New training providers join NSA

first_imgFour new training providers have joined the National Skills Academy for Food and Drink Manufacturing, taking the number in the network to 32.The College of Agriculture, Food and Rural Enterprise (Cafre) has become the first organisation to be accredited as part of the NSA in Northern Ireland, and will lead the development of a training network dedicated to the needs of the province’s food and drink industry.Bishop Burton College near Beverley, Yorkshire, and Derby College have also joined the NSA’s food and drink processing networks. Newcastle University has become the second member of the leadership and management network. Meanwhile, Sheffield Hallam University has extended its involvement with the NSA network by taking on an additional role to become champion of a network specialising in food innovation.NSA director Justine Fosh said the NSA has now published a directory listing all the training courses available from its members. It can be downloaded from the NSA for Food and Drink Manufacturing website at foodanddrink.nsacademy.co.uk.The NSA steering for bakery – made up of representatives from the baking industry including craft, plant and supermarket businesses as well as trade associations – is currently developing vocational qualifications and ways of delivering skills via a network of training providers, and guided by sector skills council Improve. It is due to announce further details of a pilot foundation bakery training scheme in the coming months.last_img read more

Asheville’s Bent Creek River Park closed for six weeks for natural gas pipeline replacement

first_imgAccording to the Aspen Times, the knuckle huck is a competition that “allows for, encourages and celebrates the flair, the style and the fun at the heart of snowboarding as riders huck themselves off the “knuckle,” or rollover, of the big air landing before landing in the formal landing area. The park says that each of the three primary entrances near Gatlinburg, Cherokee and Townsend all saw an increase in visitors, but the secondary entrances also helped contribute to the large number. “Secondary park entrances experienced tremendous growth, due primarily to the new section of the Foothills Parkway between Walland and Wears Valley,” the park said in a news release. “Over one million visitors enjoyed this new driving experience.” Bent Creek River Park on Brevard Road in Asheville will be closed for up to six weeks while Dominion Energy replaces a natural gas line. Josh O’ Conner, Director of Buncombe County Recreation Services, told WLOS that they worked with Dominion to close the park during the slowest time possible, since Bent Creek River Park is a popular spot for kayakers and tubers to put in during warmer months. Read the full story here: https://wlos.com/news/local/bent-creek-river-park-to-temporarily-close-for-up-to-6-weeks  Read the full story here: https://www.wbir.com/article/entertainment/places/great-smoky-mountains-national-park/great-smoky-mountains-national-park-sets-visitation-record-with-125-million-visitors/51-1c6762a5-cb32-4ee0-aff2-3da87fda17db Great Smoky Mountains National Park breaks visitor record in 2019 Twenty-year-old snowboarder Zeb Powell won gold in Wendy’s Snowboard Knuckle Huck at the X Games in Aspen last week. According to Powell’s Red Bull athlete profile, he grew up skiing at Cataloochee Ski Area where he learned to ride with “creativity, flow and style.” His signature blend, states the website, is “of a super-smooth rail game with shifty spins and tweaked-out grabs.”  Asheville’s Bent Creek River Park closed for six weeks for natural gas pipeline replacement In a statement, Dominion Energy said, “as the regulated natural gas provider in the area, our responsibility is to ensure system reliability and safety in compliance with regulations, and this project is a part of that. We apologize for the inconvenience and will work diligently to complete the project in a timely manner, weather permitting.”  Waynesville, NC native wins Gold at 2020 X Games The country’s most visited national parks keeps getting more popular. In 2019, Great Smoky Mountains National Park saw record visitation numbers, welcoming 12,547,743 visitors. That’s up from a record-breaking year in 2018 which saw 11,421,203 visitors.last_img read more

Computer Law Committee joins Business Law Section

first_img September 1, 2001 Regular News Computer Law Committee joins Business Law Section Computer Law Committee joins Business Law Section The Computer Law Committee has relinquished its position as one of the Bar’s substantive law standing committees, but it hasn’t disappeared. The committee has become part of the Business Law Section and is now accepting members. “The Business Law Section had been courting us for a couple of years to come over and join them,” said Stephen Krulin, chair of the committee. And thanks to the hard work of people like Sam Lewis, the immediate past chair, and Jose Rojas, another former chair, the committee did just that. Prior to becoming an official committee of the Business Law Section, the committee was governed by Bar guidelines which limited the membership to 50 people and imposed a six-year term limit for members. Because the committee was created in the early 1980s, many of its more experienced members were forced to step aside, according to Krulin. The committee also was financially limited, which allowed it to conduct only one CLE offering per year. Krulin said this made it hard for members to present information about current trends in the ever-changing field of computer law. The committee has always been comprised of people who know a great deal about computers and computer law, and who are, for the most part, at the cutting edge of computer-related arbitration, litigation, and mediation, Krulin said. “We approached our CLE efforts as an opportunity to open this experience to the Bar in general. Now, with the section, we’ll be open to providing additional programs,” Krulin said. With the reorganization, the committee will have access to the section’s CLE funds. The committee may also accept as many members as they’d like, including those seasoned members who previously left the committee. “We’re very happy to have them join our section,” said Business Law Section Chair David Felman. “We’re going to invest some money to help them do whatever they want.” Krulin likened the committee’s previous situation to a large plant in a small pot. “The more that we bloomed, the tighter it got. We wanted to expand, and the only way left to us was to become a section, which became impossible,” he said. The Computer Law Committee had sought section status for several years, but a lack of sufficient funding hampered its progress. Many members of the Business Law Section represent technology companies, and some were among the early Computer Law Committee members, which makes for a good pairing, according to Felman. The committee leaders weren’t nearly as confident about the match early on in the process, though. “We’ve got people who teach computer law, who work for businesses, who work for Internet companies, who work in the criminal sector. There’s a wide variety of people who aren’t strictly business lawyers,” Krulin said. “We polled the old-time members, the former chairs, former vice chairs, and posed the question.” The majority of committee members agreed it was a good idea, and when it came down to the final vote, the committee was unanimous. The Computer Law Committee’s first meeting as part of the section commenced at the section’s retreat in Naples in late August. Plans to offer the committee’s experience and knowledge to benefit the legislature’s consideration of upcoming technology and privacy issues were presented.last_img read more