Fire crews attend blaze on 100th street – update

first_img* Update: Fire crews have successfully put-out the small blaze at the Pryndik Bit & Supply Store on Friday. Fire Chief Fred Burrows says the fire was likely caused by a spark from the chimney. He says it got caught on the roof, and began burning through fiberglass panel and eventually through some styrofoam on the roof. This caused smoke to fill the building. Chief Burrows says an elderly man was inside when crews arrived, and was trying to put out the fire.   He was treated in an ambulance on-site and released shortly after. Chief Burrows estimates the damage to be around $1,000. =================The Fort St. John Fire Department attended a fire at 8808 100th Street on Friday.Ambulance crews were also on-site.The fire is causing minor delays to vehicles travelling in both directions on 100th street.Advertisement – Advertisement -By Christine Rumleskie More information will be posted as it becomes available.center_img Photo: Fire crews inspect this building on 100th Street on Friday – Christine Rumleskie/Energeticcity.calast_img read more

Youve heard about Kusamas Infinity Mirrors opening at the AGO Now heres

first_imgAdvertisement Login/Register With: Toronto is the fourth stop on a six-city tour. Kusama’s exhibition opens at the AGO March 3 and will run until May 27. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement If you’re wondering why the outside of the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) is covered in dots, take a peek inside because the much anticipated Infinity Mirrors exhibit has landed in Toronto.Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama, 88, has had an obsession with dots. She’s still using them in her studio, now painting them primarily on canvases and sculptures.“For her the pocket dot is a symbol of life, of nature of connectivity,” said Adelina Vlas, the AGO’s associate curator of contemporary art. “Back in the 60s she used to cover herself and the idea was that with dots you obliterate yourself… you shed any sign of individuality and you become one.”Some of Kusama’s earlier work included phallic shapes covered in her famous polka dots. ( Martin Trainor/CBC News)center_img Advertisement Room, Dots Obsession – Love Transformed into Dots, features large dotted balloons surrounded by mirrors. It was made in 2007. (Martin Trainor/CBC News) Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Business Magazines Need to Find their Purpose for Being in Business

