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first_imgThe micro-mini is a must have this season, as the sexiest of all skirts regains its catwalk throne and gives our favourite slouchy combats a sharp kick in the pants. Patterned tights at D&G, leggings at Versus, opaque tights in bright colours at Marc Jacobs and almost endless thigh-high boots at Gucci all meant one thing – the focus is on legs this season. But the sudden leg-fetish is nothing to fear even if you don’t have the proportions of a supermodel – in fact it’s pretty good news. There’s no reason to slog for pointless hours on the cross-trainer; there is no J.Lo bottom of legs. Yes, most of us may turn green at the sight of Gisele in a miniskirt, but many guys may not agree with you. Britney’s legs are short and chunky and Beyoncé’s thighs are far from toned but guys go crazy over both. Go figure. Treat your own little slice of perfection to some of this season’s leg-hugging lovelies.All clothes from GAFF, Broad St,Short faded denim skirt £65; Black cow-neck top £54;Tartan skirt £72; Red and khaki top £27Model – KATIE CARROLLARCHIVE: 0th Week MT2003last_img read more

Planting herself in the right career

first_img The vegans are coming, and we might join them Nisha Vora was unhappy. A high-achieving daughter of Indian immigrants in California, Vora was a graduate of the University of California, Berkeley, and Harvard Law School. After graduation in 2012, the newly minted attorney landed what many would consider a plum job in corporate law, but she found the hours long, the work uninspiring.What to do? Two years in, she decided to take an around-the-world backpacking trip with her partner, fellow HLS graduate Maxwell Chapman. They journeyed through Europe and Asia, including a trek through the Himalayas and visits to Thailand, Vietnam, and Laos.Vora decided to reset. She would continue in the law, but this time at a New York City nonprofit helping low-income tenants. Better, but still not quite right. “I started thinking about what actually makes me happy,” she said. “The answer always came back to food.”Recently, the lawyer-turned-food-blogger released her debut cookbook, “The Vegan Instant Pot Cookbook,” which builds on her success as a chronicler of vegan recipes and photos on her popular site, Rainbow Plant Life.,“In the back of my mind, I had always wanted to write a cookbook,” Vora said. “I did not think I was qualified.”Published by Penguin Random House, the book has more than 90 recipes, many of which are accompanied by Vora’s photos.“I wanted to create a vegan Instant Pot cookbook that would be not only the bible of Instant Pot cooking, but also a beautiful book of photos inspiring you, a cookbook you share with family and friends,” Vora said.That sentiment recalls a story she tells about one of her favorite HLS professors, Todd Rakoff, himself an HLS graduate with the class of 1975. Currently the Byrne Professor of Administrative Law, Rakoff was Vora’s section leader for her first-year law classes. She remembers his advice to students: “At the end of the day, if you eat dinner with people you love, you’re doing something right.”Rakoff’s words resonated with Vora, and they remained with her. She said that the one thing that makes her happiest “is cooking for family and friends and eating together.”Around this time, Vora became a vegan after watching 10 different documentaries on the subject over several days. She said that after she learned about the meat industry — including factory farms — becoming vegan “seemed like a no-brainer.”,Vora’s renewed interest in food, and her decision to become a vegan, led her to start Rainbow Plant Life. “It was a hobby at the time,” she said, but the blog expanded to include Instagram and YouTube accounts. Readers began following Vora’s recipes and photos, and a New York healthy-food startup, Hungryroot, hired her to take all of its food photography.Many of Vora’s recipes were made with an Instant Pot, which she said “really helped me get healthier meals into my diet without having much prep. Penguin Random House noticed the recipes and contacted me.”She embraced the idea of a cookbook, but it came with a shorter-than-usual time frame.“Most cookbook authors in the U.S. are given a year,” Vora said. “My publisher wanted to fast-track it. The Instant Pot is so hot; vegan cooking is so hot. It took a little under six months to write, test the recipes, and [take] pictures.”Vora’s HLS background proved “surprisingly helpful,” she recalled, adding that her Law School experiences, including at the Journal of Law and Gender, made her a better writer. She said that HLS instilled the “nitty-gritty things” that came in handy as she worked to create “an easy-to-read, clean, easy-to-follow cookbook.”She infused the cookbook with recipes representing a unique blend of comfort food and vegan cuisine, including versions of lasagna, chocolate cake, and mac and cheese.Other recipes reflect food from around the world, including India, where her parents came from. (One of her favorites is tofu cauliflower tikka masala, a vegan spin on the popular chicken dish.) Although she describes her mother as a wonderful cook, she didn’t like much Indian food growing up. “It was the same dal, mixed vegetables, Indian bread,” she recalled, quipping, “As a child, I was already picky.”,However, she has grown to appreciate Indian food — as well as the fact that her parents’ homeland is a country of diverse regions and cuisine.“I kind of rethought my earlier, childish belief,” Vora said. “I tried Indian food when I would go back to visit my parents. I was excited to see my mother’s cooking.”The cookbook also features recipes from other parts of the globe, including Latin America (frijoles, or Mexican-style pinto beans, are among the “Satisfying Sides”) and Africa (such as the West African peanut stew).Vora says that she often cooks for non-vegans, many of whom say that the food is so delicious, it couldn’t possibly be healthy. She reassures them that not only does everything taste good, “everything’s plant-based” so “you feel good about what you’re eating.” Related How Harvard’s cooks serve up 5 million meals a year In replicating the look and taste of real meat, companies are appealing to the mainstream consumer Philosophy professor’s book asks humans to rethink their relationships with animals center_img ‘There they are, on our dinner plates’ From plants to plates What we eat and why we eat it Ph.D. students explore the culture and science of food in the Veritalk podcast last_img read more

