Von Miller’s ankle injury hits kicker Brandon McManus hard

first_imgMiller feels the same way about McManus.“I just picture us with gray hair, out of shape, sitting on the porch somewhere, watching our grandkids play,” Miller has said about his odd-couple friendship with McManus. “That’s just B-Mac and I. I can’t even really remember like the official start of it or anything, but now we have that bond, his family, my family.”McManus said their friendship began in the 2015 offseason.“I’d say it blossomed quickly,” McManus said. “It was like a fast-growing plant. It just needed to be watered a little bit.”“It’s just been awesome to get to know him and his parents over the years and my dad and his dad have become great friends over the years,” McManus added. “So, it’s become a great friendship that I know will continue until we get older together. He’s been a true great friend. He’s the godfather to my second twin. He was the No. 2 draft pick in 2011, so I gave him the second pick, the second baby.” September 12, 2020 One of the few outward things Miller and McManus have in common is their competitive fire.“We both want to be the most successful athlete ever at our positions,” McManus said. “I love being a successful athlete in anything I do and Von’s super competitive as well. He says in interviews all the time he’s mad that I’m good at everything. But that’s just my competitive nature.” “I never want to be looked at as a kicker and I never act like a kicker because that’s not my personality,” added McManus, who signed a four-year, $17.2 million extension Friday night. “It’s just something that I found that I could be really good at and be successful at and play professionally.”NOTES: Coach Vic Fangio said OLB Bradley Chubb (knee) will play Monday night. He’s optimistic WR Courtland Sutton (shoulder) will, too, but “he’s got to pass the most primitive test there is — he’s got to be able to do 10 jumping jacks.” WR K.J. Hamler (hamstring) is questionable and ILB Mark Barron (hamstring) is out.___ Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditENGLEWOOD, Colo. (AP) — Von Miller’s devastating ankle injury six days before Denver’s season opener against Tennessee was especially gut-wrenching for Brandon McManus.They’ve been Broncos BFFs since 2015, this mild-mannered kicker from Pennsylvania and the gregarious superstar linebacker from Dallas.That was the year they helped lead the Broncos on a Super Bowl run, with McManus hitting all 10 of his field goals in the playoffs and Miller destroying game plans and sweeping past tackles trying to keep him off of the quarterback. More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL Miller is looking at months of rehab instead of the monster season that he and so many others were expecting.“It’s super tough,” McManus told The Associated Press. “Everybody knows how hard Von’s been training all offseason, but I knew better than anyone. I was FaceTiming with him when he was out in San Francisco, then in Dallas training and then here in Denver, as well. So, I knew even more the depth that he’s gone into to prime himself for a great year.”McManus said he and Miller talked about how if he had gotten hurt in the opener, at least he would have experienced playing with his newfound physique and psyche.“Even if he got to play three quarters of the first game, just for him to feel like what his body was like for all this work it would have been great,” McManus said. McManus said Miller is already talking about putting that same effort and energy into his rehab for a comeback like Bryant and Jordan did on the basketball court in their day.center_img Associated Press Von Miller’s ankle injury hits kicker Brandon McManus hard Just like he did that year, Miller had a terrific training camp this summer.Inspired by Kobe Bryant’s legacy, Michael Jordan’s documentary and his own bout with the COVID-19, Miller reshaped his body at age 31 and dedicated himself to reclaiming his status as the league’s premier pass rusher.A buff Miller looked as if he had been training for a heavyweight fight and appeared primed for a big year after a camp in which he was routinely removed from drills after a single snap for fear he’d wreck the workouts.Then, Miller took a misstep on the final play at an indoor practice Tuesday and everything changed.He underwent surgery Friday to fix a dislodged tendon in his left foot. “After he got over feeling sorry for himself, he had that opportunity to watch these players who had great comebacks from injuries and that’s what he’s primed to do, and I know that he’ll do that,” McManus said.At best, Miller returns after three months. At worst, he never plays in Denver again. He’s due $18 million next season, the final year of the six-year, $114.1 million deal that he signed after winning Super Bowl 50 MVP honors. Should they part ways in 2021, the Broncos would only take a $4,225,000 salary cap hit.McManus is bummed he won’t have Miller with him on game days this fall.“As a friend, obviously it was upsetting just because I love to have him on the field all the times and during games we get to chat and stuff at certain times and I love watching him play,” McManus said. “Obviously, my position is not as exciting to watch but I truly love watching him play out there, so I’ll miss that.”last_img read more

