C-NS girls basketball starts 1-2; Liverpool earns opening-week split

first_imgIn their own ways, the girls basketball teams at Cicero-North Syracuse and Liverpool enter the 2019-20 season with intense hunger and quite aware of the challenges ahead.For the Northstars, the main task is simple – dislodge West Genesee and reclaim its place atop the area Class AA ranks. Having most of its roster back, including top forwards Jessica Cook and Julia Rowe, helps in that effort.Knowing how consistent Cook and Rowe are in the paint, all of the C-NS players have said that, if it can find some consistent outside shooting, it could really be tough to beat.All of those elements were on display for C-NS in last Thursday’s opener, a 74-16 romp over Henninger that served as a tune-up for much tougher games on the weekend in the Albany area.Up against Shenendehowa on Saturday afternoon, the Northstars met a severe challenge and could not get past it, falling 80-46 to the Plainsmen.Cook gained 20 points and newcomer Alita Carey-Santagelo added 13 points, but Rowe was kept off the board and Shen was unstoppable in the first half, roaring to a 46-24 advantage.Following that, C-NS challenged Class A powerhouse Averill Park on Sunday afternoon at Shen, AP had already defeated Jamesville-DeWitt the day before, avenging six straight defeats to the Red Rams in Class A regional finals dating back to 2014.Not letting down at all, AP then beat the Northstars 54-42 behind 23 points from Anna Jankovic and 18 points from Kelsey Wood, meaning that C-NS was 1-2 with just its Tuesday game with Nottingham left before a trip to a large holiday national tournament in Arizona late this month.Liverpool’s challenge is a different one. The reconstruction of the high school gymnasium means most of the Warriors’ “home” games will take place at Onondaga Community College’s Allyn Hall.However, for last Tuesday’s season opener against Rochester Mercy (Section V), Liverpool played at Le Moyne College’s Henninger Athletic Center, where it lost, 53-35, to the Monarchs.Held to just 10 points in the first half, Liverpool did improve as the game went on, even though Mercy maintained its comfortable lead. Victoria Morgan led with 12 points, while freshman Naveah Wingate had nine points and Karlyssa Shiflett had six points.From there, the Warriors went to Corcoran on Friday for its SCAC Metro division opener. The Cougars are now coached by one-time great Camille Murphy, who replaced the retiring Jim Marsh.None of this fazed Liverpool, who got its first win of the season by putting away Corcoran 52-30. Holding the Cougars to a single free throw in the first quarter, the Warriors then got its attack going.During the last two periods, Liverpool outscored Corcoran 31-11, with Shiflett earning 13 points as Sarah Miles got 11 points and Jim’Marya Hunter contributed 10 points. Morgan helped out with six points.Share this:FacebookTwitterLinkedInRedditComment on this Story Tags: C-NSgirls basketballliverpoollast_img read more

