A splash with the spleen

first_imgThe Harvard takeoff uses the same music to ask “What Does the Spleen Do?” and speculates, through similar dance numbers and equally absurd lyrics, about the possibilities: secret male uterus, backup tongue, vestigial fin.“The Spleen” was created by a team that involved dozens of members of the second-year class in front of and behind the camera, Rome said. The spleen was selected because it’s a major organ whose functions — filtering the blood, among others — are a mystery to a lot of people.The video was created for 107th annual second-year show, which ran for three nights in December. After the show, Rome said, the creators posted the video online. Though participants mentioned the video to family and friends over Facebook, there was no effort to garner publicity. Despite that, within five days, the video had a million hits.Though dozens of students were involved, the video’s core team was Rome, Will Lewis, Lydia Flier, Eddie Grom, Ariana Metchik-Gaddis, Richard Ngo, Lenka Ilcisin, and Emily Simons, contributing writing, editing, filming, choreography, and costume design.Rome joined “The Spleen” project after helping out on a previous video, called “The Gunner Song,” a takeoff of 2012’s “Thrift Shop,” poking fun at overachieving students at HMS and the Harvard School of Dental Medicine. The videos, Rome said, are a lot of work, but they’re also a lot of fun and allow members of the class to interact in a different way.“It’s such a fun project,” Rome said. “The best part is to work with so many members of the class. It was a blast.” <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aEi_4Cyx4Uw” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/aEi_4Cyx4Uw/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> Who knew the spleen was so funny? And popular?A parody video by a group of Harvard Medical School students went viral in December, garnering a million YouTube hits in just five days and surpassing 1.7 million since.The video’s creators were astounded at its popularity, according to Ben Rome, a second-year student who filmed and edited the video. Rather than just basking in their 15 minutes of fame, however, the students are trying leverage the video’s popularity for a good cause: science education. They launched the HMS/HSDM Organ Challenge, a contest for primary and secondary school students to create a music video highlighting one of the body’s organs.The challenge, launched this month, runs through March 15. Entries will be posted online and judged by members of the second-year class, Rome said. Entrants will be judged according to accuracy and originality, not production values, so students, teachers, and families don’t need to spend a lot of money to win.“Technology today is so easy and accessible, you can make a video on your smartphone,” Rome said.The HMS student video “What Does the Spleen Do?” is a takeoff of last year’s “The Fox (What Does the Fox Say?),” which itself was a music parody by a pair of Norwegian comedians, part of the comedy group Ylvis. The slickly produced original discusses animal sounds and the mystery of fox sounds, setting a catchy beat against simple and absurd lyrics. The video went viral, getting hundreds of millions of hits on YouTube.last_img read more

New baby

first_imgBy Stephanie SchupskaUniversity ofGeorgiaSince her unusual start in a Petri dish, KC has matured into a very normal cow. And on the last day of 2005, she routinely gave birth to Moonshine, her second calf.“KC has done just like every other cow out there and produced a calf within 12 to 13 months of her last calf,” said Steve Stice, the University of Georgia scientist who directed the team of scientists who cloned KC. “Moonshine and Sunshine (KC’s firstborn) were both normal pregnancies and were delivered without assistance, which is important to commercial cow-calf operations that will be using cloning to improve the quality, diseases resistance and productivity of their herds.”KC is different from other cloned cows because she is the first to be cloned from kidney cells taken from a frozen side of beef. The others have been formed from living animals, Stice said.“Right now there are probably a lot of cloned cows out there having calves,” he said, “which is a good thing because it proves cloned cows do have normal offspring.”The public is still wary of cloned cows. Around the time Moonshine’s sister, Sunshine, was born in December 2004, polls indicated that nearly 60 percent of U.S. consumers opposed cloning animals, including livestock.Stice hopes that will eventually change.“The Food and Drug Administration has still not given their approval on cloned animals entering the food chain,” he said. “They have the data they need to give the clearance but other issues may be slowing this down. Once the FDA acts, I think it will mark the beginning of wider acceptance of cloned animals.”Stice is a Georgia Research Alliance eminent scholar and one of the world’s top cloning experts. He conducted the cloning research with the biotechnology firm ProLinia Inc., which was later bought by ViaGen Inc.Since cattle were first domesticated, farmers have been trying to improve their herds through selective breeding. Cloning can speed up the process by allowing scientists to make exact copies of the desired animals and their traits.According to UGA agricultural specialist Joseph Durham, Moonshine came into the world weighing 70 pounds. And although KC did all the work, various animal and dairy science faculty members got to name the new calf. “We did a survey of the animal and dairy science department,” Stice said, “and Moonshine came up on several suggestions.” They decided to move away from the disco theme that started when Sunshine was named after the rhythm and blues group, KC and the Sunshine Band. But Stice recalls that Boogie Shoes, a hit song from the band, was one of the names suggested.(Stephanie Schupska is a news editor with the University ofGeorgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

