THE MUSIC OF RANDY TRAVIS WILL BE AT VICTORY THEATRE OCTOBER 17, 2019

first_imgBorn Randy Traywick on May 4, 1959, in Marshville, N.C., Travis grew up on a rural farm and began performing as a child with his brother Ricky as The Traywick Brothers. Travis often clashed with his father and dropped out of school, getting into scrapes with the law that continued until he won a Country Music singing contest at a club in Charlotte.Travis moved to Nashville in 1982 to pursue a recording deal. He was hired at The Nashville Palace to sing and cook. After initial failures in North Carolina and Nashville – Travis says he was turned down by every label in town at least once for being too Country – the singer recorded Live at The Nashville Palace and he got a deal with Warner Bros. Records where he was championed and signed by Martha Sharp.Travis’ first single, “On the Other Hand,” barely registered on the charts in 1985, but the next, “1982,” rose to the Top10. Warner Bros. re-released “On the Other Hand” and it quickly became Travis’ first No. 1 single, beginning a run of 10out of 12 chart-toppers. The subsequent album Storms of Life was the first of six straight Platinum certifications for sales in excess of 1 million units and announced Travis as an exciting new voice. He would win the Horizon Award for best new artist at that year’s CMA Awards.“Forever and Ever, Amen,” the first single from his 1987 album Always & Forever, also went to No. 1 and helped Travis score the first of seven career Grammy Awards. Always & Forever also took Album of the Year at the 1987 CMA Awards and Travis also won Male Vocalist of the Year and Single of the Year.With his next four albums – Old 8×10, No Holdin’ Back, Heroes & Friends, and High Lonesome –Travis would go on to have 16 No. 1 songs, charting more than 50, and selling more than 24 million albums. The singer pursued an acting career in the 1990s and scored several major motion picture and television roles, including “The Rainmaker” with Matt Damon and a run of several “Touched By an Angel” episodes.Travis turned primarily to gospel music around the turn of the century, giving his career an unexpected boost with the release of iconic single “Three Wooden Crosses” in 2002. The song went to No. 1 on the Country and Christian charts and was the 2003 CMA Awards Song of the Year. Travis earned eight Platinum certifications and four Gold records in his career and is one of Country’s top-selling artists.The 56-year-old singer’s public performance career was put on hold in 2013 when Travis, who was then living in Texas, suffered a stroke as a result of a viral infection in his heart. With doctors telling the family that hope was virtually lost, he has fought back harder than ever and is now able to walk. His speech and singing continue to improve with hopes of being back in front of his loyal fans one day soon.He is currently living on his ranch in Texas with his wife Mary Davis-Travis, where he continues physical rehabilitation and has been making special appearances around the country. In May of 2019, Randy released his memoir, “Forever and Ever, Amen: A Memoir of Music, Faith and Braving the Storms of Life” with Ken Abraham. The long-awaited, deeply personal story of one of American music’s greatest icons, a remarkable tale of the utmost heights of fame and success, the deepest lows of life’s sorrows, and a miraculous return from the brink of death—told as only Randy Travis can. page1image66647360 FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare THE MUSIC OF RANDY TRAVIS WITH THE ORIGINAL R.T. BAND – FEATURING GUEST VOCALIST JAMES DUPRÉVICTORY THEATRE – OCTOBER 17TICKETS GO ON SALE FRIDAY, AUGUST 23 – 10 AMEvansville, IN– Victory Theatre is excited to add The Music of Randy Travis to their fall lineup. This will be the first time Randy Travis and his band has toured in 5 1⁄2 years. The Music of Randy Travis will have the original Randy Travis band and feature guest vocalist James Dupré who will perform all sixteen #1 Randy Travis hits and include a special appearance with Randy Travis, himself.About Randy TravisVery few figures in Country Music stand out as signposts along the way, the trendsetters who fearlessly predict and influence the future of the genre. Randy Travis is one of these performers and his impact still reverberates in the modern-vs.-traditional ebb and flow of popular trends.Blessed with a voice straight from the church altar, Travis immediately reminded fans of Country Music’s roots when his songs came to popular attention for the first time in the mid- 1980s after years of rejection. A soothing salve in the aftermath of “Urban Cowboy,” Travis’ voice helped launch the corrective Neotraditionalist movement with the heartfelt country and gospel songs that sounded so earnest and honest because it turned out the North Carolina- the born singer had lived those hard times and sometimes found the redemption he sang about.last_img read more