first_imgAs 2009 mercifully marches toward its long-awaited end, the magazine field is littered with battered, bruised, bleeding and sometimes even deceased bodies of America’s business magazines. In a turnaround of almost Biblical proportions, the business category, which enjoyed seven or so of the fattest years in magazine history in the 1990s now is suffering through seven or more of the leanest.Some of this pain and suffering is purely cyclical, of course, on several dimensions. What goes up must come down, and business magazines in the 1990s were so far up that it was almost inevitable that they’d fall to earth with a thud in the 2000s. You can chalk some of it up to category fatigue and even more to the bad behavior, malfeasance and criminal undertakings of many of the poster children whose faces graced America’s business magazines as heroes, shortly before they graced the cells of America’s prisons as inmates.And then, of course, in a recession with the depth and breadth of our current economic meltdown, business magazines—which traditionally depend on business-to-business advertising more than business-to-consumer magazines—find themselves hit harder than other categories. Business which themselves aren’t buying anything are hardly likely to spend money advertising to other businesses which also aren’t buying anything. It’s a perfect non-revenue producing feedback loop. Rules of Engagement Have ShiftedBut there’s also a structural problem that business magazines have been slow to respond to: business and the world of work have been changing at a rapid and dramatic pace. The rules of engagement seem to have shifted; how to play the game, how to win, what winning even means—all are undergoing massive and uncharted changes.Now, you’d think that this new and dramatic narrative would provide business magazines with exactly the kind of once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to explain the new world of business to baffled, scared, and fear-frozen readers. The problem is, of course, that the magazines are themselves so baffled, scared and fear-frozen, they are as more a part of the scene than they are seasoned observers helping make sense of it. Add to that the burden of reinventing old and tired brands that no longer seem relevant to a world of transforming technology, global competition, economic recalibration and career recalculation, and it’s not hard to see why most business magazines are concentrating on surviving rather than self-reinvention.Staying in Business vs. Having a Purpose for Being in BusinessStill, as 2009 drags to a weary and welcome close, there’s reason for hope that 2010 will promise new life. There’s the acquisition by Bloomberg of BusinessWeek for a song—a huge upside opportunity if it means leveraging Bloombergs multi-platform approach to business journalism and financial analysis to BusinessWeek’s historic capacity for smart essays and clever idea packaging. But that’s only one title. Every business magazine has the same opportunity—a chance to grab on to the fascinating and dramatic “story line” that is shaping up in the new, emerging world of business. If the surviving business magazines each finds its own distinctive voice to educate readers to the huge changes under way in the economy and in the world of work, and they commit to a publishing world where the job of the magazine is to start a useful, colorful, dynamic conversation with a community of readers who need help making new and valuable connections, then 2010 can be a great year of re-invention and re-commitment to the real purpose of business magazines. (On the other hand, if they keep doing what they’ve been doing, they may survive, but it won’t really matter; they’ll gradually become less and less relevant.)This isn’t just idle speculation on my part; for the last year I’ve been traveling and speaking extensively on the changing face and shape of business, and everywhere I go, both in the United States and abroad, I find eager, hungry, actively involved audiences—people who care deeply about what happens next in the world of business. These are business executives, but also political and non-profit leaders. They are dissatisfied with the current explanation of the role of the corporation in society and they are disgusted with a public conversation that seems stuck on matters of superficiality and celebrity. They want authenticity, integrity, and real dialog—and instead they feel they’ve been getting a steady diet of status-quo thinking, round-up-the-usual-suspects journalism, and convenient excuses for why things can’t change.The exciting truth is we are at the threshold of a new era in business. All over the world we’re witnessing massive discontinuities in how work gets done, who does it, how value is created, where it gets created—one epoch is ending, another is just being born. What business magazines need to do is to embrace the changes and challenges that are rocking the world of business—get in front of the evolving story line; engage readers in a conversation; challenge the status quo instead of offering bland reassurances that the status quo will prevail; generate useful, provocative debate; discover new voices who champion new ideas and unconventional practices.It’s not just a matter of finding a way to stay in business; it’s a matter of having a purpose for being in business in the first place. Entrepreneurship is the answer to the companies business magazines cover; it’s also the answer to the future of the magazines themselves. It’s not even a question of returning to profitability. It’s a question of returning to relevancy.last_img read more

Social Media Giants Tighten Operations Ahead of Indias MegaElection

first_img Popular on Variety ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15 The specter of fake news is all too real in India and, in a bid to curb this, on Tuesday, WhatsApp launched ‘Checkpoint Tipline’ where users can report suspicious material. The company will confirm whether the shared information is verified or not.Earlier, on March 20, the Social Media Platforms and Internet And Mobile Association of India, which includes representatives of Facebook, WhatsApp, Twitter, Google, ShareChat, TikTok and others, presented a voluntary code of ethics to Indian election commissioners. The code consists of several steps to prevent abuse, and to maintain a transparent flow of information to the Election Commission.The Election Commission has an exhaustive model conduct code that all political parties are expected to adhere to, beginning with “No party or candidate shall indulge in any activity which may aggravate existing differences or create mutual hatred or causing tension between castes and communities, religious or linguistic.”center_img As India, the world’s largest democracy, gears up for a gigantic general electoral process, global social media companies are putting their own houses in order. The election runs in seven phases from April 11 through May 19, with results known on May 23.Approximately 900 million Indians, many of whom are constantly exposed to social media via their phones, are eligible to vote in the elections. Facebook counts approximately 300 million subscribers in India, making the country its largest single market.On Monday, Facebook removed hundreds of pages associated with the opposition Indian National Congress party and the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party for “coordinated inauthentic behavior.” With ongoing tensions between India and neighboring Pakistan, the company removed 103 Facebook and Instagram pages with links to the Pakistan military.last_img read more