Tim Palmieri And Upstate Rubdown To Join Kitchen Dwellers in NYC

first_imgLast month, Bozeman, MT-based bluegrass outfit Kitchen Dwellers announced a full slate of Fall tour dates, with a headlining gig on Friday, November 11th at New York City jam-friendly venue American Beauty. Today, the group, who was recently on tour with Twiddle, announced that Kung Fu guitarist Tim Palmieri will be joining them for an acoustic support set.In addition to Palmieri, Hudson Valley-based Appalachian soul outfit Upstate Rubdown will also perform an opening set for the Dwellers. The show promises to be a solid night of music with plenty of opportunity for collaboration and jams.Tickets are currently on sale and can be purchased here.For additional event information and updates, check out the Facebook Event page.Kitchen Dwellers “Guilty” – Grand Junction, CO:Tim Palmieri performing Ween’s “Transdermal Celebration”:Upstate Rubdown – Otis Live:last_img read more

FX cap hurts Austrian pension funds’ performance

first_imgA 30% cap on foreign currency exposure has hit Austrian Pensionskassen investment returns in recent years, according to consultancy Mercer.“The cap has limited the domestic pension funds considerably and lost them chances for additional returns,” said Michaela Plank, retirement expert at Mercer Austria.In a low interest rate environment in developed markets it was particularly important for institutional investors to seek returns in other areas of the world, she added.All existing investment caps for Austrian funds will be lifted when the country implements the EU’s IORP II directive, now scheduled for October. The necessary revisions to the Austrian law governing pension funds – known as PKG – was due to pass through parliament before summer but a technicality means it will have to wait till October.However, the Austrian pension fund association FVPK told journalists this week that the amendments, including the abolition of quantitative investment caps, would be agreed on by a majority. Andreas Zakostelsky, FVPKCredit: Franz HelmreichAndreas Zakostelsky, chairman of the FVPK, confirmed that the two coalition parties in the government, the conservative ÖVP and the far-right FPÖ, were “in full agreement” on the package.Regarding other amendments demanded by the IORP II, Austria had “almost no need for amendments”, he added. Most of the EU directive’s standards for transparency, information, governance and risk management are already part of the domestic legal framework.Mercer’s Plank also emphasised that Austrian pension funds already had the risk management in place to be given free rein regarding their investment allocations.Under the proposed amendment to the PKG, every pension fund would have to set down its own allocation guidelines, which would then be approved by the financial market supervisor FMA.Regarding reforms, however, the FVPK was much more excited about next year as the government promised a major tax overhaul. This is expected to include incentives for companies to set up pension plans and an improved tax treatment of additional member contributions.“The time is ripe for a balanced three-pillar pension system,” said Zakostelsky.He said the government had been “pleasantly clear” in its commitment to this goal when it published its agenda last year.So far, however, the coalition was more focused on other topics including Austria holding the rotating EU presidency until December.last_img read more

Base your vote on issues, not religion

first_imgIt’s political suicide for a candidate to disavow religious convictions – every candidate has a bungee attached to some church or temple. At the same time there’s a consensus that a candidate’s theological leanings should be a nonissue while evaluating their fitness for office and their decisions in office. For the sake of this column, I’m going to pretend that I feel sorry for politicians when faced with this conundrum. We tell them they better believe in God, and then we tell them God must wait in the lobby when they enter their chambers of judicial, legislative or executive action. Voters will only elect someone who believes that God is king of kings (including presidents), but they become incensed when elected officials seek to politically live out that which they have professed. Essentially we’re tempting our candidates to be double-minded, or as the Bible puts it, hypocrites. This double-mindedness becomes a significant factor when confronted with electing a Mormon for president. No doubt the majority of evangelicals view Mormonism as a cult and are nervous about the kind of momentum a Mormon president might give an already growing sect – although the election of John F. Kennedy in 1960 didn’t seem to be a boon for Roman Catholicism. Yet we should be equally nervous about electing a candidate who is readily willing to jettison his or her religious convictions because they’re not politically expeditious. Quite frankly, most politicians claiming adherence to mainline world religions, whether Protestant, Roman Catholic or Jewish, have political world views that would be unrecognizable to any faithful member of their church, parish or temple. Of course, that still doesn’t answer the question: Should evangelicals who believe Mormonism to be biblically abhorrent vote for a Mormon? Heretic or hypocrite – it’s a tough choice. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWhicker: Clemson demonstrates that it’s tough to knock out the champMy point so far is that we’re left with picking the lesser of evils. I know many resist this saying, “Picking the lesser of evils is still picking evil.” But given the nature of man, unless you’re going to write in “Jesus,” picking the lesser of evils is a logical necessity. And it would appear that the nature of today’s political landscape increases the amount of evil on the ballot. I am under the somewhat cynical conviction that superstar status, especially in politics, requires a healthy amount of soul-selling. This is nothing new. When Constantine made Christianity the official religion of the Roman Empire in the fourth century, anyone who wanted a position of political power had to make a profession of faith. This not only had a drastically polluting influence upon the church, but it made religious faithfulness a necessary fashion accessory for the upwardly mobile politician. So here we are. Should evangelicals vote for a Mormon? I think a person’s religious convictions are the most important thing in his life. But at the risk of sounding wry, the religious convictions of politicians and other celebrities are so dubious that the amount of disbelief I would need to suspend in order to believe them is more than my tender heart and mind can bear. So I become an issue man. I will vote for the candidate who has the most Christian platform and best promotes, and seeks to live by, Christian ethics. A candidate who is pro-life, pro-marriage, doesn’t believe government should be everyone’s Mary Poppins, will try to protect our nation from invasion and attack and other biblical notions of the purpose of government is my candidate. His heresy or hypocrisy I will leave between him and God. Right now I’m just concerned for my kids. The Rev. Paul Viggiano is pastor of the Branch of Hope Orthodox Presbyterian Church in Torrance (e-mail: [email protected]).160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more