Faculty Council meeting held Nov. 18

first_imgOn Nov. 18 the members of the Faculty Council approved the Harvard Summer School course list for 2016. They also heard a report on the legislated review of the Ph.D. program in Film and Visual Studies and a report on student diversity. Finally, they discussed proposed reforms to the General Education program.The council next meets on Dec. 9. The next meeting of the faculty is on Dec. 1. The preliminary deadline for the Feb. 2 meeting of the faculty is Jan. 19 at noon.last_img

SISTAR program offers student research grants

first_imgFounded in 1991, the Student Independent Study and Research (SISTAR) grant provides Saint Mary’s students and faculty members with the opportunity to create eight-week summer research partnerships. Professor Laura Haigwood, director of the Center for Academic Innovation (CFAI), said the grant was established to encourage the collaboration of Saint Mary’s students and professors. “The program was inspired, in part, by the close, collegial, teaching and research relationships that faculty and students develop at SMC,” she said. “We wanted to be able to reward and encourage that work.” The grant, which provides the student researchers with housing and a stipend, is funded by donations. Haigwood said Maryjeanne Ryan Burke, a 1956 graduate of Saint Mary’s College, is a large contributor to the program. Haigwood said the Burke endowment is offered to specifically qualified professors. “The Burke SISTAR is reserved for full-time, tenure-track faculty who are not yet tenured, and it has proved an outstanding research, teaching and learning opportunity for them and for their students,” she said. Outside of the Burke SISTAR grant, the prerequisites for student and faculty applicants are much more imprecise, Haigwood said. The program is open to all full-time students and faculty of all studies. Haigwood said although the number of applicants varies greatly from year to year, the grant is usually awarded to four student-faculty research partnerships. The grant is typically presented to a rising senior. The application process includes an interview and a written proposal. According to Haigwood, the CFAI grant committee makes the award decisions. The committee is chaired by Haigwood and includes five other faculty members that are elected by the Faculty Assembly. Last year’s four award recipients were selected from a variety of departments. Senior Ashley Feely worked with Sociology Professor Mary Ann Kanieski on a project entitled “Emerging Patterns in Relationships Between Mothers and Their Adult Children: Examining Mothers’ Self-Constructed Identity.” Fellow senior Megan Griffin partnered with Political Science Professor Patrick Pierce on a study called “Race to the Top: The Political Economy of State Tax Incentives for Business.” Brynn Thomas, also a Saint Mary’s senior, collaborated with Professor Susan Latham on a communicative disorders project. Senior Alyssa Klubeck teamed up with history professor David Stefanic on a project called “Women in Revolution: Comparing Women in the French and Irish Revolutions.” Klubeck said the experience was beneficial on an educational and professional level, as well as being enjoyable. “It was an incredible amount of fun to work so closely with one of my favorite professors and gain the experience of working with a professional academic,” Klubeck said. The grant also supports travel and related expenses for the student to attend a professional conference in the next academic year. Stefanic and Klubeck were able to present their study at a conference in Nebraska this fall. Haigwood said the idea behind the grant is to give students the opportunity to work side-by-side in a study with a professor, rather than as an assistant. “We want [the faculty and the student] to work together as genuine peers,” Haigwood said. “SISTAR students are generally more like graduate students than undergraduates in their collaborative work with faculty. We want her to be a co-researcher, or an independent peer researcher.” With aspirations to attend graduate school, Klubeck said she recognized the opportunity the SISTAR grant offered her. However, Klubeck said the program gave her more than just a resume boost. “While research and writing were invaluable, I found what I learned from Dr. Stefancic as a mentor in my work was a great opportunity,” she said. “I think that is what the SISTAR program really has going for it. The connections it builds between students and professors to work together and learn from each other are unparalleled.”last_img read more

