RnaG to remember life of famed Donegal writer this weekend

first_imgThe 50th anniversary of the death of famed Donegal writer Séamus Ó Grianna, or Máire, takes place this weekend.And on Friday 25 October at 2 pm Damien Ó Dónaill will present a documentary about the writer on RTÉ Raidió na Gaeltachta.Ó Grianna from Tóin a’Bhaile in Rann na Feirste, was a prolific writer, and his work is renowned for its beautiful, rich Irish. His novel Caisleáin Óir, and short story collection Cith is Dealán, are amongst his best-known works. In the programme Séamus Ó Grianna 1889 – 1969 on RTÉ Raidió na Gaeltachta on Friday, Damien Ó Dónaill will interview some of those who knew him about his life, and he will speak to scholars who have studied his work.We’ll also hear archive material from Séamus, his son Feilimí, and his brother Seán Bán. Guests will include Prof Nollaig Mac Congáil, Dinnie Dhónáill Ó Domhnaill and Dr Tony Mac Ruairí.This weekend, starting on Friday evening, there will be a celebration of Séamus Ó Grianna’s life at Áislann Rann na Feirste, with events including lectures, a walk, dramas, and a night of music on Saturday night.Séamus Ó Grianna 1889 – 1969 will be broadcast on RTÉ Raidió na Gaeltachta on Friday 25 October at 2 pm, and is presented and produced by Damien Ó Dónaill. RnaG to remember life of famed Donegal writer this weekend was last modified: October 22nd, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Adopt-a-River: women show the way

first_img17 September 2010When Nomvula Malinga was growing up, she used to swim in the Isipingo River – something that years of pollution and degradation have since made impossible. In February 2009, Malinga, together with other women from Durban’s Umlazi area, began cleaning up the river themselves.Malinga says the river had become a disgusting sight with people using it as a “rubbish dump filled with sewage, dead animals and overgrown weeds”.Zodwa Elizabeth Ndlovu agrees, saying the river was “absolutely filthy; even the water was receding … There was a foul smell coming from the river, and most children in the area started developing asthma”.“As women of the area, we decided to get together to see what we could do,” says Malinga. “And in 2008, about 100 of us started discussing how we could contribute to ensuring that the river was in the state that it was in those many years ago.”In February 2009, the women started to clean the river without being paid.The Adopt-a-River ProjectLast month, Deputy Water and Environmental Affairs Minister Rejoice Mabudafhasi officially launched the Isipingo Adopt-a-River Project, with an allocation of R1.7-million.Adopt-a-River aims to create awareness among communities about the importance of protecting water resources. Local women are paid a monthly stipend, and receive training in water resource management.A similar project is running in Thohoyandou, Limpopo, where a group of 100 women are cleaning up the Luvuvhu River.In the case of the Isipingo River, the project “was initiated by the women themselves,” says Mabudafhasi’s spokesman, Peter Mbelengwa. “They did not wait for the department to approach them. Therefore we know that it is a sustainable project.“The women didn’t just take the initiative to clean rivers, but also grow vegetable gardens and help themselves,” says Mbelengwa. “They are making such a huge difference to their lives and communities.”The 100 women from the Umlazi area, including Malinga and Ndlovu, will continue cleaning the river for a period of 12 months.“We were volunteering our services and doing it for the betterment of our community,” says Ndlovu. “It was tough when we started, because we did not have the necessary equipment.”Spirit of ubuntuThe spirit of unbuntu is thriving among the women, who help each other out in different ways.“I remember a day when a man walked past us and saw what we were doing. He asked us if we had food and of course we didn’t, but he pulled out a R20 and told us to get food,” says Ndlovu. “Many of the women who work on this project cannot afford certain things, so we try to help each other out in terms of bringing lunch when we are working.”Pangas and sickles are used to cut away weeds and alien vegetation. “We also pick up the rubbish in the river,” says Malinga. “We wear overalls, boots, and gloves to ensure that we do not get sick, and use black refuse bags to collect the refuse. We work from 8am to 12pm daily.”The women also plant crops in the cleared areas.“We also have our own vegetable gardens in the areas where we have cleared weeds and refuse,” says Ndlovu. “We also want to have a nursery and a park that we will name. We want to give back to our community.‘Be considerate in your actions’Malinga urges South Africans to be considerate about their actions.“In everything that you do, ensure that it won’t adversely affect your community. Our families get ill because of the things that we throw away in our rivers, streets, etc. Our municipalities provide us with black bags to throw away our refuse. Use those,” she says.Women need not wait for government grants, said Ndlovu. The mother of two feels that South African women need to stand up and think for themselves.“Go out in your community and look at how you can help. Because of this project, we were able to have our own vegetable gardens, and we have also been able to use water from the river.”The women have now received training, and intend to use the information to educate their communities.“We know that we can make an impact in our communities by doing this,” says Malinga. “I have also taught my three kids about the work that I do, and my daughter and I often go around in our community teaching other women and their daughters about keeping their environment clean.“When I started this, I did not have previous knowledge about rivers, so the work that the other women and I have been doing has helped us learn new things.”Eventually, the women aim to start their own market to sell the produce from their vegetable gardens.Ndlovu is setting a great example for her 15- and 21-year-old daughters, who also have vegetable gardens. “I want them to carry on my legacy and help their communities where they can and make a meaningful contribution.”Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Polling gets underway in Jammu and Kashmir panchayat election