Syracuse looks to avenge regular-season loss in ACC tournament semifinals matchup with Louisville

first_img Published on November 13, 2014 at 12:19 am Contact Sam: [email protected] | @SamBlum3 Facebook Twitter Google+ Syracuse wasn’t shy about the fact that it wanted Louisville.After the Orange defeated Duke in the quarterfinals of the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament on Sunday, the attention quickly turned to exacting revenge on its most disappointing loss of the season.“I’d love to play them again,” junior goalkeeper Alex Bono said. “Neutral site. Went down a man down there, unfortunately, right or wrong. I’d love to get back after them and get some re-venge.“Just going out there and seeing those red jerseys and walking all over them.”In its best season in program history, Syracuse’s biggest blemish came on Oct. 17, when it lost at Louisville after relenting a one-goal advantage. Cardinals midfielder Tim Kubel tied the game on a penalty kick and SU’s Alex Halis was ejected after receiving a controversial second yellow card with just more than four minutes to play.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textWith the Orange down a man, Louisville’s Jerry Ramirez scored off a free kick six minutes into overtime and then-No. 2 SU’s eight-game winning streak was over. The No. 1 Orange (15-2-1, 5-2-1 ACC), though, has a chance to redeem itself when it travels to Cary, North Carolina to face the sixth-seeded Cardinals (9-6-3, 4-3-1) in the semifinals of the ACC tournament at 8 p.m. on Friday at WakeMed Soccer Park.“Right after we played them down there, we realized we’d hopefully have another chance to play,” SU head coach Ian McIntyre said. “I’m sure they’re as excited to play us as we are to play them.”After Halis was whistled for pushing another player from behind in the 86th minute of SU’s eventual loss, the home crowd of 3,367 immediately started yelling before referee Ted Unkel gave Halis a second yellow card, despite there not being much contact, backup goalkeeper Matt Stith said.SU right wing Oyvind Alseth said that moment demoralized SU, and a team that works constant-ly on defensive set pieces conceded a goal on one just six minutes into overtime.“It wasn’t just the result. It was the morale and the way we played,” Alseth said. “Letting that goal was pretty disappointing. I think the team got over it pretty quickly. The most important thing is how you react to losses, and we haven’t lost since then.”Its loss to Louisville wasn’t a game that highlighted Syracuse’s weaknesses, it was an anomaly in a season where seemingly every break has gone SU’s way. Six of its first 13 games had been 1-0 wins, and when the Orange jumped out to that advantage in the 55th minute, there was no reason to think the game would be any different.“Yes and no,” midfielder Stefanos Stamoulacatos said when asked if he wished the Orange could have that game back. “Everything happens for a reason. We’re playing them now in the final four, I think we’re going to come up on top this time.”McIntyre jokingly said he owed the ACC an apology for robbing the league of a potential Duke-North Carolina semifinal this weekend, noting that it will probably be harder to sell tickets in Cary now.But whether the Orange plays in front of a packed house or empty bleachers, it’s the chance to get back at Louisville that gives SU extra motivation.“We lost two games this season, and now we get to play one of the teams we lost to,” Alseth said. “It’s a big chance for redemption for us and it is quite a big deal.” Commentslast_img read more

Doggie Dive to be held on Monday, Aug. 18 from 6 to 7:30 p.m.

first_img Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. There are no comments posted yet. Be the first one! Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Sumner Newscow report — The Wellington Humane Society will be hosting a Doggie Dive on Monday, August 18 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Wellington Aquatic Center. Admission is $5 per dog at the gate. Please provide proof of vaccination. Also all dogs must be spayed and neutered. ‘Follow us on Twitter.last_img read more

