Businessman slapped with causing death charge

first_img– placed on M bailA businessman on Wednesday appeared at the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts before Magistrate JudyMohammed RahmandLatchman, charged with causing death by dangerous driving.Mohammed Rahmand, from the West Bank of Demerara (WBD), pleaded not guilty to the charge when it was read to him.It is alleged that on July 28, at Houston Public Road, Georgetown, the 31-year-old man drove a motor vehicle bearing registration plates PSS 4430 in a manner dangerous to the public, thereby causing the death of Lisa Khan.The prosecution’s case contended that on the day in question, the defendant was attempting to overtake another vehicle when he struck Khan in the process.Following the accident, a breathalyser test was conducted and it was found that the defendant was over the legal alcohol limit.As such, he was arrested and charged with the offence. In court on Wednesday, the family of the deceased told the court that they do not wish to pursue the matter, as the defendant has been assisting them with burial expenses.However, this did not have any impact on the court’s decision to have the matter go to trial. After a successful bail application, the businessman was placed on $1 million bail.The case will continue on August 17.last_img read more

Enforcement of laws in Guyana lacking – US State Department

first_imgForeign Direct Investment …points to complaints about judicial delaysA recent report from the United States Economic Affairs Bureau has painted an unflattering picture of Guyana’s legal system and the way it doles out justice in contractual and civil matters. Among other things, the report cites complaints of sloth in the Judiciary As a factor in its analysis.Guyana was among other countries that had their investment climates assessed by the US Department of State for 2018. The report makes it clear that the problem is not legislation; it’s the enforcement of said legislation.“Sufficient legislation exists in Guyana to support foreign investment in the country, but implementation of relevant legislation continues to be inadequate. The objectives of the Investment Act of 2004 are to stimulate socio-economic development by attracting and facilitating foreign investment,” it states.The Department noted that other relevant laws include the Income Tax Act, the Customs Act, the Procurement Act of 2003, the Companies Act of 1991, the Securities Act of 1998, and the Small Business Act.It was pointed out however, that the regulators are still required to act in order for much of these legislative measures to be implemented. And even though the State Department acknowledged that there is no known case of executive interference, it noted that the court systems are still perceived as lacking.“The judicial system is generally perceived to be slow and ineffective in enforcing legal contracts. The 2018 World Bank’s Doing Business Report states that it takes 581 days to enforce a contract in Guyana. Suspected corrupt practices and long delays make the courts an unattractive option for settling investment or contractual disputes, particularly for foreign investors unfamiliar with Guyana.”“In order to redress this obstacle to investment, the Government of Guyana, with support from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), established a Commercial Court in June 2006. Given Guyana’s growth potential, there is need for expansion and strengthened capacity in the near future.”In summing up, the State Department noted that implementing the legal framework remains inadequate as the judicial system is slow and ineffective in enforcing legal contracts.The Department also noted that there have been no recent cases of expropriation. It went on to advise that all companies should conduct due diligence and seek appropriate legal counsel to have any concerns resolved prior to doing business in Guyana.Persons have long complained about the sloth of the Judiciary. A recent case was Opposition Leader Bharrat Jagdeo, who had noted back in June that more than three years after his party filed an election petition in the High Court, the matter continued to languish in the courts.last_img read more