Silent but deadly: Freshman wing Johnson brings reserved personality to SU bench

first_imgShe seemed puzzled by the question. She said she misses her “sweetheart” dearly while he’s at school. When she first opened the door to the Melo Center, she said, “Where’s my son? Where’s my son?” And she loved going to every one of his games at Lower Merion High School in Pennsylvania. She knew all of that. But a more challenging question stumped her. His mother Sharon Dash watched intently from two feet to his right. Johnson’s aunt, uncle and cousin surrounded her. Dash listened as her son mentioned that he can’t swim, his favorite villain is the Joker and he loves any kind of rice. AdvertisementThis is placeholder text From his standard, squeaky-clean white, size 14 Jordans up to his No. 2 jersey and orange headband, everything was traditional. No Ron Patterson wacky hair. No DaJuan Coleman outlandish tattoos. No Jerami Grant irreversible grin. “At one point in time I thought you had to stick a pin in him to get him to wake up,” Bobby Johnson said. “He was always laid back, and I would always tell him, ‘When you come out on the floor, we don’t need that cool sh*t.’” But she couldn’t pinpoint anything that stood out about him. The banter continued. Dash and her sister Michelle Scott quipped about just how quiet Johnson is. “Noooo,” Dash responded, incredulously looking at her sister, taking a step back and jerking her head downward in disbelief. “I think he talks too much,” Scott said. Published on November 6, 2013 at 3:28 am Contact Trevor: [email protected] | @TrevorHass “He’s just such a plain kid,” Dash said. “Baby, you’ve got to get interesting.” But Johnson’s father Bobby Johnson, who played professional basketball in Portugal and Germany, is the antithesis of quiet. When Bobby grew up in South Philadelphia, the culture was completely different. Jawing and trash talk was incessant. It was the expectation. You had to go out there and play and shut those people up, Bobby Johnson said. If you didn’t, you’d never come back on the floor again.Johnson and his father used to wake up at 6 a.m. and head to Lower Merion to work out for an hour. Johnson was dedicated throughout, Bobby said, but he didn’t always show enthusiasm on the court. B.J. Johnson stood firmly in place with his hands behind his back on the outskirts of the Carmelo K. Anthony Basketball Center gym during media day on Oct. 18. “I was being facetious,” Scott responded wryly. Facebook Twitter Google+ Then Johnson flashed a golden smile, revealing a slight gap between his two front teeth. He swayed back and forth, clearly uncomfortable by the entire situation. Johnson, who’s only 17, is as quiet as they come, according to his relatives. But his reserved nature and tendency to fly under the radar made him lethal in high school and may help him earn a spot in the Syracuse rotation. Comments He didn’t hear his son swear until he was 15 or 16.“I think the first time I actually heard him yell out the four-letter word he was playing at one of the practices and he was like ‘F*ck!’” Bobby Johnson said. “I was like, ‘OK, you do care.’”Before Lower Merion’s state championship game against Chester (Pa.) High School, Johnson and his father drove to the rehabilitation center because Johnson had sprained his ankle and needed treatment. Bobby tried to elicit some sort of enthusiasm out of his son — to make sure he was ready for the biggest game of his high school career.After losing to Chester three years in a row, Johnson and the Aces were out for revenge. But Johnson was calm, unfazed by the pressure of the situation.“I got ’em, dad,” he said coolly.“He got ’em!” Bobby said. Lower Merion beat Chester 63-47, ending the Clippers’ 78-game in-state winning streak. Johnson finished with 22 points and 11 rebounds. But the fire was never fully there. When Bobby Johnson first watched his son play at Lower Merion, he sat there wondering if the other fans would get riled up like he did.“When I first went to the games, the Lower Merion people are sitting there like it’s a cricket match,” Bobby said. “I remember being like, ‘What the — ain’t anybody going to get the guys going?’”Months later, removed from one of the most dominant stints at Lower Merion since Kobe Bryant’s hey-day, Johnson comes to SU as the No. 17 small forward in the class of 2013. Yet on media day, few reporters come his way. He stands far from the center of attention as reporters crowd around stars C.J. Fair and Grant. Most people don’t expect Johnson to play much this season. He may not. But his quiet confidence will help prepare him if he does. He’s not a blue-chipper, 5-star guy, Bobby said, but he works every day.“Sometimes it’s better to be that guy that comes in under the radar and just does what he needs to do,” Bobby said. “Then all of a sudden everybody’s saying, ‘I knew he would be that guy.’”Bobby Johnson recalls asking his son a question back in high school. “It was funny because I asked B.J., ‘Suppose this summer you really blew up and had Roy Williams knocking on your door. Would you want to go to North Carolina?“And he was like, ‘No.’“I said ‘If Coach K was knocking on your door, would you want to go to Duke?’“And he was like, ‘No.’“He had a plan, and it’s what he wanted to do.”Now Johnson’s ready to live out the dream he has had since seventh grade: star at Syracuse. Jim Boeheim said Johnson has surprised the coaching staff up to this point. He’s young, but he can ball. “I’m just really excited to be here and for the season to start,” Johnson said. “That’s pretty much all I’ve been waiting for and now it’s here.” “What’s the most fascinating thing about B.J.?” a reporter asked. last_img read more