Limit on contactless payments rises

first_imgContactless payments are set to account for more retail transactions now the upper limit has increased from £20 to £30.The UK Cards Association said the average supermarket shop of £25.17 now fell below the contactless limit, giving shoppers more choice about the way they paid for goods, according to The Grocer.Software allowing for the greater payments started rolling out on 1 September among retailers that already accept contactless payment.Payment processing company Worldpay said that many of the larger stores would be ready to take on the new limit straight away. It said an automated process called a “heartbeat” had started to update all the terminals used by smaller stores early yesterday (Tuesday) morning to increase the amount they were able to take on their Worldpay terminals.Dave Hobday, managing director, said: “Increasing the limit to £30 will only intensify the demand for convenience and speed everywhere we shop.”Retailers are encouraged to contact their point-of-sale device provider for information about upgrading their contactless terminal.MethodData from the UK Cards Association show consumers spent more than £2.5bn on contactless cards in the first half of the year compared with £2.32bn for all of 2014. Spend using the contactless method climbed from £287m a month in January to £567m in June.Does contactless payment have a place in the baking industry? Take our survey to see whether bakers and their customers have embraced this new technology. Create your own user feedback surveylast_img read more

FIFPro seeks Guerrero WC reprieve

first_imgRio de Janeiro, May 21: World football players union FIFPro has asked FIFA to allow Peru captain Paolo Guerrero to play in the World Cup despite a doping ban.Guerrero, who tested positive for cocaine metabolite benzoylecgonine last October, had his six-month ban extended to 14 months last week following an appeal by the World Anti-Doping Agency.In a social media post, FIFPro said it hoped “for a breakthrough in the next 24-48 hours.”Last Monday’s decision by the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) rules the 34-year-old Flamengo striker out of the World Cup in Russia, which starts on June 14.Peru qualified for the tournament for the first time in 36 years by beating New Zealand in an inter-continental playoff last November.Guerrero, who says he unwittingly consumed the substance in contaminated tea, has said his lawyers are “considering all options” to contest the CAS decision and clear his name.FIFPro last week described the ruling as disproportionate and inconsistent with the facts presented during the case. IANSlast_img read more

Silent but deadly: Freshman wing Johnson brings reserved personality to SU bench

first_imgShe seemed puzzled by the question. She said she misses her “sweetheart” dearly while he’s at school. When she first opened the door to the Melo Center, she said, “Where’s my son? Where’s my son?” And she loved going to every one of his games at Lower Merion High School in Pennsylvania. She knew all of that. But a more challenging question stumped her. His mother Sharon Dash watched intently from two feet to his right. Johnson’s aunt, uncle and cousin surrounded her. Dash listened as her son mentioned that he can’t swim, his favorite villain is the Joker and he loves any kind of rice. AdvertisementThis is placeholder text From his standard, squeaky-clean white, size 14 Jordans up to his No. 2 jersey and orange headband, everything was traditional. No Ron Patterson wacky hair. No DaJuan Coleman outlandish tattoos. No Jerami Grant irreversible grin. “At one point in time I thought you had to stick a pin in him to get him to wake up,” Bobby Johnson said. “He was always laid back, and I would always tell him, ‘When you come out on the floor, we don’t need that cool sh*t.’” But she couldn’t pinpoint anything that stood out about him. The banter continued. Dash and her sister Michelle Scott quipped about just how quiet Johnson is. “Noooo,” Dash responded, incredulously looking at her sister, taking a step back and jerking her head downward in disbelief. “I think he talks too much,” Scott said. Published on November 6, 2013 at 3:28 am Contact Trevor: [email protected] | @TrevorHass “He’s just such a plain kid,” Dash said. “Baby, you’ve got to get interesting.” But Johnson’s father Bobby Johnson, who played professional basketball in Portugal and Germany, is the antithesis of quiet. When Bobby grew up in South Philadelphia, the culture was completely different. Jawing and trash talk was incessant. It was the expectation. You had to go out there and play and shut those people up, Bobby Johnson said. If you didn’t, you’d never come back on the floor again.Johnson and his father used to wake up at 6 a.m. and head to Lower Merion to work out for an hour. Johnson was dedicated throughout, Bobby said, but he didn’t always show enthusiasm on the court. B.J. Johnson stood firmly in place with his hands behind his back on the outskirts of the Carmelo K. Anthony Basketball Center gym during media day on Oct. 18. “I was being facetious,” Scott responded wryly. Facebook Twitter Google+ Then Johnson flashed a golden smile, revealing a slight gap between his two front teeth. He swayed back and forth, clearly uncomfortable by the entire situation. Johnson, who’s only 17, is as quiet as they come, according to his relatives. But his reserved nature and tendency to fly under the radar made him lethal in high school and may help him earn a spot in the Syracuse rotation. Comments He didn’t hear his son swear until he was 15 or 16.“I think the first time I actually heard him yell out the four-letter word he was playing at one of the practices and he was like ‘F*ck!’” Bobby Johnson said. “I was like, ‘OK, you do care.’”Before Lower Merion’s state championship game against Chester (Pa.) High School, Johnson and his father drove to the rehabilitation center because Johnson had sprained his ankle and needed treatment. Bobby tried to elicit some sort of enthusiasm out of his son — to make sure he was ready for the biggest game of his high school career.After losing to Chester three years in a row, Johnson and the Aces were out for revenge. But Johnson was calm, unfazed by the pressure of the situation.“I got ’em, dad,” he said coolly.“He got ’em!” Bobby said. Lower Merion beat Chester 63-47, ending the Clippers’ 78-game in-state winning streak. Johnson finished with 22 points and 11 rebounds. But the fire was never fully there. When Bobby Johnson first watched his son play at Lower Merion, he sat there wondering if the other fans would get riled up like he did.“When I first went to the games, the Lower Merion people are sitting there like it’s a cricket match,” Bobby said. “I remember being like, ‘What the — ain’t anybody going to get the guys going?’”Months later, removed from one of the most dominant stints at Lower Merion since Kobe Bryant’s hey-day, Johnson comes to SU as the No. 17 small forward in the class of 2013. Yet on media day, few reporters come his way. He stands far from the center of attention as reporters crowd around stars C.J. Fair and Grant. Most people don’t expect Johnson to play much this season. He may not. But his quiet confidence will help prepare him if he does. He’s not a blue-chipper, 5-star guy, Bobby said, but he works every day.“Sometimes it’s better to be that guy that comes in under the radar and just does what he needs to do,” Bobby said. “Then all of a sudden everybody’s saying, ‘I knew he would be that guy.’”Bobby Johnson recalls asking his son a question back in high school. “It was funny because I asked B.J., ‘Suppose this summer you really blew up and had Roy Williams knocking on your door. Would you want to go to North Carolina?“And he was like, ‘No.’“I said ‘If Coach K was knocking on your door, would you want to go to Duke?’“And he was like, ‘No.’“He had a plan, and it’s what he wanted to do.”Now Johnson’s ready to live out the dream he has had since seventh grade: star at Syracuse. Jim Boeheim said Johnson has surprised the coaching staff up to this point. He’s young, but he can ball. “I’m just really excited to be here and for the season to start,” Johnson said. “That’s pretty much all I’ve been waiting for and now it’s here.” “What’s the most fascinating thing about B.J.?” a reporter asked. last_img read more