River Gee County Risks Malaria Outbreak

first_imgThe Deputy Director for Community Health Services Division at the Ministry of the Health and Social Welfare, Daniel S.M. Wessih, Jr., has disclosed that about 90 percent of those who received free insecticide mosquito nets in the six statutory districts of River Gee County are not using the nets.He stated that their action might expose the county to malaria outbreak.Mr. Wessih said ‘mosquito nets’ used to prevent mosquitoes, especially the female mosquitoes, from biting the body        and causing malaria, have been misused in the county either for fishing purposes, bathing scrub sapoe/siphon, amongst others.Deputy Director Wessih made the startling revelation over the weekend during the formal Logan Town’s Malaria awareness campaign held at the Logan Town General Market, under the theme ‘Get Tested before Treatment.’The health and social worker said the threat of a malaria outbreak means there will be death, because malaria kills.He stated that the information of the malaria statistics is based on reports gathered from the over 90 General Community Health Volunteers, who were assigned in the county during a 10-day ICCM workshop, which ran from the 18th to the 28th of February.The Integrated Community Case Management (ICCM) workshop that was sponsored by UNICEF, brought together over 90 GCHVs in different locations within the county. Diseases highlighted were diarrhea, ARI (Pneumonia) and malaria.Deputy Director Wessih stated that according to the GCHVs’ report, the citizens had regretted the misapplication of the mosquito nets, but are appealing for another donation and have agreed of pay L$2,000 for anyone of them who will be caught misapplying or have misapplied the mosquito nets.He said in order to tackle the scary reports coming from River Gee, they have instructed the GCHVs to be robust about the BCC: meaning, Behavior Change Community.“There are 250 persons to a GCHV so we have encouraged our volunteers to double their rounds to test especially children and child-bearing girls for malaria, and administer the treatment,” Deputy Director Wessih opined.Meanwhile, over 600 persons, mainly women and children were reached during formal Logan Town’s Malaria awareness campaign held at the Logan Town General Market, over the weekend, under the theme ‘Get Tested before Treatment.’The ‘Get Tested before Treatment on Malaria’ official awareness campaign began in Clara Town in December 2013, and was also held in West Point in January this year.The outreach was merely aimed to clarify that not every fever (illness) is malaria therefore people must and should get tested before taking malaria treatment; and if tested positive, they should only take the new globally confirmed malaria tablets called Artemisinin based Combination Therapy (ACT).Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Only a fraction of Guyanese get into crime (part 1)

first_imgDear Editor,I would like to dwell on a letter which captions “Give ghetto youths a ladder to climb out of that despair “by Dr Mark Devonish so as to put the murderous crime situation that has engulfed this country into perspective. The world needs to be informed that in this country, hardhearted bandits chronically kick down the doors of helpless citizens to gain access to their homes to brutalise, rob and murder them. Of course, such a problem tarnishes our national image, divides Guyanese and destroys our economy. So, there is nothing good about crime. Also, I would like to remind Dr Devonish that the majority of Guyanese never fall into crime, even though Guyana is poverty-stricken and most communities can be described as ghetto-like.If anything, poverty should at least instinctively drive Guyanese into survival mode to unite as one, to work hard, to make sacrifices, to penny- pinch, to show empathy and to respect others but never to engage in inhumanity.And most Guyanese have been doing exactly this.  I remember how my family made our meals without oil and various necessary ingredients to cut cost and to save money for our house rent which was our priority.Also, I remember walking miles and miles to and from my school even in bad weather so that I could hold onto money to buy school supplies etc. And in spite of having very little, we tried our best to save for a rainy day.In short, we handle poverty though thrifty means, personal sacrifice and hard work. Such values enable us to survive on our own sweat and I am extremely proud of this.  So Dr Devonish, even if we did not raid trash cans like you did, it does not mean that our lives are great.We also never entertained the idea of doing anything criminal because we are cultured to see crime as inhumane and shameful. These are part of our value system that steers us away from crime. And in the face of our difficulties, I am understandably angry that we also become victims of brutal criminals who are nothing but lawless bullies.This then sparks all sorts of logical questions, including why is it that only some Guyanese fall into crime and the majority of us don’t, even though we are all sailing in rough waters?And the answer primarily lies in the differences in our values, not poverty. Examples of this analysis are practically seen everywhere in this country.  Editor, just look around you and you will see that most Guyanese lives in poverty but only a fraction get into crime and destroy this country.  Any behaviourists would agree that human behaviours are driven by good and bad moral values. Good moral values entail: respecting others, working hard for success and living off of one’s own sweat. Bad moral values are the opposite.Sincerely,Annie Baliramlast_img read more