USSOUTHCOM Honors Partner Nation Liaison Officers

first_imgBy Dialogo February 13, 2012 February 10 marked the culmination to their assignments as Military Liaison Officers to the U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) for Brazilian Navy Commander Paulo Petró, Peruvian Army Colonel Juan Carlos Liendo and Chilean Navy Captain Luis Felipe Bravo. SOUTHCOM honored the country representatives in a ceremony to thank them for their service and bid them farewell. U.S. Air Force General Douglas Fraser, USSOUTHCOM Commander also recognized their distinguished service by awarding Cmdr. Petró and Capt. Bravo with a Joint Service Commendation Medal on behalf of the Secretary of Defense. In his opening remarks, Gen. Fraser said, “This program is very important to the United States…the benefit we gain mutually will pay us dividends in the future,” and was quick to add that the relationships established with the liaison officers and the work achieved together have already paid both sides important dividends. “We have learned a great deal from each other as we worked with the Armed Forces of their countries.” The same medal was presented to Col. Liendo in a previous ceremony on February 3, by U.S. Air Force Brigadier General Steven Shepro, Director of SOUTHCOM’s Strategy, Policy and Plans directorate, according to a press release published by the command’s Public Affairs Office. The Partner Nation Liaison Officer (PNLO) Program began in 1998 with a focus on fostering a better understanding among partner nations and facilitating the ability to integrate and synchronize operations among them by assisting in the transfer of vital information, enhancing mutual trust and developing an increased level of teamwork among the countries. Since then, according to the press release, seven South American countries, in addition to Canada have assigned military liaison officers to the command. Cmdr. Petró, a Marine officer and naval aviator (helicopter) who celebrated 28 years in the Brazilian Military on the same day, was assigned to SOUTHCOM on February 7, 2011, and will head back to his home country as Commander of the Amphibious Assault Vehicular Battalion in Rio de Janeiro. “As an aviator I have flown across open seas, over the Amazon jungle and over the snowy southern Andes, but if I have to mention one highlight in my career, it would have to be my time in Miami as part of the SOUTHCOM family,” said the Brazilian helicopter pilot, while stressing his admiration for “the U.S. for the bravery of the American people.” Chilean Submariner, Capt. Bravo, served as PNLO to SOUTHCOM since February 13, 2010, providing invaluable service as the primary link to the Chilean Command Authorities during the 8.8-magnitude earthquake that struck his country only 10 days after his arrival to Miami. Capt. Bravo thanked his family and the command staff, expressing, “All of you [the U.S.] bring hope to many nations; you really, truly foster regional stability with your efforts in the region.” “You make this world a better place in which to live and I feel honored to walk alongside you,” he concluded. Capt. Bravo’s next assignment will be as member of the Staff to the Chilean Commander of Naval Operations in Valparaiso, Chile. Col. Liendo, a fully qualified Military Intelligence Officer and Professor at the Peruvian Army’s Command and General Staff College, Military Academy and Intelligence and Analysis School in Military Intelligence, History and Strategy, served SOUTHCOM since February 8, 2010 and retired from his military career on December 31, 2011. In addition to serving as advisor to various directorates within the command, Col. Liendo also contributed greatly to a CHDS Seminar on Security and Defense during his assignment to SOUTHCOM.last_img read more

Man Charged For Striking Woman, Child In Hotel

first_img(Photo: Greensburg Daily News)GREENSBURG – A 27-year-old man is accused of assaulting a woman and young child inside of a Greensburg hotel room.Greensburg Daily News reports Bryce D. Wesseler was charged Friday with felony domestic battery, criminal confinement and battery on a child.Police say they picked up Wesseler after he left the Quality Inn & Suites in Greensburg around 8:30 p.m. Thursday.The female victim told investigating officers that she went into the hotel bathroom to gather personal belongings and he wouldn’t let her leave, leading to a verbal argument.It eventually turned physical when she expressed desire to leave the hotel room.Wesseler allegedly threw her on the floor and used his hand to muffle her cries for help, police said.A 4-year-old child was trying to help the woman when Wesseler shoved the adolescent into a wall.The child, who suffered swelling and redness in the forehead, told a hotel employee, “he [Wesseler] is always mean to us,” the newspaper reports.A guest at the hotel overheard the incident and told an employee. The hotel worker said she got to the room and saw a naked man on top of a woman allegedly holding her down and choking her. The employee then called police.Wesseler left the hotel wearing only a pair of jeans and was later found and arrested by police.He had scratches on his head from the altercation but did not seek treatment. According to the newspaper, he was breathalyzed and registered .10 percent.A trial date has been set for late January and court documents reveal Wesseler is not allowed to have contact with the victims in the case.last_img read more