first_imgModerate polling was witnessed in the early hours of the first phase of panchayat election in Kashmir Valley on Saturday as nearly nine per cent of voters exercised their franchise till 10 am.“A total of 8.9 per cent of the electorate cast their votes at 283 polling locations across the valley till 10 am,” an official said.They said 12,104 votes were polled in the first two hours of the poll conducted in 16 blocks in six districts of the valley.The officials said the total number of electorate in these polling stations is 1,35,774.In 10 blocks of Ladakh region having 130 polling locations, the officials said 1,001 votes were polled in the first two hours.The total electorate in these polling stations is 25,906 and the voting percentage till 10 am is 3.9 per cent.The total voting percentage in Kashmir division, including Ladakh region, at 10 am is 8.1 per cent, the officials said.Voting began at 8 am at 3,296 polling stations — 1,303 in Kashmir and 1,993 in Jammu — and would end at 2 pm, officials said.The officials said that in the first phase polling, 85 sarpanch and 1,676 panch have been elected unopposed while voting is taking place on the remaining 420 sarpanch and 1,845 panch seats, for which 5,585 candidates are in the fray.They said there are 4,45,059 electors for sarpanch seats and 2,72,792 for panch constituencies.All necessary arrangements are in place for the smooth conduct of the polls, the officials said, adding massive security arrangements, including deployment of Central Armed Police Forces (CAPF), have been made to ensure peaceful election.The government has declared holiday on the day of poll in the panchayat areas where polls are taking place so as to enable the voters to cast their vote.While the polls are being conducted on the non-party basis, the NC, PDP and the CPI(M) have announced to stay away from the electoral exercise due to the legal challenge to Article 35-A of the Constitution in the Supreme Court.The NC and the PDP have asked the Centre to make its stand clear in the apex court on the constitutional provision and urged it to defend its continuation in the court.They had also boycotted the municipal polls which were conducted last month.Separatists in Kashmir Valley have called for boycott of the polls and asked people to observe a shutdown on Saturday.last_img read more

Measuring Effectiveness of Base Closure Could Support DODs Case for New Rounds

first_imgThe Pentagon’s case for conducting a new round of base closures could be stronger if it had measured whether the goals of the 2005 round of base closures — reducing excess infrastructure, transforming the military and promoting jointness — were achieved, according to a recent report by the Government Accountability Office (GAO). Instead officials from DOD and the services tracked their progress completing the BRAC Commission’s recommendations by the September 2011 statutory deadline and measured the cost savings associated with them. The congressional watchdog agency found that the department did not have the necessary data to calculate how much excess infrastructure was disposed of during the 2005 round.With no way to evaluate whether the last BRAC round achieved its goals, DOD cannot demonstrate whether the services’ realignment and closure actions improved their efficiency and effectiveness, preventing it from showing Congress that the benefits of a future BRAC round would outweigh the upfront implementation costs, the agency said.In March 2013, GAO recommended that “in the event of any future BRAC round, DOD identify appropriate measures of effectiveness and develop a plan to demonstrate the extent to which the department achieved the results intended from the implementation of the BRAC round.” But DOD opposed the recommendation, stating that military value should be the primary driver for BRAC. In the new report, GAO calls for Congress to “consider, in any future BRAC authorization, a requirement for DOD to identify appropriate measures of effectiveness and to track the achievement of its goals.”DOD opposed that recommendation as well, stating it would “subvert the statutory requirement that military value be the priority consideration,” according to the report. Its recommendation does not, however, undermine the department’s reliance on military value as the primary selection criteria for its candidate BRAC recommendations, GAO notes.“If Congress would like to increase its oversight for any future BRAC round, requiring DOD to identify appropriate measures of effectiveness and track achievement of its goals would provide it with improved visibility over the expected outcome,” the agency states. Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more