Miner found in Puruni died from chop wounds – autopsy

first_imgA post-mortem examination (PME) conducted on the body of 51-year-old Kelvin Daly revealed he died from the multiple chop wounds he sustained.The PME was conducted on Wednesday morning by State Pathologist, Dr Nehaul Singh, who gave the cause of death as multiple incised wounds.Daly, a miner of Ann’s Grove Village, East Coast Demerara, was found dead along a trail located about a mile from Puruni Landing, Region Seven (Cuyuni-Mazaruni), by one of his colleagues who was on his way to their camp on Monday morning.His body bore wounds to his head, back and throat and it is believed that he was killed sometime between Sunday and Monday.Meanwhile, family members of the father of six are shocked at the incident and areDead: Kelvin Dalycalling for a thorough investigation to be launched by Police.The dead man’s wife, Shonette Andrews, told Guyana Times earlier that the family is still trying to come to grips with the shocking revelations surrounding her husband’s gruesome death.According to Andrews, it was the first time that her husband spent more than eight months away from his family. She said she is not sure of what transpired but was only told of his death after her son received a text message from a friend informing him of his father’s death.“I was sleeping when my son wake me up and told me how someone send a text and tell him how his father got chopped up after that I saw the picture of him laying with chops all over his body. I don’t know what happened, I can’t say,” the grieving woman said.Andrews noted that her eldest son, who was also in the interior with his father, had returned home two days prior to the incident.“When my son came out, I asked him for his father and he told me that he will be coming out in two days’ time since he wanted to make some more money before he comes out. However, after the two days pass, my children started asking for him and we tried calling but we didn’t get him.”So far, no arrests have been made. Nevertheless, the Police are continuing their investigation.last_img read more

Automaker pinning hopes on new Saturn models in turnaround bid

first_imgRoughly 18 months ago GM also began to replenish Saturn. Saturn got the Sky roadster, a sleek two-seat sports car. Later came the Vue small SUV with a hybrid gas-electric version, and the Aura midsize sedan. The Astra, an Opel-based small car to replace the aging Ion, was unveiled Wednesday in Chicago. Lutz said the new models will put pressure on Saturn managers to beat last year’s 6 percent gain in 2007, even though the overall U.S. market may be flat or down. “There is now not a weak sister in the batch,” he said of Saturn’s products. “Everything is top-notch from a design and execution standpoint,” he said. Mark LaNeve, GM’s vice president for sales, service and marketing, said GM’s products should all be substantially new in another 12-18 months. Key is the redesigned Chevrolet Malibu due out later this year to take on Toyota’s Camry. But it will take a while longer for the company to get its message to consumers as it rolls out competitive entries in the small and mid-size car markets, LaNeve said. “We’re not going to have it solved in the next 12 to 18 months,” he said.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! CHICAGO – To peek into the future of the General Motors Corp. turnaround plan, just look at Saturn. Last year, when GM’s sales skidded 8.7 percent, Saturn’s rose by 6 percent. By fall, the small brand that used to call itself “A Different Kind of Car Company” will have a lineup that’s almost completely new, with no models older than 20 months. Simply put, if Saturn falls from orbit with all its new vehicles, GM likely will follow. “It’s a no-excuses product lineup,” GM Vice Chairman for Global Product Development Bob Lutz said in an interview with The Associated Press at the Chicago Auto Show. “I told the sales and marketing guys if this lineup doesn’t work, I’m out of ideas.” Saturn, started in 1990 as GM’s small-car answer to the Japanese automakers, is the canary in the mine for the company’s desperate effort to make itself smaller, leaner and faster to better compete with the enemy, mainly Toyota Motor Corp. Last year, GM’s U.S. sales dropped to slightly more than 4 million vehicles from roughly 4.5 million vehicles in 2005. Toyota, which seemingly can do nothing wrong in the U.S., reported its best year ever in 2006, with sales up 12.9 percent to about 2.5 million vehicles. Just two years ago, Saturn was the metaphor for all of GM’s ills. Its products were old and tired, and what once was a hot brand had been allowed to languish as the company ignored cars and focused on big-profit trucks and sport utility vehicles. At the same time, gas prices rose and GM didn’t have many desirable cars while Toyota did. GM lost market share and buckets of money, $10.6 billion in 2005 alone. There was talk of bankruptcy. All the while, GM was trying to fix itself. It started cutting costs, inducing upward of 34,000 expensive hourly workers to leave through buyouts or early retirement offers. By the end of last year, it had cut $9 billion in annual costs, about $2,000 from every car it sold. It has promised a profit in the fourth quarter, the first one in two years. last_img read more