Broadway Grosses: Hamilton Remains Non-Stop

first_img View Comments Phillipa Soo & Lin-Manuel Miranda in ‘Hamilton'(Photo: Joan Marcus) Lin-Manuel Miranda took a bow in his masterpiece Hamilton for one last time on July 9, which also marked the conclusion of Tony winner Leslie Odom Jr. and Philippa Soo’s runs in the blockbuster musical. As audiences—determined not to throw away their shot at catching the three original leads—flocked to the Richard Rodgers Theatre, the show reached its highest gross yet and was the only production this week to surpass its potential. While they will be missed, the tuner will undoubtedly remain a usual suspect on the boards for some time. The Lion King still claimed the throne as the top-grossing show, and perennial hits Wicked, Aladdin and The Book of Mormon joined them in the top spots. Meanwhile, She Loves Me, following a live-streamed performance, ended its limited run with its biggest week at $712,072 and a capacity of 98.51%.Here’s a look at who was on top—and who was not—for the week ending July 10:FRONTRUNNERS (By Gross)1. The Lion King ($2,255,572)2. Hamilton ($2,053,263)3. Wicked ($1,758,107)4. Aladdin ($1,591,362)5. The Book of Mormon ($1,322,710)UNDERDOGS (By Gross)5. Jersey Boys ($489,255)4. Fully Committed ($395,188)3. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time ($369,489)2. Fun Home ($320,261)1. An Act of God ($284,709)*FRONTRUNNERS (By Capacity)1. The Book of Mormon (102.46%)2. Hamilton (101.75%)3. The Humans (99.02%)4. She Loves Me (98.51%)5. The Lion King (97.18%)UNDERDOGS (By Capacity)5. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (62.39%)4. An American in Paris (61.27%)3. Paramour (60.50%)2. Jersey Boys (58.45%)1. On Your Feet! (52.79%)* Number based on seven regular performancesSource: The Broadway Leaguelast_img read more

Gov. Wolf, Secretary Levine Provide Updated Guidance, Stress Need for Compliance as Cases Rise

first_imgGov. Wolf, Secretary Levine Provide Updated Guidance, Stress Need for Compliance as Cases Rise SHARE Email Facebook Twitter March 20, 2020center_img Press Release,  Public Health Updated Business GuidanceBusiness Waiver Application FormFAQ on Business GuidanceGovernor Tom Wolf and Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine provided an update today on their orders to close all non-life-sustaining businesses in Pennsylvania at 8 p.m. yesterday, March 19, as the state seeks relief to save lives, stop the spread of COVID-19 and help workers and businesses through this challenging and quickly changing situation.“Yesterday, I made the difficult decision to order the closure of the physical locations of businesses that are not critical to sustaining life in a pandemic, and to practice social distancing for all others,” said Governor Wolf. “We’re in an unprecedented crisis and we need to use every tool at our disposal. The difficult decisions we make now will make it possible for our health care workers to manage this crisis as we see the full brutality of the virus in the coming weeks.”The orders to close the physical locations of all non-life-sustaining business took effect at 8 p.m. last night, March 19. Enforcement actions against businesses that do not close physical locations will begin at 12:01 a.m. Saturday, March 21. Businesses are encouraged to use virtual or telework operations if they can do so.A list of both life-sustaining and non-life-sustaining businesses is here. Business guidance has been updated after conversations with businesses, stakeholders, and individuals—in consultation with the Department of Health—and has been aligned with the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency advisory released yesterday.This is an evolving situation and decisions will continue to be made and revisited as needed. If a business listed for closure believes it could help mitigate this crisis by providing a life sustaining service, it can seek an exemption. Businesses can get a waiver application through the Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED) website. or may contact the Department of Community and Economic Development at [email protected] or by calling 1-877-PA-HEALTH and selecting option 1.“I was a business owner for much of my adult life and I understand your concerns,” said Gov. Wolf. “These are uncharted waters and we’re going to do everything we can to help the people and businesses of Pennsylvania.”DCED offers working capital loans that could be of assistance to businesses impacted by COVID-19. Resources and information will be posted to http://dced.pa.gov/resources as they become available. Governor Wolf announced yesterday the availability of low-interest loans for small businesses and eligible non-profits in all 67 counties in Pennsylvania through the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA).The spread of COVID-19 is increasing at an exponential pace, especially in urban areas and southeast Pennsylvania. New cases are beginning to appear in other counties, which suggests community spread. The Department of Health reported earlier today there were 83 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the statewide total to 268 Pennsylvanians who have tested positive in 26 counties.“While we continue to be concerned about the spread of this virus to seniors, a preliminary analysis from the CDC this week shows that 20 percent of all hospitalized patients in the U.S. are between 20 and 44 years old,” said Dr. Rachel Levine. “We are seriously concerned that individuals in their 20 to 44 age range are not heeding the message to stay home and are creating an unnecessary risk to themselves and others.”The Department of Health is working with health systems and hospitals to determine their current abilities to handle a surge of people needing hospitalization and the commonwealth is looking for all options to add capacity for the health care system to care for a surge of Pennsylvanians needing care.“There is one way to make sure people don’t need to be hospitalized and we don’t strain our health care system: Stay calm. Stay home. Stay safe,” said Dr. Levine.last_img read more

