose, on purpose — but only to his teammates.During the regular season, he would slow up toward the end of meets and allow his teammates to pass him across the finish line. He wanted to share the spotlight and give his teammates ink in the paper.He did this because Kamyszek is only competitive with himself, not his teammates or opponents.“I don’t like to lay out what I’m going to do beforehand,” Kamyszek said when asked if he trash talks. “Everyone’s there to learn, so why would you hinder someone’s ability to do that?”This comes from the Midwestern sensibility Syracuse coach Chris Fox can’t help but mention when discussing Kamyszek.“He only does things that make sense,” he said. “He’s very calculating.”On a team-wide scale, Kamyszek said, it doesn’t matter who’s the first or fifth man because everyone has to pass the person in front of them to help the team. Especially because points matter so much, particularly in championships, and that’s where the Orange will be in just three short weeks.Until then, Kamyszek will stay on course, repeating his routine, because he knows that’s the quickest way to success.“The last thing you want to do (is get overwhelmed),” Kamyszek said. “If that happens, your work suffers — and that’s the last thing you want to happen.” Comments Published on October 15, 2014 at 12:05 am Contact Sam: [email protected] | @Sam4TR Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Justyn Knight, arguably the greatest SU runner of all time, is looking for his first individual national championship

first_img Published on November 15, 2017 at 9:48 pm Contact Matt: [email protected] In 2016, Knight missed qualifying for the Olympics by 0.1 seconds, his mother Jennifer said. That November, Tiernan beat Knight at the national championship. Come 2017, he qualified for the World Championships in the 5,000-meter. When it turned to race time, a familiar face lurked in the finals. It was Tiernan.With five laps to go, Tiernan moved into the lead, quickening the pace by two seconds. But Knight didn’t budge. He stayed with the pack, gradually chasing down the man that beat him a year earlier.Tiernan couldn’t maintain his pace, and Knight only sped up, inching closer and closer. Knight finished in ninth place in his first appearance on the world stage. Tiernan took 11th.“If he doesn’t win,” former SU runner Martin Hehir said, “he’s just going to come back with a vengeance.Knight’s talent matches his flare to make him one of the most well-known runners in the world. As one of the nation’s most dominant athletes, he’s commanded attention from everyone, including his teammates. They want to run with him.Everyone’s always wanted to run with him.When the St. Michael Catholic (Ontario, Canada) High School runner was just beginning to rise to local stardom, his head coach, Frank Bergin, found him waiting at the track after practice. Everyone else was gone, and Bergin was on his way out, but Knight was waiting for two kids from the nearby elementary school, who couldn’t have been older than 11, Bergin said. The two had seen Knight run and asked him to run a lap with them after school. So Knight waited and ran with them.“I remember just going ‘wow.’” Bergin said. “That’s Justyn.”Once Knight arrived on Syracuse’s campus two years later, he made an immediate impact, running in the national championship his true freshman season.By his sophomore season in 2015, Knight emerged as one of the best runners in the country. Hehir had always been the runner that teammates modeled themselves after. Soon, even for Hehir, that runner became Knight.Andy Mendes | Digital Design EditorOne of the reasons that Hehir excelled so much as a senior, Smith said, was because Knight took the pressure off Hehir and let him run freely.