Faculty Council meeting held Nov. 18

first_imgOn Nov. 18 the members of the Faculty Council approved the Harvard Summer School course list for 2016. They also heard a report on the legislated review of the Ph.D. program in Film and Visual Studies and a report on student diversity. Finally, they discussed proposed reforms to the General Education program.The council next meets on Dec. 9. The next meeting of the faculty is on Dec. 1. The preliminary deadline for the Feb. 2 meeting of the faculty is Jan. 19 at noon.last_img

Nolan hopeful over Carroll

first_img “We’re absolutely delighted, it was a great victory after a well deserved point on Wednesday night,” Nolan told whufc.com. “It’s just marred by an incident, but hopefully that’ll get overturned and we can just get on with it and look forward to what’s going to be another tough game away to Aston Villa. “Andy was gutted because he wanted to get minutes too, which is important for him, and he’s honest enough to say it’s definitely not a red. You sort of know when someone’s done something wrong and I sort of knew he hadn’t. “He was very surprised, it was difficult, but we showed tremendous character to grind the result out.” Carroll was long touted as the Hammers’ saviour by Allardyce and his understanding with Nolan – the pair were also team-mates at Newcastle – was evident for all to see on the striker’s third start of the season following a heel injury. “Everyone’s forgotten what it’s like because we haven’t been able to do it on a regular basis for a long time,” Nolan added. “We knew that the more and more he got his fitness up, we had that in us. “We’ve been working hard on the training pitch together just to make sure that we get it right, and we reaped the rewards.” Carroll twice provided the assists for Nolan to score – doubling his tally for the season – in the Hammers’ first home win in the Premier League since November 30. Hammers manager Sam Allardyce confirmed after the 2-0 win that the club would appeal against Carroll’s dismissal for an altercation with Swansea defender Chico Flores which leaves the England striker facing a three-match ban. Defender Winston Reid returned as a substitute after being out since November following ankle surgery and Nolan believes things are looking up for the Hammers. He added: “We have just got to make sure we keep a clean bill of health now and if we do you’ll see performances like (against Swansea) throughout the rest of the season. “Saturday proved that with a mostly-fit squad, we will get results. Hopefully now, touch wood, you’ll see us moving onwards and upwards.” In a wide-open relegation battle, eight points separate the bottom 11 teams, with Swansea in mid-table but just two points better off than the Hammers, who occupy the final place in the relegation zone. Michael Laudrup’s men ended an eight-match winless sequence by beating Fulham before falling to defeat at Upton Park. After the loss, Laudrup was keeping his emotions in check. “For me it’s always the same,” he added. “We cannot go up or down just because of one result, one way or another. “Last year there were a lot of teams involved, maybe not 11, but seven or eight until the last five or six games. “The only difference compared to last season is that there’s not one or two teams already stuck down there, eight, 10 points behind the rest, like we saw with Reading and QPR. “It makes it more – I don’t like the word interesting, because we’re part of it – but at least for the neutral spectator it’s interesting.” West Ham captain Kevin Nolan hopes Andy Carroll’s red card will be rescinded so the pair can swiftly resume the partnership which earned victory over Swansea on Saturday. Press Associationlast_img read more

Justyn Knight, arguably the greatest SU runner of all time, is looking for his first individual national championship