Sunshine through the walls

first_imgA few days ago I was enjoying a weekend with my husband and my son.We had taken a dip in our pool due to the hot summer day.We had watched a movie together.It was just one of those weekends that you tend to smile about long after they are done.We decided on Sunday evening to take another dip in the pool with friends when we heard a massive crash inside our home.My husband went to investigate and instantly came back outside.What was it? – I asked.Our son’s ceiling caved in – he replied calmly.BE SERIOUS! – I exclaimed.Little did I know at that point, that he was.I remember going into that room and picturing where all of our son’s things were.Where he most often was and how fatal it really could have been had he been in there.All of the sudden all of those “things” were truly just things.All of the sudden we had a vivid reminder of what was really important.Anyone that really knows me, knows that I have anxiety.Although I used to be quite hush hush about it, I have found that talking about it is not only therapeutic but a way to connect with others.Needless to say, this caused a meltdown of epic proportions.I placed a friendship SOS and was greeted with friends and family far and wide sending me votes of confidence and nuggets of faith.Why am I telling you this?Do you know who surrounded us with love and empathy immediately?My credit union family.The people that I have been blessed enough to meet in this movement.Some I have met.Some I just know through the community of financial superheroes.People I had never personally met offering to drive to my home and help the best that they could.Phone calls.Messages.Texts.As I was contemplating what to write about for my article this time, it occurred to me that THIS was exactly what I needed to say.The credit union movement surpasses the financial walls.It doesn’t end at the front door or when the last person leaves the office for the night.Credit union people seem to just carry this magical component with them.Maybe it’s because we learn what caring and empathy means.Maybe it’s because we have seen folks struggle and we have seen them come out the other side better than ever.Maybe it’s just because CU folks are just darn good people.All I know is that I am experiencing a low right now.I am worried, anxious, and every other adult word that makes your spine tingle.Despite all of those feelings, my credit union family continues to lift my spirits and restore my faith that everything will be okay.This is my shout out.My shout out to all of my CU people far and wide.You’re amazing people.You do amazing things.You make amazing connectionsYou make amazing differences in people’s lives.That hole in my son’s room is just potential for greater change.I know that because the credit union movement and the people within it taught me. 11SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Nanci Wilson Nanci started her credit union journey due to lack of kindness.That fact is what led her to close her bank account and open up at a credit union.Ultimately … Web: https://www.universityfederalcu.org Detailslast_img read more

Issues with MLB coronavirus testing process disrupt Angels workouts

first_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error The Angels ended up turning a morning workout into an optional afternoon workout, with only about a dozen players actually working out on the field at Angel Stadium.Manager Joe Maddon said it was prudent to simply allow most of the players to stay home because of the uncertainty, but he did not sound concerned that there was a larger issue with the testing.“I believe this will be a short lived situation,” Maddon said Monday. “I think it has a lot to do with the Fourth of July. That’s my opinion. I want to believe that everything will get straightened out relatively soon. I have not lost any confidence.”As MLB attempts to forge ahead with a season amid the coronavirus pandemic, all players are supposed to be tested at least every 48 hours. The tests are administered by an outside company, which runs them through a lab in Salt Lake City.On Sunday, the testers did not arrive at either Angel Stadium or Long Beach State’s Blair Field, the alternate site the Angels are using for many of their players. The Angels instead collected the saliva samples with their own staff. Their workout on Monday had been scheduled to start at 9 a.m., but on Sunday night it was pushed back to noon and then on Monday morning it was pushed back to 1 p.m and changed to optional. As of Monday morning, they were expecting testers to be present on Monday. They will continue to work out later in the day to allow more time for the test results to be logged.Teams began reporting for summer camp last Wednesday, a process that involved extensive testing of all players and staffers who work closely with players. In order to participate, a person must receive a negative test for coronavirus.Many players throughout the majors have been absent from camps so far, and only a fraction of those have actually been reported to have positive tests. Many others are presumably still awaiting results, or awaiting results of tests from family members.So far different teams appear to be having different issues with the logistics of the testing.The A’s had a batch of their samples still awaiting transportation to Salt Lake City, apparently delayed because of the holiday. The Nationals, Astros and Cardinals canceled their workout on Monday because they hadn’t received the results of tests taken on Friday. The Diamondbacks delayed the start of their workout on Monday.The New York Yankees also apparently took the saliva samples themselves on Sunday when no tester showed up, but they did not alter their workout schedule.“The process has not been without some unforeseen difficulties, which are being addressed with the service providers that are essential to the execution of the protocols,” the MLB statement said. “It is important to be mindful that nearly all of the individuals have been tested as planned.  The health and safety of our players and employees will remain our highest priorities.”Maddon said he had not heard any complaints from Angels players, despite the issue on Sunday.“I didn’t have one guy come up to me yesterday complaining about anything,” Maddon said. “So I didn’t look for it. Today so far, nobody has contacted me.”GAME TIME … SORT OFThe Angels are scheduled for their first intrasquad game on Tuesday. Andrew Heaney and Shohei Ohtani will be the two starting pitchers, with Heaney throwing about four innings and Ohtani working two or three, Manager Joe Maddon said.Maddon said the game will also include most of the everyday players, although there won’t necessarily be two lineups or traditional innings. For example, Maddon said they may have coaches playing the outfield. Hitters will get as many at-bats as they need.“You want to make sure the varsity feels good about themselves by the time they leave,” Maddo said. “They will get plenty of opportunity on the field. Right now that we’re unable to bring other teams in and play normal competitive baseball, this is the best way to get things done.”The Angels are scheduled to have some sort of intrasquad game just about every day for the next couple weeks.ALSOMaddon said he had no updates on any of the players who have not yet begun workouts, the most prominent of which is Julio Teheran. Teams are prohibited from giving information about coronavirus-related absences without the player’s consent. Players also could be missing simply because they haven’t yet received results.center_img A day after officials contracted by Major League Baseball failed to show up to administer the Angels’ coronavirus tests, the team twice delayed its workouts to accommodate the tests.At least five other teams — the Arizona Diamondbacks, Oakland A’s, Houston Astros, St. Louis Cardinals and Washington Nationals  — have had workouts delayed or canceled because of logistical issues with testing in the past 24 hours.MLB released a statement on Monday afternoon acknowledging issues with the testing.“We have addressed the delays caused by the holiday weekend and do not expect a recurrence,” the statement said. “We commend the affected Clubs that responded properly by cancelling workouts.”last_img read more