“Justin’s transformed the program and he’s taken us to a place where we couldn’t have been without him,” Hehir said. “That’s meant a lot for the program and for the future of the program.”The pair, along with emerging star Colin Bennie, led Syracuse to its first national championship in 64 years. When Bennie arrived at campus, like many, he copied Hehir’s model. But in 2015, he mimicked Knight.“Justyn being the guy to keep with,” Bennie’s mother Lisa said, “is the best training situation Colin could be in.”The entire time Knight trained for worlds, he checked on his teammate’s summer training, Jennifer said. In between workouts this summer in Vaughan, Ontario, Knight’s phone would be littered with messages from younger runners asking how his training was going, but also asking questions about their own training and how to prepare for the fall.Syracuse head coach Chris Fox traveled to London this summer for Knight’s race. As soon as it was over, Knight found his coach.“‘Let’s get ready for cross-country,’” he said to Fox.Throughout this season, Knight has worked to ensure his teammates are ready to battle at NCAAs. He sets the tones in workouts, checks in on how his teammates train and recover and takes on his own coaching responsibilities as the team’s leader. All his preparations have lined up for this Saturday, when Knight has one final attempt at a cross-country crown. “I think it’s a pretty fitting final chapter for him to put his mark on,” Hehir said. “The fact that he hasn’t won a title yet chomps this up to make it even sweeter. It could be a storybook ending.”Knight loves the pressure and the spotlight, but he’s had to adjust to it. Being the favorite is something he’s struggled with in the past. After he rose to prominence in 2015, the lights shined brighter and the microphones in his face multiplied. He felt overwhelmed. But he’s learned to embrace it and use the added attention to take the pressure off of his team.No matter the finish, Saturday’s race will bring an end to the greatest cross-country career a Syracuse runner has ever had.“I’m 30 years old and I don’t think that I will ever have another Justyn in my coaching career,” Smith said. “He is a once in a lifetime talent.”And on Saturday afternoon, he can capture the one thing that’s eluded him. Comments For two years, across three seasons, Justyn Knight couldn’t beat Oregon’s Edward Cheserek. No one could. Cheserek, or “the King” as he was called, finished his college career as a 17-time national champion in 21 possible events. But, at the cross-country national championship last year, Knight finished ahead of him.Then he ran into another problem: Villanova’s Patrick Tiernan. Knight prefers a sit-and-kick type race, where the runners don’t burn themselves out during the race, but then sprint ahead at the end. Tiernan set the pace that day, and made sure he didn’t let Knight kick. Instead, he burned the last mile, forcing Knight to chase, preventing a strong kick.“Sometimes you have your day,” Syracuse assistant coach Adam Smith said, “and that day was Tiernan’s day.”Cheserek and Tiernan were both experienced runners in their last year of eligibility. Knight was one of the favorites, but not the favorite. In all cross-country disciplines, outdoor and indoor track, Knight has had his share of chances to claim an individual national title, but hasn’t won one yet.Knight is the best runner in Syracuse history, with two top-five finishes in three years at the national championship. When Knight began his college career, Syracuse was a middle-of-the-pack finisher at nationals, unable to get over the hump. Knight turned the team into a perennial top-three team and national champion in 2015. He has carried the program on his back while making his teammates better. But he has never captured an individual cross-country championship. On Saturday, he has one final opportunity to do it.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I don’t go into any race racing for second,” Knight said.center_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