first_img Published on November 15, 2017 at 9:48 pm Contact Matt: [email protected] In 2016, Knight missed qualifying for the Olympics by 0.1 seconds, his mother Jennifer said. That November, Tiernan beat Knight at the national championship. Come 2017, he qualified for the World Championships in the 5,000-meter. When it turned to race time, a familiar face lurked in the finals. It was Tiernan.With five laps to go, Tiernan moved into the lead, quickening the pace by two seconds. But Knight didn’t budge. He stayed with the pack, gradually chasing down the man that beat him a year earlier.Tiernan couldn’t maintain his pace, and Knight only sped up, inching closer and closer. Knight finished in ninth place in his first appearance on the world stage. Tiernan took 11th.“If he doesn’t win,” former SU runner Martin Hehir said, “he’s just going to come back with a vengeance.Knight’s talent matches his flare to make him one of the most well-known runners in the world. As one of the nation’s most dominant athletes, he’s commanded attention from everyone, including his teammates. They want to run with him.Everyone’s always wanted to run with him.When the St. Michael Catholic (Ontario, Canada) High School runner was just beginning to rise to local stardom, his head coach, Frank Bergin, found him waiting at the track after practice. Everyone else was gone, and Bergin was on his way out, but Knight was waiting for two kids from the nearby elementary school, who couldn’t have been older than 11, Bergin said. The two had seen Knight run and asked him to run a lap with them after school. So Knight waited and ran with them.“I remember just going ‘wow.’” Bergin said. “That’s Justyn.”Once Knight arrived on Syracuse’s campus two years later, he made an immediate impact, running in the national championship his true freshman season.By his sophomore season in 2015, Knight emerged as one of the best runners in the country. Hehir had always been the runner that teammates modeled themselves after. Soon, even for Hehir, that runner became Knight.Andy Mendes | Digital Design EditorOne of the reasons that Hehir excelled so much as a senior, Smith said, was because Knight took the pressure off Hehir and let him run freely.“Justin’s transformed the program and he’s taken us to a place where we couldn’t have been without him,” Hehir said. “That’s meant a lot for the program and for the future of the program.”The pair, along with emerging star Colin Bennie, led Syracuse to its first national championship in 64 years. When Bennie arrived at campus, like many, he copied Hehir’s model. But in 2015, he mimicked Knight.“Justyn being the guy to keep with,” Bennie’s mother Lisa said, “is the best training situation Colin could be in.”The entire time Knight trained for worlds, he checked on his teammate’s summer training, Jennifer said. In between workouts this summer in Vaughan, Ontario, Knight’s phone would be littered with messages from younger runners asking how his training was going, but also asking questions about their own training and how to prepare for the fall.Syracuse head coach Chris Fox traveled to London this summer for Knight’s race. As soon as it was over, Knight found his coach.“‘Let’s get ready for cross-country,’” he said to Fox.Throughout this season, Knight has worked to ensure his teammates are ready to battle at NCAAs. He sets the tones in workouts, checks in on how his teammates train and recover and takes on his own coaching responsibilities as the team’s leader. All his preparations have lined up for this Saturday, when Knight has one final attempt at a cross-country crown. “I think it’s a pretty fitting final chapter for him to put his mark on,” Hehir said. “The fact that he hasn’t won a title yet chomps this up to make it even sweeter. It could be a storybook ending.”Knight loves the pressure and the spotlight, but he’s had to adjust to it. Being the favorite is something he’s struggled with in the past. After he rose to prominence in 2015, the lights shined brighter and the microphones in his face multiplied. He felt overwhelmed. But he’s learned to embrace it and use the added attention to take the pressure off of his team.No matter the finish, Saturday’s race will bring an end to the greatest cross-country career a Syracuse runner has ever had.“I’m 30 years old and I don’t think that I will ever have another Justyn in my coaching career,” Smith said. “He is a once in a lifetime talent.”And on Saturday afternoon, he can capture the one thing that’s eluded him. Comments For two years, across three seasons, Justyn Knight couldn’t beat Oregon’s Edward Cheserek. No one could. Cheserek, or “the King” as he was called, finished his college career as a 17-time national champion in 21 possible events. But, at the cross-country national championship last year, Knight finished ahead of him.Then he ran into another problem: Villanova’s Patrick Tiernan. Knight prefers a sit-and-kick type race, where the runners don’t burn themselves out during the race, but then sprint ahead at the end. Tiernan set the pace that day, and made sure he didn’t let Knight kick. Instead, he burned the last mile, forcing Knight to chase, preventing a strong kick.“Sometimes you have your day,” Syracuse assistant coach Adam Smith said, “and that day was Tiernan’s day.”Cheserek and Tiernan were both experienced runners in their last year of eligibility. Knight was one of the favorites, but not the favorite. In all cross-country disciplines, outdoor and indoor track, Knight has had his share of chances to claim an individual national title, but hasn’t won one yet.Knight is the best runner in Syracuse history, with two top-five finishes in three years at the national championship. When Knight began his college career, Syracuse was a middle-of-the-pack finisher at nationals, unable to get over the hump. Knight turned the team into a perennial top-three team and national champion in 2015. He has carried the program on his back while making his teammates better. But he has never captured an individual cross-country championship. On Saturday, he has one final opportunity to do it.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I don’t go into any race racing for second,” Knight said.center_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more