Randy Abbey suggests Hayatou ‘stole’ Afcon 2017 vote for Gabon

first_imgGhana’s bid team were left licking their wounds after losing out on hosting Afcon 2017 following an announcement in Gabon’s favour on Wednesday.However, Randy Abbey, a member of the Ghana team that traveled to Cairo to witness the landmark announcement alleges underhand dealings.He made the serious allegations while speaking to Joy Sports editor Nathaniel Attoh on Sports Today.”We will like to congratulate Gabon for being declared the winner. But there was something and in the coming hours or days you will hear, I’m sure, from especially the Algerians.”Abbey methodically detailed how the final moments of the voting went on, intoning how bizarre the entire Executive Committe felt the procedure had gone.”Even the Executive Committee members who cast their vote did not know the result of the vote. Only two of them, with Issa Hayatou were called to look at the vote,” Abbey alleged hours after the vote on the primetime afternoon show aired on Multi TV. He went on: “After that they were all ushered into the conference room where the media and the other three countries were.”Issa Hayatou, according to Abbey, then proclaimed Gabon as the winner, but how it happened was fishy.Procedure According to Joy Sports sources, the draw had been slated to be shown live around Africa via pay TV broadcaster, Supersport, but had been cancelled at the last minute, with no reasons given. Randy explains that till date, no one knows how the voting patterns panned out. The procedure is that after the vote, all delegates must know what majority the winner scored. As an example, when Ghana won the 2008 bid the country got a clear 9-3 berth. “What the votes were we don’t know. There were 14 members of Executive Committee who voted,” Abbey explains. “What the rules say is that there must be an outright winner, with a minimum of eight votes.””In this case we didnt know how Gabon won – whether they got five, [or] eight, [or] 10, [or] 13 [or] 14, nobody knows. Even the Executive Committee members weren’t told the results of their votes!””Everybody was brought to the conference room and the Caf president just took a paper that said Gabon had won.”Abbey, a former Communications Director of the Ghana FA said he was sad at the development. “And I found that quite embarrassing, [that this happened] in 2015. Maybe that is the value and culture here. Like they say in strategic management, that is how business is run here.”As at the time of writing this report, CAF have still not made details of the voting immediately available.Strong contendersAlgeria, the other country also in for the bid, are said to be readying an appeal, although it would have to come with the backing of its FA.Sources say Gabon won not only because of their bid’s promise to build on the legacy of 2012, when they last hosted, but due to the well-known relationship between President Ali Bongo Ondimba and Issa Hayatou. Caf is yet to respond to these allegations by Mr. Abbey, but a rep of the football-governing body tells Joy Sports there is no comment on the claims at this time.–Follow Gary on Twitter: @garyalsmithlast_img read more

The Need to Review Dual Citizenship Laws

first_imgSince the publication of our article on the issue of dual citizenship as part of the proposed amendments to the Constitution in the referendum that will be held sometime this year, we have received many reactions. Among the submissions, one stood out, because it brought forth a much simpler solution to the issue: laws governing the loss of Liberian citizenship is not in the Constitution, therefore should not be among the proposed amendments. It was an act passed into law by the William Tolbert administration in 1973. The reader who sent us the information begged to remain anonymous. The act was part of the new citizenship and naturalization law passed in 1973. Here is what it says:Approved: May 15, 1973Amendments Approved: May 9, 1974Chapter 22. LOSS OF CITIZENSHIP§ 22.1. Acts causing loss of citizenship.§ 22.2. Citizenship lost solely from performance of act.§ 22.3. Liberian woman marrying <>§ 22.4. Certificate as to loss of Liberian citizenship.§ 22.1. Acts causing loss of citizenship.From and after the effective date of this title, a person who is a citizen of Liberia whether by birth or naturalization, shall lose his citizenship by —(a) Obtaining naturalization in a foreign state upon his own application, upon the application of a duly authorized agent, or through the naturalization of a parent having legal custody of such person; provided that citizenship shall not be lost by any person under this section as the result of the naturalization of a parent or parents while such person under the age of 21 years, unless such person shall fail to enter Liberia to establish a permanent residence prior to his twenty-third birthday; or(b) Taking an oath or making an affirmation or other formal declaration of allegiance to a foreign state or a political subdivision thereof; or(c) Exercising a free choice to enter or serve in the armed forces of a foreign state, unless, prior to such entry or service, such entry or service is specifically authorized by the President;(d) Voting in a political election in a foreign state or voting in an election or plebiscite to determine the sovereignty of a foreign state over foreign territory; or(e) Making a formal renunciation of Liberian nationality before a diplomatic or consular officer of Liberia in a foreign state in such form may be prescribed by the Secretary of State.[70]§ 22.2. Citizenship lost solely from performance of act.The loss of citizenship under section 22.1 of this title shall result solely from the performance by a citizen of the acts or fulfillment of the conditions specified in such section, and without the institution by the Government of any proceedings to nullify or cancel such citizenship.§ 22.3. Liberian woman marrying <>.A Liberian woman who marries an <> retains her Liberian citizenship unless she renounces it by an affirmative act.[71]§ 22.4. Certificate as to loss of Liberian citizenship.Whenever a diplomatic or consular officer of Liberia has reason to believe that a person while in a foreign state to which such officer is assigned has lost his Liberian nationality under any provision of Section 22.1 of this title, he shall certify the facts upon which such belief is based to the Secretary of State in writing. If the report of such officer is approved by the Secretary of State, a copy of the certificate shall be forwarded to the Attorney General, for his information, and the diplomatic or consular office in which the report was made shall be directed to forward a copy of the certificate to the person to whom it relates.§ 3. This Act shall take effect immediately upon publication in handbills.Therefore, the issue of citizenship should not be among the constitutional amendments to be approved by the electorate. It will simply take the same procedure that brought it into being: an act of the legislature signed by the President or vice-versa.We hope that this will take the debate at another level and that stakeholders will put their energies into a campaign to reverse a law that keeps many capable Liberian hands away from participating in nation building.The waves of migration that occurred in the 1980s and 1990s put on the road of the exile the nascent educated middle-class. Who will take the lead? The President or the Legislature? Or should the Supreme Court simply act on the act? The positive resolution of this issue would allow tens of thousands of Liberians to exercise their franchise and take part in the next elections. Their status in a foreign country must not deprive them of their native rights.However, there is now a reminder that since the Act was passed into law, it becomes part of the Constitution and therefore must be dealt with as any part of the Constitution. Whichever it is, Liberia needs its great human power languishing in the diaspora. And people have no need their foreign passports when they return home.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more