Addie Mae (Seals) Johnson – Brookville

first_imgShe was preceded in death by her husband, Levi Seals, who passed away on September 20, 1960; two sons, Paul Edward in 1943 and David in 1944; one great-grandchild, Triston Seals, as well as two brothers, Ernest “Bud” Tipton of Carlisle, OH and Herbert Tipton of Fairborn, OH. Addie loved her flowers and was winner of the monthly garden spot twice.  She also loved decorating for Christmas.  Addie loved her children, grandkids and great-grandkids, and she was loved by all them. Addie had 9 grandchildren, Arron (Bobbi Jo) Reynolds of Peppertown, Daron (Kelly) Reynolds of Laramie, WY, David (Kris) Reynolds of Hamburg, Brian Seals of Liberty, Gina (Randy Schuck) Robinson of Liberty, Mike (Lea) Seals of Brookville, Justin Seals of Brookville, Holly (Ryan) Meyer of Harrison, OH, and Andrew Seals of Cedar Grove.  Also surviving are 11 great-grandchildren, Patrick Seals, Jessica Seals, David Kyle Reynolds, Kathleen Reynolds, Megan Schuck, Travis Schuck, Kennedy K. Seals, Jack Seals, Colin Seals, Naomi Seals and Alina Seals. Addie Mae (Seals) Johnson, at the age of 95 went home to be with the Lord on August 9, 2018.  She was born in Estill County Kentucky, a daughter to George and Patsy (Barnes) Tipton on September 11, 1922.  Addie retired from Philco Ford after 17 years of service. Those surviving who will cherish Addie’s memories are her children, Allen “Butch” and Alice of Liberty; Virgia (Reynolds) and Ray Effing of Batesville; Gary L. and Janet of Brookville, and Denny and Maureen of Cedar Grove. Friends may visit with the family on Tuesday, August 14, 2018 from 9 until 11 a.m. at Cook Rosenberger Funeral Home, 929 Main Street Brookville.  Funeral services will begin at 11 a.m. at the funeral home and burial will follow in Maple Grove Cemetery. As much as Addie loved her flowers, the family has requested that in lieu of flowers, memorials be given to the Brookville VFW in honor of Addie, who was a member of the ladies auxiliary for many years.  To sign the online guestbook please visit www.cookrosenberger.com.  The staff of Cook Rosenberger Funeral Home is honored to care for the family of Addie Mae Seals Johnson.last_img read more