Puckett a true baseball legend

first_imgThere are those memories in our sports childhood that will be etched in our minds forever.Many them include our icons in games or performances which epitomized their careers, and especially times when our favorite teams or players won on their sport’s grandest stage.For me, those memories include Steve Young winning the 1994 Super Bowl against the Chargers and when Duke won the National Championship in 2001.There are also those memories that will forever be engrained in our brains which we could only wish never happened.I remember how upset I was when Duke fell to UConn in 1999 and being on the verge of tears when — yes, at one point I followed NASCAR — Dale Earnhardt went into the wall at Daytona in what turned out to be his final race.But there is one sports moment that leaves those other memories in its dust. In fact, without it, who knows if those memories or my love for sports would even exist? Perhaps I wouldn’t even be reading the sports page, let alone be writing for it.In Game Seven of the 1991 World Series between Minnesota and Atlanta, the Twins’ Jack Morris was outstanding on the hill and I will never forget when Dan Gladden’s trotted home from third base on a single to left by pinch-hitter Gene Larkin to win it for the Fall Classic for the Twin Cities.The celebration ensued as my team had just won the World Series. I was seven years old, so it was the first World Series that I can remember, but I feel safe in saying that it will be my favorite one for as long as I can live.But Game Seven really only belongs with the happy memories listed above. It’s Game Six that sits atop my list of greatest games ever, and it will be hard for any future contest to surpass it.A certain happy-go-lucky center fielder stole the show at the Metrodome. In the third inning, he showed off why he earned six Gold Gloves when he seemingly jumped seven feet off the ground to snag a ball off the plexiglass to rob Atlanta’s Ron Gant of an extra-base hit.I bit my nails sitting on the edge of my seat as the game went into a 10th inning and then the 11th. Tens of thousands of Homer Hankys waved as the same center fielder led off the bottom half of the 11th frame against freshly inserted starter-turned-reliever Charlie Leibrandt.They continued to wave after he took ball one. On the next pitch he belted the ball to present-day Home Run Porch. A simple swing and Game Seven became a reality. “And we’ll see you tomorrow night!” legendary announced Jack Buck proclaimed.All that Kirby Puckett did in that game outside of the miraculous catch was go 3-for-4 — just missing the cycle by a double — with two runs and three RBIs, while adding a sacrifice and a stolen base.The numbers can string on forever. With his career shortened to 12 years, Puckett never ceased to amaze. He finished with more than 2,300 hits and more than 200 homers, over 1,000 RBIs and a career batting average of .318. And most people don’t realize the short, stocky man also had 134 stolen bases.There are even more numbers on my part: I have more than 150 Puckett baseball cards at home, three of them signed by him to go along with numerous posters and other memorabilia. I don’t know how many hours I spent following his short career.But as unfair as it seemed that his career was cut short, it was even more devastating Monday, when his life was cut short, one week shy of his 46th birthday.As much as it hurt when he was forced to retire and as much as it hurt Monday, I didn’t find myself that upset. After all, it’s hard to believe that the Puck would want me — or any of his fans — to wallow in our sorrows for an extended period of time.Just one thought of that wide smile of his — you know which one I’m talking about — made me realize that he would want his life celebrated.That’s what the 10-time All-Star was all about, and that’s why kids — especially this one — loved him. As someone who was just starting to play the game when he had that unbelievable Game Six performance, watching him perform that day, and every day, with a smile on his face made us realize what playing baseball was all about.Even when glaucoma forced him into retirement, he didn’t let the disease bring him down. Instead he remained an inspiration to us all.”Don’t take life for granted because tomorrow isn’t promised for any of us,” Puckett said at a ceremony in 1996.Despite a less-than unblemished record after hanging up his jersey, Puck always remained, and always will be my hero. Rest in peace, Number 34, may we all smile as wide as you and if I touch the lives of one-tenth of the people that you did, I’ll consider my life a success.Eric Schmoldt is a senior majoring in history. Share is his celebration of Kirby Puckett’s life by sharing your memories at [email protected]last_img read more

February sees extremely high building numbers

first_imgWhile not quite as dramatic, there is also an eye-popping difference in the year-over-year city revenue numbers.So far this year, the building permits have generated $506,620 for city hall.That is nearly 16 times more than the $31,792 generated in the first two months of 2010.It is also more than double the full 12-month total last year, which was $231,437.Advertisement Last month’s issuance of the final building permit for the new hospital has dramatically skewed comparisons of building numbers in Fort St. John.February’s total value of construction is $271,146,000.- Advertisement -That’s nearly 33 times the total for the same month last year, which was just over $8 million.However, all but $546,000 of last month’s total was for the new hospital permit, which was worth $270,600,000.That’s nearly 12 times more than the last big local commercial permit issued for the Enerplex, for just over $23 million dollars, in March of 2008.In addition, the 2011 two-month total value of construction in the city is nearly six times last year’s 12-month total, which was $46,455,000.Advertisementlast_img read more