It’s Always Funky In Philadelphia: The Gang Plays A Slow “Llama”

first_imgFor those planning to attend some or all of Phish’s 13-night run at Madison Square Garden in NYC, make sure to check out Our Official Guide To Phish Baker’s Dozen Late Nights.[photo by Andrew Blackstein] Phish‘s summer tour rolled through Philadelphia, PA around this time last year with two shows at the beautiful Mann Center For Performing Arts. Trey Anastasio, a New Jersey native and longtime Philadelphia Flyers fan, is always quick to rave about how much the band loves playing the classic shed (as he did during the first show of the run, to the delight of the hometown crowd).Crosseyed And Mannless: Phish Debuts Three In Philly FinaleOne certain highlight of the run was the 6/29/16 fan-favorite “Llama”. The classic tune, usually played at blistering speeds, was performed in half time, turning the rocker into a slow, dripping, super-funky jam for just the second time, following last summer’s “Raleigh Llama” from Walnut Creek Amphitheatre.You can watch the performance below, thanks to YouTuber LazyLightning55a:last_img read more

The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

first_imgAs the 2016 Olympics came to an end, I wanted to focus on some good things, some bad things, and one ugly incident.  There were many super performances by the world’s greatest athletes.  I have already written about swimming and gymnastics, so today I want to focus on track and field.Usain Bolt is definitely the world’s fastest human.  Some people ask why he is so quick. He is 6’5″ with fast leg turnover and an attitude that allows him to relax and not worry so he gets the maximum out of his body.  Ashton Eaton again proved he is the world’s greatest athlete by winning another gold in the decathlon.  The American 100m hurdlers got the first sweep in the history of women’s running events.Unfortunately, Ryan Lochte and his rowdy friends showed the world how some athletes think they can get by with their fame and/or their money.  They seem to think those two things will keep them out of trouble.  At the age of 32 Lochte has earned a great living from his swimming prowess.  As you probably saw, he already has a publicist and a lawyer available at his beck and call.  Let’s hope that the real Olympics for the Americans is not remembered for this incident alone.last_img read more

Memories still haunting on genocide anniversary

first_imgGLENDALE – The blood-stained carriage and the smoldering city still seemed fresh to the Rev. Vartan Dulgarian as he recalled personal memories of what many believe was the first genocide of the 20th century. “The garbage wagon – all the bodies just piled up – the blood was flowing for three days,” Dulgarian, 96, said Monday as he recounted memories of a massacre of Armenians in Izmir in 1922. The city on Turkey’s Aegean coast, then held by Greeks, was set ablaze by invading Turks. He had lived there with his mother and sister, and was being marched away with dozens of others to the slaughter when he recognized a Turkish grocer whom he had worked for during the past three summers. “He was the head of the soldiers,” he said. “I went up to him and embraced him. He said, ‘Oh, you are here?’ He said, ‘Put this child in my cart and put a fez on him.’ He took me back to my mother.” Dulgarian eventually got on a ship to Greece, then ended up in Egypt before coming to America decades later and settling in Glendale. As old age claims more survivors of the mass slaughter known as the Armenian Genocide – which Armenians say began on this date in 1915 – Dulgarian is among the handful of eyewitnesses still able to tell his story. In a way, he’s planting seeds in the minds of the next generation that he knows one day will bear fruit. “I am 96 years old,” he said. “All the bloody things happened in my life … it’s important for the new generation to know that these people have been brutalized, and massacred, so they know their history.” Dulgarian’s story is a slice of forbidden history still disputed in the halls of power in Europe, a story the U.S. government does not recognize as genocide. Armenians and many historians have asserted that Ottoman Turks began the displacement and slaughter of some 1.5 million ethnic Armenians in Turkey on April 24, 1915, a campaign that lasted until 1923. Its 92nd anniversary today will be marked by remembrances in Glendale, home of the largest Armenian community outside Armenia. In L.A., a march from the Little Armenia neighborhood to the Turkish consulate is planned. Meanwhile, Turkey has acknowledged that large numbers of Armenians died between 1915 to 1923 but has denied that it was genocide. Instead, its leaders say the death toll is inflated and that the massacres were the result of civil unrest during the collapse of the Ottoman Empire. Turkey took out a full-page newspaper ad Monday, paid for by its embassy in Washington, which invited Armenia to “study the historical facts jointly.” The idea of a joint historical commission has been touted by Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan since April 2005 – and has been rebuffed by Armenian leaders. “We think that there are two narratives here that are diametrically opposed to each other,” Turkish Consul Timur Soylemez said Monday. “It is a matter that belongs to history. … In order to reconcile this history, we need to look at it in a sober, sincere and genuine way.” For Levon Marashlian, a historian at Glendale College, the proposal is actually a step back. “It’s an effort to divert attention from the main issue,” he said. “There is so much evidence already that it’s a genocide that a study – the kind Turkey wants – would not be productive. It’s like proving again the Civil War happened.” The ad also supports efforts to “examine history, not legislate it.” U.S. Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Pasadena, is making his annual push to pass an Armenian Genocide recognition bill in Congress. But the White House and Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice have sidestepped the issue, as Turkey is a key regional ally. “The crime of genocide is the highest crime according to international law,” Soylemez said. “You don’t throw these allegations around lightly. The solution is not in the U.S. The solution is between Turkey and Armenia.” But for many who have lost relatives in the massacres or during the subsequent exile in the Syrian desert, healing can only begin with recognition. “We’re still trying to get away from the desert,” said Raffi Momjian, executive director of the Genocide Education Project, a San Francisco-based nonprofit focused on Armenian Genocide education. “We can’t do that until we get the proper recognition.” And those nightmarish memories will always be etched in Dulgarian’s mind. “In my life, always I pray for the people,” he said. “I (forgive) them. But I can never forget the genocide.” [email protected] (818) 546-3304 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more