Hypatia Day commemorates women in science

first_imgWho says mathematics and science are exclusively male-dominated areas of study? Saturday at Saint Mary’s College, nearly 80 seventh and eighth-grade girls defied this stereotype as they participated in various science labs and math-oriented activities for Hypatia Day. Hypatia Day was first organized in 1991 by Sr. Miriam Patrick Cooney, professor emerita of mathematics. Hypatia Day is meant to provide a unique experience for young girls interested in careers in math and science, director of Media Relations Gwen O’Brien said. The event was an opportunity for middle school girls from seven local counties to visit Saint Mary’s and be engaged and mentored by math and science majors, O’Brien said. With the help of Saint Mary’s students and faculty from the math and science departments, students from the surrounding Michiana and Mishawaka area received an early taste of what it is like to be a science or math major, O’Brien said.Various classrooms around the campus were used to showcase the applications of math, engineering, science and other associated fields, O’Brien said.Hypatia Day is named for the first known female mathematician, Hypatia of Alexandria, who was the daughter of ancient Greek mathematician and philosopher Theon, she said. According to legend, Hypatia’s father taught her mathematics during a period in Greek history when young, female girls were excluded from education, O’Brien said. “Hypatia knew something these girls may be figuring out: Math and science are for girls too,” O’Brien said.Associate professor of mathematics and director of Hypatia Day Kristin Kuter said the visiting middle school students were treated to a special address by this year’s keynote speaker, Dr. Tracy Kijewski-Correa, who is an associate professor and chair of the Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences Department at Notre Dame. “[She] was very dynamic, down to earth, and inspirational,” Kuter said. “She focused on empowering the young women in the audience and encouraging them to continue to pursue an education in STEM, emphasizing its power.” The remainder of the day included panel discussions between participating faculty and the girls’ parents that stressed the importance of support for the girls, who participated in hands-on sessions with Saint Mary’s math and science majors, O’Brien said. A variety of activities were put on by the math and computer science clubs, which helped the girls decode encrypted messages and code in programming language.The chemistry club had the girls make “goo” and look at different colored flames produced by various substances, and the biology and engineering clubs integrated their fundamental elements into fun games, Kuter said. “The student participants seemed to enjoy the hands-on activities, and the parents were very grateful for the information we provided about the upcoming curricular choices that should be made for their daughter to continue on to college,” Kuter said.This is Kuter’s fifth year running the event since she inherited the task from her predecessor, professor Ewa Misiolek, Kuter said.“[It is important to] encourage young women, especially those that are transitioning from middle to high school, that they can do anything, including math or science,” Kuter said.Kuter believes it is all a matter of self-confidence and self-esteem in terms of encouraging girls interested in mathematics and the sciences to continue to strive for achievement, Kuter said.“Girls need to be encouraged to persevere. They need to be told they can do it,” she said. “The stereotype that girls cannot excel in math and science unfortunately still exists in society and we need to counteract those messages at every opportunity possible, before the student disengages.“Given the research, if these girls are not encouraged, they may not have the confidence to continue.”Kuter said this year’s event was a success, and she hopes next year’s Hypatia Day will include an added session for physics students. Tags: Hypatia Daylast_img read more

FDA Issues Emergency Approval of COVID-19 Test for “Pooled” Use

first_imgThe Food and Drug Administration over the weekend gave emergency approval to a new approach to COVID-19 testing that combines test samples in batches rather than running them one by one, thereby speeding up the process.The FDA announced on Saturday that it had reissued an emergency use authorization to Quest Diagnostics to use its coronavirus test with pooled samples.It is the first test to be authorized for use in that way.With pooling, labs would combine parts of samples from several people and test them together.A negative result would clear everyone in the batch.On the other hand, a positive result would require each sample to be individually retested.Pooling works best with lab-run tests, which take hours, not the quicker individual tests that are used in clinics or doctor’s offices.Today, the FDA issued the first Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for sample pooling in a #COVID19 diagnostic test. https://t.co/YtHeydxH1N pic.twitter.com/WF7Im9dIXP— U.S. FDA (@US_FDA) July 18, 2020 The potential benefits of sample pooling include stretching lab supplies further, as well as reducing costs and expanding testing to millions more Americans who may unknowingly be spreading the virus.Health officials continue to say they believe that infected, asymptomatic people are largely responsible for the rising number of cases throughout the country.“It’s a really good tool. It can be used in any of a number of circumstances, including at the community level or even in schools,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, said last month at a Senate hearing.Pooling does not save time or resources when used in a COVID-19 hot spot, such as a nursing home. That is because the logistical and financial benefits of pooling only show when a small number of pools test positive.Experts recommend the technique be used when fewer than 10 percent of people are expected to test positive for the virus.last_img read more

Syracuse falls to North Carolina State, 3-0, after recording lowest shot output of year

first_imgSyracuse (7-6-2, 2-4-1 Atlantic Coast) fell at North Carolina State (10-4-1, 3-3-1) 3-0, after recording its fewest shot total all season.The Orange has taken the fewest shots in the conference (51) of teams that have played at least seven ACC games. SU, which only has three scores in conference play, is averaging 0.429 goals per ACC game. That ranks 11th in the conference.After a scoreless 35 minutes, N.C. State’s Ricarda Walkling delivered the first blow. Later in the game, just over a minute removed from Kailee Coonan giving the Orange its second shot of the game, Tziarra King matched that number for the Wolfpack in goals. It was her first of what would be two goals in the game.SU didn’t even record a shot on goal before King gave NC State a 3-0 lead that it never looked back from.The sophomore King not only added two goals, but assisted on the first goal of the game. She alone outshot the Orange 6-4 and nearly matched the Orange’s total number of goals since beginning ACC play.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThis performance marks the sixth time the Orange has been shutout, five of those coming in SU’s past seven games.Senior goalkeeper Courtney Brosnan, who faced eight shots on goal, made five saves and enters her final three regular season games with 317 career saves. She continues to inch closer to the Syracuse all-time lead, needing just 15 in her next three games to reach that mark..Syracuse returns to SU soccer stadium to play Virginia at 7 p.m. on Thursday for the first of a two-game home stand. Comments Published on October 14, 2017 at 4:52 pm Contact Michael: [email protected] | @MikeJMcCleary Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more