Dem policies based on intimidation

first_imgThe German Nazi Party was, more precisely, the National Socialist Party. It’s obvious that in the United States in 2016, the nationwide socialist party is the Democratic Party. One of its contestants for the presidential nomination was an avowed socialist and the other advocated very much the same policies.The Italian fascists and the Nazis both rose to power by intimidating any opposition by orchestrating mobs, which shouted down and attacked those whom they feared. They both demonized the perceived wealthy and promised to redistribute their assets to their adherents.Like the Nazi and fascist parties, the Democrats argue they’re for taxing the few and helping the many, If one looks at statistics, the correlation of high rates of poverty, water and air pollution, failing infrastructure and uncontrolled gun violence with long periods of Democratic governance is evident.The assertion that they’re helping these people may be judged by the words of one who was for the poor. Jesus said (Matthew 7-20) “By their fruits ye shall know them.”Art HenningsonScotia There has been a concerted effort by leftist groups to suppress speech in the United States. They shout down, intimidate and physically attack those with whom they disagree. “Resist,” said Hillary. They label speakers with whom they disagree as “racist,” “KKK,” “Nazis” or “fascists.” Views with which they differ are called “hate speech.”Curiously, it’s the Democratic Party that advocates discrimination based on one’s appearance, heritage, language or perceived race. Black- and brown-skinned people are also favored over pink and yellow skin in hiring, college admissions and even in decisions by correction officials.From a historical perspective, slavery was supported almost unanimously by Democrats in both the North and the South prior to 1861. The “Jim Crow” laws and segregation were created in the South by governments controlled by Democrats. In practice, the KKK was the military arm of the Southern Democratic Party. These Democrats, like Black Lives Matter and the Antifas, call people fascist, but they act like fascists themselves. Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinioncenter_img More from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusSchenectady teens accused of Scotia auto theft, chase; Ended in Clifton Park crash, Saratoga Sheriff…last_img read more

MMT Scoops Up 10 New Contracts

first_imgMMT said it has secured 10 new subsea survey and inspection projects within the offshore wind, renewable energy and oil and gas industry.The contracts, won in the past two months, are for old and new clients such as Siccar Point Energy, Equinor, Perenco, SSE, Örsted, Vattenfall, GreenLink Interconnector, National Grid, Wintershall and BP Trinidad.Some of the contracts are in joint collaboration with MMT’s Norwegian partner Reach Subsea.The Swedish subsea survey specialist noted it will deliver its survey solution Surveyor Interceptor ROV in several projects this summer and autumn.last_img read more

South Florida turtle dies after eating 104 pieces of plastic

first_imgA reminder to Floridians to think of the turtles!Gumbo Limbo Nature Center in Boca Raton posted a photo on Facebook Tuesday showing a tiny turtle that had eaten 104 pieces of plastic and tragically passed away.In the picture, the small chunks of plastic are lined up next to the turtle.Gumbo Limbo said this time of year is known as “washback” season, meaning turtles that have ventured out to sea are starting to wash back up along our coast.The nature center said 100 percent of washback turtles that have plastic in their intestinal tracts don’t survive, like the turtle in the Facebook post.“This is a sad reminder that we all need to do our part to keep our oceans plastic free,” Gumbo Limbo wrote.last_img read more

Jim Boeheim on the NIT’s experimental rules: ‘It makes no sense’

first_img Published on March 15, 2017 at 11:51 pm Contact Paul: [email protected] | @pschweds Facebook Twitter Google+ The second occurrence came with over 12 minutes left in the second half, when Lydon drew UNCG’s fifth foul of the 10-minute segment after grabbing a defensive rebound. He converted both free throws.With the Orange pulling away for most of the second half, the change in free-throw situations didn’t affect the outcome of the game. But as SU’s march toward the NIT crown continues it could be a factor down the line, a factor that Boeheim doesn’t like. Commentscenter_img Prior to Syracuse’s opening game in the National Invitation Tournament, head coach Jim Boeheim said he wasn’t sure what to expect from the tournament’s experimental rules.Boeheim and his staff mentioned the rules to the SU players, although they didn’t go into great detail before No. 1 seed SU’s (19-14, 10-8 Atlantic Coast) 90-77 win over No. 8 seed North Carolina-Greensboro (25-10, 14-4 Southern) on Wednesday night in the Carrier Dome in the first round of the NIT. After one game with the new rules, Boeheim came to his own conclusions.“I don’t know what it’s for, I don’t know where it came from or why,” Boeheim said referring to a rule that affects when teams shoot free throws. “It makes no sense.”The rule change was a shift in the resetting of team fouls from halftime to every 10 minutes of game time. When playing under the normal rule, each team is allowed six team fouls before the opposition shoots one-and-one free throws (meaning one shot is granted and if it’s made, the second one is earned) beginning with the seventh team foul in a half. Once 10 team fouls in a half are reached, the opposition earns two free throws with each foul.Under the experimental rules being used for the NIT, two free throws are granted once the opposition reaches four team fouls. But those team fouls reset after each of the four 10-minute segments in the game.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I don’t think the four-foul rule is a good rule at all,” Boeheim said. “Say you get (four), but you get the (fourth) one just after 10 (minutes into a half) and now they get (four) more, so you don’t get a free throw for 10 minutes.”Under the regular rules, Boeheim explained that once a team starts racking up fouls, it’s easier to earn free throws quicker rather than having to restart halfway through a half.“Now, it punishes you because now there’s no more free throws,” Boeheim said. “… You might get around four in eight or 10 minutes because they usually give a couple, the next couple and that seventh one usually comes, you get one-and-ones for six minutes. The way this works out, you might not get the two-shot foul possibly.”Sophomore forward Tyler Lydon said he thinks the rule is interesting. It helps teams get to the bonus quicker, he said, but defensively, forces players to avoid weak fouls away from the basket more than they already would.“Offensively it works out well for you. You get more shots, you can be more aggressive,” Lydon said, “but defensively it kind of makes you more hesitant to make plays because your team only has three fouls or whatever and a guy goes up and try to play it more straight or stop doing little ticky-tack fouls so I don’t know how much I really like it.”The rule came into play twice for the Orange on Wednesday night. With just under five minutes to play in the first half, Tyler Roberson grabbed a rebound and got fouled. It was the Spartans’ eighth team foul of the half, but instead of shooting a one-and-one, Roberson shot two. He missed both, but under the regular rules, the ball would have been live after the first miss.MORE COVERAGEGallery: Syracuse stiff-arms North Carolina-Greensboro, 90-77, in NIT openerWhat Syracuse players did during snowstorm StellaSyracuse fights off NCAA Tournament disappointment to beat UNC-Greensboro, 90-77, in NIT openerAssistant coach Gerry McNamara fueled Andrew White to break his single-season 3-point recordThe Final Word: Beat writers discuss takeaways from Syracuse’s 90-77 win over UNC-Greensborolast_img read more

‘My head is in Manchester’ – United goalkeeper rubbishes exit rumours

first_img1 Manchester United goalkeeper Sergio Romero has denied rumours he will return to his former club River Plate in the summer.The Argentine shot-stopper has played second fiddle to David de Gea this season, having made just 10 appearances for the first team.Even if De Gea departs this summer, United are unlikely to promote Romero to first choice, which has left the 29-year-old’s future in doubt.However, Romero has insisted he is content with life at Old Trafford and no move is currently on the cards.“Nobody has contacted me,” Romero told ESPN.“My head is placed in Manchester. In the matches I have played I’ve proved I can do well.” Sergio Romero during training for Manchester United last_img read more