Jim Boeheim on the NIT’s experimental rules: ‘It makes no sense’

first_img Published on March 15, 2017 at 11:51 pm Contact Paul: [email protected] | @pschweds Facebook Twitter Google+ The second occurrence came with over 12 minutes left in the second half, when Lydon drew UNCG’s fifth foul of the 10-minute segment after grabbing a defensive rebound. He converted both free throws.With the Orange pulling away for most of the second half, the change in free-throw situations didn’t affect the outcome of the game. But as SU’s march toward the NIT crown continues it could be a factor down the line, a factor that Boeheim doesn’t like. Commentscenter_img Prior to Syracuse’s opening game in the National Invitation Tournament, head coach Jim Boeheim said he wasn’t sure what to expect from the tournament’s experimental rules.Boeheim and his staff mentioned the rules to the SU players, although they didn’t go into great detail before No. 1 seed SU’s (19-14, 10-8 Atlantic Coast) 90-77 win over No. 8 seed North Carolina-Greensboro (25-10, 14-4 Southern) on Wednesday night in the Carrier Dome in the first round of the NIT. After one game with the new rules, Boeheim came to his own conclusions.“I don’t know what it’s for, I don’t know where it came from or why,” Boeheim said referring to a rule that affects when teams shoot free throws. “It makes no sense.”The rule change was a shift in the resetting of team fouls from halftime to every 10 minutes of game time. When playing under the normal rule, each team is allowed six team fouls before the opposition shoots one-and-one free throws (meaning one shot is granted and if it’s made, the second one is earned) beginning with the seventh team foul in a half. Once 10 team fouls in a half are reached, the opposition earns two free throws with each foul.Under the experimental rules being used for the NIT, two free throws are granted once the opposition reaches four team fouls. But those team fouls reset after each of the four 10-minute segments in the game.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I don’t think the four-foul rule is a good rule at all,” Boeheim said. “Say you get (four), but you get the (fourth) one just after 10 (minutes into a half) and now they get (four) more, so you don’t get a free throw for 10 minutes.”Under the regular rules, Boeheim explained that once a team starts racking up fouls, it’s easier to earn free throws quicker rather than having to restart halfway through a half.“Now, it punishes you because now there’s no more free throws,” Boeheim said. “… You might get around four in eight or 10 minutes because they usually give a couple, the next couple and that seventh one usually comes, you get one-and-ones for six minutes. The way this works out, you might not get the two-shot foul possibly.”Sophomore forward Tyler Lydon said he thinks the rule is interesting. It helps teams get to the bonus quicker, he said, but defensively, forces players to avoid weak fouls away from the basket more than they already would.“Offensively it works out well for you. You get more shots, you can be more aggressive,” Lydon said, “but defensively it kind of makes you more hesitant to make plays because your team only has three fouls or whatever and a guy goes up and try to play it more straight or stop doing little ticky-tack fouls so I don’t know how much I really like it.”The rule came into play twice for the Orange on Wednesday night. With just under five minutes to play in the first half, Tyler Roberson grabbed a rebound and got fouled. It was the Spartans’ eighth team foul of the half, but instead of shooting a one-and-one, Roberson shot two. He missed both, but under the regular rules, the ball would have been live after the first miss.MORE COVERAGEGallery: Syracuse stiff-arms North Carolina-Greensboro, 90-77, in NIT openerWhat Syracuse players did during snowstorm StellaSyracuse fights off NCAA Tournament disappointment to beat UNC-Greensboro, 90-77, in NIT openerAssistant coach Gerry McNamara fueled Andrew White to break his single-season 3-point recordThe Final Word: Beat writers discuss takeaways from Syracuse’s 90-77 win over UNC-Greensborolast_img read more

Adnan Ćatić in football charity event with Podolski, Schumacher, Lewandowski

first_imgBiH boxer and humanitarian Adnan Ćatić will participate in the new charity event which will be held on 20 May, reports reprezentacija.baAfter he donated 11 000 USD to Sarajevo home for children without parents ‘Bjelave’ Adnan Ćatić will participate in charity match for German children which will be played on 20 May in German Cologne together with Lukas Podolski, Michael Schumacher, Boris Becker, Lothar Matthaus, Roberta Lewandowski, Thomasa Hassler.last_img

GAELIC GAMES: MAYO JUST TOO GOOD FOR DONEGAL LADIES

first_imgDONEGAL’S senior Ladies team were edged out in a tough game against Mayo today.The home side eventually won out by 2-15 to 1-09, but the scoreline probably flattered the Mayo ladies in the encounter in Claremorris.Donegal had started the game well, with the irrepressible Geraldine McLaughlin scoring a goal to give the visitors the lead. But that was as good as it was going to get in the difficult conditions as Mayo came roaring back.Mayo’s eight-time Allstar Cora Staunton scored 1-09 for her county.Aileen Gilroy added 1-01 hosts including a brilliant second half goal.Donegal lost goalkeeper and captain Roisin McCafferty to an early injury which was a serious blow.  GAELIC GAMES: MAYO JUST TOO GOOD FOR DONEGAL LADIES was last modified: February 17th, 2013 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:GAELIC GAMES: MAYO JUST TOO GOOD FOR DONEGAL LADIESlast_img read more