Olympic Channel to embrace esports after Pyeongchang

first_imgThe Olympic Channel will be looking at using esports to engage young audiences after the Pyeongchang Olympics. A digital platform launched in 2016 with a $450 million (£320.8m) budget, The Olympic Channel has been tasked with keeping young people interested in sport.Yiannis Exarchos, The Olympic ChannelEsports was finally recognised as a sport by the International Olympic Committee in November last year, and this step is another positive sign for the industry’s future. Esports is on its way to become a billion dollar market, so it’s not too hard to see why traditional sports is opening its arms to it after years of skepticism.Yiannis Exarchos, Executive Director of The Olympic Channel explained: “As a youthful digital platform we cannot ignore the phenomenon of esports. With the channel after the Games we want to explore the area of esports more deeply.”“Esports is still a very male dominated area, 85 percent to 15 percent,” he continued. “Secondly a lot of the content is quite violent or has the violence narrative engrained to it. This is obviously very foreign to what the Olympics represent.”Exarchos doesn’t think those hurdles will get it esports’ way, though. “I don’t believe any of those three current limitations are not addressable. I believe it is a movement that has emerged out of nowhere without necessarily clear directions.”Esports Insider says: An official channel for the Olympics embracing esports is just another step in the right direction for competitive gaming. If it proves to be a success, it’d be hard to ignore esports as a viable inclusion to the Olympics in the future as has been much discussed. What form this would take of course, is very much up in the air.last_img read more

Only a fraction of Guyanese get into crime (part 1)

first_imgDear Editor,I would like to dwell on a letter which captions “Give ghetto youths a ladder to climb out of that despair “by Dr Mark Devonish so as to put the murderous crime situation that has engulfed this country into perspective. The world needs to be informed that in this country, hardhearted bandits chronically kick down the doors of helpless citizens to gain access to their homes to brutalise, rob and murder them. Of course, such a problem tarnishes our national image, divides Guyanese and destroys our economy. So, there is nothing good about crime. Also, I would like to remind Dr Devonish that the majority of Guyanese never fall into crime, even though Guyana is poverty-stricken and most communities can be described as ghetto-like.If anything, poverty should at least instinctively drive Guyanese into survival mode to unite as one, to work hard, to make sacrifices, to penny- pinch, to show empathy and to respect others but never to engage in inhumanity.And most Guyanese have been doing exactly this.  I remember how my family made our meals without oil and various necessary ingredients to cut cost and to save money for our house rent which was our priority.Also, I remember walking miles and miles to and from my school even in bad weather so that I could hold onto money to buy school supplies etc. And in spite of having very little, we tried our best to save for a rainy day.In short, we handle poverty though thrifty means, personal sacrifice and hard work. Such values enable us to survive on our own sweat and I am extremely proud of this.  So Dr Devonish, even if we did not raid trash cans like you did, it does not mean that our lives are great.We also never entertained the idea of doing anything criminal because we are cultured to see crime as inhumane and shameful. These are part of our value system that steers us away from crime. And in the face of our difficulties, I am understandably angry that we also become victims of brutal criminals who are nothing but lawless bullies.This then sparks all sorts of logical questions, including why is it that only some Guyanese fall into crime and the majority of us don’t, even though we are all sailing in rough waters?And the answer primarily lies in the differences in our values, not poverty. Examples of this analysis are practically seen everywhere in this country.  Editor, just look around you and you will see that most Guyanese lives in poverty but only a fraction get into crime and destroy this country.  Any behaviourists would agree that human behaviours are driven by good and bad moral values. Good moral values entail: respecting others, working hard for success and living off of one’s own sweat. Bad moral values are the opposite.Sincerely,Annie Baliramlast_img read more