Bar investments post gains

first_imgA new investment policy begun by the Bar almost 12 years ago has weathered two recessions while more than doubling the Bar’s initial investment.And despite turbulent markets in recent months, it has made money for the Bar in the past year.Investment Committee Chair David Bianchi told the Board of Governors recently that the Bar started in September 1990 with an investment account of $9.2 million. The new policy allowed the Bar to invest in stocks and bonds, where previously it had been restricted to certificates of deposit.Since that time, the Bar has earned $9.8 million, of which about $5 million has been used to finance continuing Bar operations and the remainder left in the investment pool, which is now nearly $14 million, Bianchi said.In the past 12 months, the Bar has received a 5.8-percent return, he said, while the indexes the Bar uses to measure performance have averaged 3.8 percent.The committee recommended, and the board approved, a change in the way short-term investments are made. Bianchi said the Bar’s financial advisors recommended no longer investing in short-term commercial notes, but continuing to invest in money market accounts while adding one-to-three year term U.S. Treasury notes and bonds in a bond mutual fund. Bar investments post gains June 15, 2002 Regular Newscenter_img Bar investments post gainslast_img read more

NASA Drops Racially Charged Nicknames of Celestial Bodies

first_imgFor example, “Eskimo Nebula” and “Siamese Twins Galaxy” will no longer be used.“Nicknames are often more approachable and public-friendly than official names for cosmic objects, such as Barnard 33, whose nickname ‘the Horsehead Nebula’ invokes its appearance,” NASA said in a release last week. “But often seemingly innocuous nicknames can be harmful and detract from the science.”Additionally, NASA is examining its use of phrases for planets, galaxies and other cosmic objects “as part of its commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion.”As we work to identify & address systemic discrimination & inequality in all aspects of the scientific community, we are reexamining the use of unofficial terminology for cosmic objects which can be not only insensitive, but actively harmful. Read more: https://t.co/ZNicp5g0Wh pic.twitter.com/jDup6JOGBd— NASA (@NASA) August 5, 2020 NASA is apparently taking a cue from grocery store items, pro sports teams, and country music bands which have all removed racially insensitive names in recent weeks and months.The space agency just announced it is adding celestial bodies to the list that already includes Aunt Jemima, the Washington Football Team and hitmakers The Chicks and Lady A. The space agency goes on to say that it “will use only the official, International Astronomical Union designations in cases where nicknames are inappropriate.”Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington, DC, explains, “Science is for everyone, and every facet of our work needs to reflect that value.”Last June, Dreyer’s Grand Ice Cream said it was dropping the brand “Eskimo Pie” after a century. The word is commonly used in Alaska to refer to Inuit and Yupik people, according to the Alaska Native Language Center at the University of Alaska.“This name is considered derogatory in many other places because it was given by non-Inuit people and was said to mean ‘eater of raw meat,’” the company stated at the time.“Siamese twins” is considered to be an antiquated expression for conjoined twins, based on brothers from Siam (now Thailand) who were used as sideshow freaks in the 19th century.last_img read more

Mourinho to intensify his pursuit for Rooney, says “there’s no time limit”

first_imgChelsea boss Jose Mourinho claims “there is no time limit” for the club’s pursuit of Manchester United’s Wayne Rooney.Rooney has been strongly linked with a move to Stamford Bridge after Chelsea lodged a bid for the unsettled forward.United have repeatedly insisted the striker is not for sale, but Mourinho insists he has no plans to give up on his target.“There is no time limit,” said Mourinho.“We have our squad of strikers. We have identified the player as one we would look to have with us.”The interest is believed to frustrate United with the Premier League champions continuing to be adamant that they have no intention of letting Rooney go. But Mourinho believes Chelsea have acted properly in their dealings, having done all of their activity through the official channels.He added: “We are doing things legally, making the official bid directly to the club, no interviews or comments or direct relations with the player, no contact, absolutely nothing.“We have done it in an ethical way and we are going to do that until the last day. And we will see how it comes.”last_img read more