The War at Home – PART II

first_img Dani Ticktin Koplik, founder of dtkResources, a professional training and coaching firm, believes that for veterans’ outcomes in the job market to change, they should strive to understand the context and needs of the civilian workplace. He also said it’s important for veterans to avoid using military jargon, citing O*NET Online as a good resource to help veterans convert their military skill sets into civilian terminology. There are numerous resources available to military veterans searching for employment. Here are a few: “They often have the attitude that they are owed a job, and are under the impression that their skill set is more valuable than their civilian counterparts,” Graves said. “They have to understand that you can’t take a CEO of an organization, put stars on their shoulder, and expect them to be a successful general. Just like they can’t take their rank and walk in to the top of the chain of command in a civilian organization.” Feds Hire Vets: This veteran employment website was created as a direct result of the Executive Order signed by President Barack Obama regarding the employment of veterans in the federal government. The site includes information for veteran job seekers, transitioning service members, and veterans’ family members. By Dialogo April 03, 2013 Veterans Green Jobs: Founded in 2008, this organization connects military veterans with training and employment opportunities in the green sector. Any military veteran who served 180 days or more and was discharged under honorable conditions is eligible for the programs they offer. Career Resources for Veterans “In the civilian workplace, competence is assumed and progression through the ranks is often a function of personal relationships, of visibility, and of the softer skills such as displaying emotional intelligence, being able to communicate and build rapport, and establishing trust.” Sara Sutton Fell, founder of FlexJobs, a professional job finding service, suggested that veterans market their supervisory experience to employers. “It is all dependent on the career field of the member, but many gain extensive professional certifications that can translate into the civilian sector. Some such certifications are found in areas such as legal, hazardous materials, healthcare, engineering, transportation, accounting/finance, and information security.” “The reality of the civilian workplace – what it looks like, what it values, how it operates – is quite different from the military reality,” Koplik said. “Very simply, if vets want to secure employment, build a career, and succeed in the civilian sector, they have to accept what today’s business reality looks like. Business now is highly relational, collaborative, and interdependent which means that employers also look for candidates who ‘fit’ into their corporate culture, who understand and embody their corporate mission and buy into their corporate values.” Koplik said this is often foreign to vets who succeeded in a military culture based on merit, in which expectations for performance are well-articulated, clear, and consistent. Citroen said she encourages veterans to become active on LinkedIn and other networks, both in person and online. “Military personnel have extensive supervisory experience as they move up in rank. Not only do they perform as a supervisor and manager, often for numerous projects, programs, or units, but also as a mentor and professional development instructor,” she said. Interestingly enough, Graves, a Navy veteran, said that the largest obstacle for finding a job is often the veterans themselves. Wounded Warrior Careers Program: Offered through the National Organization on Disability (NOD), this program’s purpose is to help veterans with serious disabilities achieve meaningful, rewarding and sustainable careers in the civilian sector. Career specialists work with the veterans, providing support and guidance to help them identify and achieve their career goals. Fell also stressed the importance of certifications obtained while in the military. Daywalt stressed that there are more than 200 skill sets used in the military needed by civilian employers, with leadership being the main skill. VetJobs: Sponsored by the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW), VetJobs is a job board which allows employers to easily reach all members of the military community. VetJobs was established in 1999, and receives 20,000 visitors a day. A Sense of Entitlement Recent efforts by the National Guard have already proven effective in putting Minnesota’s military veterans in civilian jobs, as reported by Minnesota Public Radio. Acting proactively, a team of military officials accompanied government, education and business leaders to Kuwait where they spent a week on a military base and led troops through a rigorous set of exercises designed to help prepare them to job hunt. The exercises included sessions on resume writing and career planning and mock interviews. Of the more than 500 service members who returned from the Middle East without civilian jobs, guard officials said only 35 are still looking for work. Bonds of Courage: With a staff that includes veterans themselves, Bonds of Courage offers a variety of assistance to veteran job-seekers – from networking to preparation for answering difficult interview questions. Identifying and Leveraging Advantages “They should join community groups and business networks,” she said. “There are great jobs that are not advertised, and the traditional ‘say and spray’ model of shooting out resumes is not as powerful at helping recruiters find you.” last_img read more