What Cars do BiH National Team Players drive? (gallery)

first_img[wzslider autoplay=”true”]BiH national football team players are known as lovers of fast and amazing cars. Their budget allows them to be lovers of such cars, so it is not surprising that they do not save money on their rolling stock.Player of the Italian Roma Edin Džeko bought Porsche Panamera which costs around 150.000 EUR while he was still in England. He also drives a Bentley Continental worth almost 350.000 EUR.Young Muhamed Bešić celebrated the last summer’s transfer from the Hungarian Ferencvárosi to Everton by buying Lamborghini Huracan worth around 200.000 EUR.Miralem Pjanić finds his way through the crowds in the capital of Italy in his sports Audi RS3 Sportback worth around 50.000 EUR.Goalkeeper of the BiH national teal Asmir Begović stated last year that the most expensive thing he ever bought was the Ferrari California. Asmir earlier drove Mercedes E Class AMG, as well as the sponsoring JEEP Grand Cherokee, which he was given to use free of charge.(Source: radiosarajevo.ba/photo: avaz.ba, reprezentacija.ba)last_img read more

Finance Minister rules out Christmas bonus for public servants

first_imgPublic servants hoping for a bonus this Christmas will be left disappointed, as Finance Minister Winston Jordan on Friday ruled out any bonus pay-out to State workers due to limited fiscal space.In his revelation to the media, Jordan explained that countrywide infrastructure projects are ongoing. As such, he argued that because of these projects, money isFinance Minister Winston Jordanbeing circulated back into the economy.“I can tell you that it will not happen this year,” the Minister said when asked about bonus for public servants. “The challenges are many and the resources are few.”In the absence of a bonus, Jordan explained that public servants still had much to be proud of as he pointed to the ongoing projects such as on the East Coast of Demerara (ECD) and the Cheddi Jagan International Airport (CJIA) expansion project.“The West Demerara road is close to completion. So there has been a hive of activity across the country. A lot of spending is taking place, so if only because of that, people should be happy because a lot of money is being injected into the economy,” Jordan said.Last year, public servants had waited with bated breath to hear if Government would announce a month tax-free bonus but were instead treated to a reduced amount.He later told reporters last year that Government simply did not have the monies available to make the one-month tax-free payment to members of the public service.Speaking to public administration and public financial management during his presentation of the 2017 National Estimates (Budget), Finance Minister Jordan had said “this Administration has inherited a national crisis of institutional lethargy and ineptitude (in the public service).”The Minister in providing some insight on Government’s proposal to reform the public service through its public servants, pointed to comprehensive institutionalisation of the tenets of results-based management. He pointed too to the recently opened public service college and its role in revitalising workers.last_img read more

England striker launches scathing attack on West Ham owner over ‘outrageous slur’ about injury record

first_img1 Charlie Austin and David Sullivan Charlie Austin has hit back at an ‘outrageous slur’ from West Ham owner David Sullivan after he said signing the player would be a big risk for the club.The 26-year-old QPR striker has been linked with a host of Barclays Premier League clubs over the summer after scoring 18 goals as the Hoops dropped out of the top flight last season.West Ham are one of several sides who have reportedly looked to make a move for Austin, who was called up by England manager Roy Hodgson for the final two internationals of the season, but QPR have not budged from their £15million valuation.But, when asked on the Knees Up Mother Brown podcast if Austin was a target, Sullivan was bullish about the former Burnley striker’s injury record.“They say he has no ligaments in his knee, who knows?” Sullivan said.“To sign a £15m player is a big risk. He could go on for years, but knowing our luck his knee will go in his first game and that’s the end of it.“If we had £100m to spend we may say ‘we’ll spend £15m and gamble one-sixth of our budget’. But it’s not one-sixth of our budget, it’d smash our budget to bits.“And he didn’t keep Queens Park Rangers up. If he’d kept them up single-handedly you might say it was different – and a few of those goals were penalties.”Austin released a personal statement on Twitter in reply to the Sullivan comments, defending his fitness and his professionalism.“I feel I have no option but to address the inaccurate, misleading and uninformed innuendo about my physical condition that has been raised today by an individual who is not privy to my personal health history,” his statement read.“It is one of a number of inaccurate reports about my so-called injury problems which have been made over the summer.“For the record, there is nothing wrong with my ‘ligaments’, as has been suggested. My strength and performance in pre-season has been excellent and with two goals in my last two games I don’t think there is any doubt that my match sharpness is as good as ever.“I scored 18 goals in the Premier League last season, which would not be possible were I feeling discomfort or pain.“Like many professional footballers, I have the legacy of injuries picked up over my career but the effect on my day-to-day training and on matchday is non-existent.“For a senior figure at a Premier League club to insinuate that I could break down at any moment is an outrageous slur on my professionalism and the work that has gone into making me the footballer than I am today. I am fit, strong and looking forward to Saturday’s home game against Rotherham.”The Hammers are keen to add a forward to their squad with Andy Carroll, Enner Valencia and Mauro Zarate all nursing injuries – with boss Slaven Bilic admitting it is a striker he is most likely to bring in before the close of the window.It is understood West Ham had a list of up to 12 forwards who they were looking to bring in, but it appears Austin is not one of them as QPR look to hang on to their main asset in their battle to secure an immediate return to the Premier League.last_img read more