Syracuse’s surge this season rooted in Heinz Field locker room

first_imgThe kick-start to Syracuse’s upswing this fall began in the Heinz Field visitors locker room 11 months ago. After the Orange’s season-ending loss at Pittsburgh last November — the end of a second-straight 4-8 season for SU — head coach Dino Babers did not allow any other coaches in the locker room. He spoke to only the players, then he asked the seniors to leave and addressed only players who would return this year.Babers’ message: “Everybody wasn’t on board.”“There’s the saying, ‘What you do speaks so loudly I can’t hear what you say,’” Babers said Monday morning. “They were saying the right things, they weren’t doing the right things. And I think I have a team full of guys doing the right things.“And this is where we’re at.”Where Syracuse is at is a significantly more opportune position than that of last year. Through eight games, SU (4-4, 2-2 Atlantic Coast) has the same record as it did this time a year ago. But the 2017 Orange have beaten the defending national champion, stayed within striking distance against Top 25 opponents in LSU, North Carolina State and Miami on the road, and has not lost by more than 11 points all year despite facing one of the most difficult schedules in the country.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textOn Saturday afternoon at Florida State, Syracuse will have a chance to snap a nine-game losing streak against FSU and beat the plunging Seminoles (2-5, 2-4) for the first time since the teams’ first meeting in 1966. This Syracuse upswing, Babers said, is rooted in the Heinz Field locker room last November.“When we lost that Pittsburgh game, and the way we lost it, that was a very emotional time for the team and I,” Babers said. “… I think that’s where we planted the seed, put some fertilizer down and then coming break in spring ball, and the things we did in the summer, we needed to water it and put a lot of sun on it.”Two weeks ago, Syracuse thrust into the national spotlight with the Clemson victory, one of the biggest in program history. At then-No. 8 Miami, one of only five remaining undefeated teams in FBS, Syracuse pulled to within one point in the fourth quarter.Babers said it all traces back to the Pitt game last year. Shortly after that game, Babers looked at the podium in front of him and paused before his postgame press conference.“I gotta stand here after all that?” he said jokingly.By “all that,” Babers meant a near four-hour affair that included 165 plays, 1,312 yards, nine punts, 19 kickoffs, 20 touchdowns, 58 first downs and Syracuse’s defensive collapse. The Orange broke the program record for points allowed, 76, a mark that stood for 125 years.The defensive miscues were a microcosm of the season. In 2016, SU finished 122nd out of 128 FBS teams in total defense and lost its final four games of the season.“It’s going to get better,” Babers said after the game.“The thing you have to remember is that this year the players were thinking and next year they won’t be,” Babers added.Now, here is Syracuse, two wins away from guaranteed bowl eligibility and only 2.5-point underdogs on the road at Florida State, the No. 3 team in the Preseason Top 25.Other notes from Babers’ weekly press conference:Babers said sophomore defensive lineman Kendall Coleman probably could have played at Miami on Oct. 21 at about 65 percent. “I think we’re going to get Coleman back,” for the FSU game, Babers said.As for fellow defensive lineman Josh Black: “We’ll have to see about Joshua.”Graduate transfer safety Jordan Martin has played the last two games with a cast, contributing mostly to special teams. “I don’t think Jordan’s going to be able to be with us. I think he’s going to be pretty much done.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Published on October 30, 2017 at 2:35 pm Contact Matthew: [email protected] | @MatthewGut21last_img read more

Wellington Police Notes: Friday, May 8 to Sunday, May 10, 2015

first_imgWellington Police notes for Friday, May 8 to Sunday, May 10, 2015: Friday, May 8, 2015•5:10 a.m. Thomas C. Dehaven, 54, Oxford, was issued a notice to appear for defective headlight.•10:45 a.m. Officers investigated criminal damage to a vehicle in the 1100 block N. B, Wellington.•11:30 a.m. Bridget A. Cody, 55, Wellington was issued a notice to appear for dog at large.•3:26 p.m. Officers investigated a theft of lumber by unknown suspect(s) in the 900 block N. Woodlawn, Wellington.•3:53 p.m. Officers investigated domestic battery and criminal damage to property by a known suspect in the 300 block E. Lincoln, Wellington.•4:20 p.m. Officers investigated disorderly conduct by a known suspect in the 300 block E. Mill, Wellington.•4:20 p.m. William M. Baker,  45, Wellington was issued a notice to appear for exhibition of speed.•4:52 p.m. Autumn E. Mudd, 29, Wichita, Ks was arrested, charged and bonded with domestic battery and criminal damage to property.•5:28 p.m. Officers investigated an assault and criminal trespass in the 300 block E. Mill, Wellington by a known suspect. The incident occurred on May 7, 2015.•5:34 p.m. Officers investigated an assault by a known suspect in the 1000 block W. Shady Lane, Wellington.•6:52 p.m. Non-Injury accident in the 1000 block N. G, Wellington involving vehicles operated by Jerry D. Butterworth, 73, Wellington and Jennifer K. Regnary, 42, Wellington.•7:00 p.m. Barbara E. Taylor, 76, Wellington was issued a notice to appear for disobeyed traffic signal.•9:54 p.m. Officers took a report of suspicious activity in the 200 block S. B, Wellington.•10:16 p.m. Officers investigated criminal damage to a vehicle in the 600 block N. High Dr, Wellington. Saturday, May 9, 2015•1:41 a.m. Hope A. Vargas, 22, Derby, was issued a notice to appear for driving with no lights.•6:06 p.m. Officers investigated criminal trespass in the 1400 block E. 16th, Wellington by known suspect.•1:07 p.m. Officers took a report of suspicious activity in the 100 block N. B, Wellington.•1:57 p.m. Officers took a report of suspicious activity in the 900 block W. 17th, Wellington.•5:08 p.m. Non-Injury, hit and run accident in the 1600 block N. C, Wellington involving a vehicle operated by Haley N. Toothman, 26, Wellington and fixed objects/mailbox and posts owned by Tiffany D. Ferguson, Wellington and Cynthia G. Kegley, Wellington.•5:08 p.m. Non-Injury, hit and run accident in the 1900 block N. B, Wellington involving a vehicle operated by Haley N. Toothman, 26, Wellington and fixed objects/mailbox and posts owned by Goeff R. Elkins, Wellington.•5:08 p.m. Officers investigated driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs and obstruction of law enforcement officers in the 1100 block N. A, Wellington.•5:46 p.m. Haley N. Toothman, 26, Wellington was arrested, charged and bonded with driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs and obstruction of law enforcement.•6:30 p.m. Officers took a report of suspicious activity in the 500 block E. 4th, Wellington.•7 p.m. Officers took a report of endangering a child in the 500 block Lake View Road, Wellington. Sunday, May 10, 2015•12:58 a.m. Joshua A. Wolf, 39, Wellington was arrested and charged with driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs, fleeing or eluding law enforcement officer, refusal to submit to testing, obstruction with law enforcement officers, improper stop or turn signal and no drivers’ license in possession.•11:15 a.m. Officers took a report of a child in need of care in the 800 block W. College, Wellington.•1:22 p.m. Officers took a report of an animal shelter violation by a known owner in the 1000 block E. 8th, Wellington.•2:53 p.m. Injury, hit and run accident in the 1000 block N. Vandenburg, Wellington involving a vehicle operated by Haley N. Toothman, 26, Wellington and a fixed object/utility pole owned by the city of Wellington.•2:53 p.m. Officers investigated driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs by known suspect in the 1000 block N. Vandenburg, Wellington.•5:10 p.m. Non-Injury, private property accident in the 1000 block W. U.S. 160, Wellington involving vehicles operated by Kimberly R. Shaw, 40, Harper, and Libby L. Driver, 27, Wellington.•8:10 p.m. Kenneth W. Byers, 18, Wellington was issued a notice to appear for seat belt violation.•9:56 p.m. Officers investigated a battery in the 1000 block W. College, Wellington by a known suspect.last_img read more