Panel explores Saint Teresa of Avila’s relevance to young Catholics

first_imgFour speakers gathered Thursday night at Saint Mary’s to discuss St. Teresa of Ávila’s relevance to young Catholics as part of a spring lecture series in honor of the 500th anniversary of her birth.Teresa’s selflessness and love for others were common themes in each speaker’s presentation, but Julia Feder, a postdoctoral fellow in Notre Dame’s theology department, focused especially on false humility, which she said can produce fear and a lack of confidence in believers.“There are many opportunities to misinterpret humility,” Feder said. “False humility can produce fear and overzealous penitential practices. True humility will lead one to accept God’s blessings and courageously take up love of one’s neighbor. It will lead to activity, rather than to paralysis.”Additionally, Feder emphasized the importance of honoring God through prayer. She said conversation with God can lead to greater understanding of oneself.“Prayer is for those seeking purification,” Feder said. “It is the door to the healing works of God. The journey toward union with God and prayer is also a journey toward knowledge of the self.”Maria Surat, a master of divinity student at Notre Dame, discussed Teresa’s desire for people to follow in the example of the Carmelites and meditate each day.“Teresa taught that prayer is nothing but a conversation between friends,” Surat said. “She tells us to seek God with determination and to never give up in prayer. Prayer is not thinking much but loving much.”Surat said Teresa’s followers should consider God a close friend, for this perspective can help them to grow in faith.“Teresa teaches us to seek God’s face in the person of Christ and to cultivate intimate friendship with him,” Surat said. “We are called to friendship with God so that we might encourage others to seek him.”Surat related her own life to Teresa’s life 500 years ago and said Teresa faced challenges much like her own.“In contemporary society, we are faced with many challenges to the gospel,” Surat said. “Teresa encourages us to be strong friends of God. She too was living in a time of painful division of the Church.”Katie Bugyis, a Ph.D. candidate in Medieval Studies at Notre Dame, said Teresa’s experiences connect with those of her modern-day followers.“Teresa had to overcome opposition,” she said. ““he was even forced to abandon her efforts to retire to a monastery in Castille for four years. She quickly learned from the many difficulties that plagued her foundations and developed strategies for circumventing any obstacles.”Despite Teresa’s struggles, Bugyis said she witnessed the establishment of 17 Carmelite houses for nuns throughout Spain, where she enforced her own guidelines and principles.“Teresa’s reforming ideals were inspired by nearly 30 years of experience as a Carmelite nun at La Encarnación in Ávila,” Bugyis said. “Teresa was convinced that preferential treatment would destroy monastic communities. She insisted ‘All must be friends, all must be loved, all must be held dear, all must be helped.’”Saint Mary’s sophomore Kaleigh Ellis shared photos of her time in Ávila, where she walked in Teresa’s footsteps.“Ávila has a real devotion to Teresa,” Ellis said. “It puts history in perspective when you can walk around areas where people like St. Teresa walked around.”Although her 500th birthday will be celebrated March 28, Teresa’s legacy is ongoing, Surat said.“Teresa is a woman who has truly experienced God in her life, and she speaks to us from that experience,” Surat said. “We are encouraged to make Teresa’s dying words our own: ‘I want to see God. I am a daughter of the church.’” Tags: Saint Mary’s College, Saint Teresa of Avilalast_img read more

POGOs given three days to settle tax liabilities

first_img Domiguez said then that POGOs operating in the country have unpaid taxes that already amounted to P21.62 billion. The Chief Executive initially ordered POGOs to settle their liabilities in 24 hours but changed it to three days during his television interview on Friday night. “They are now ordered to register with the BIR (Bureau of Internal Revenue) and kumuha ng tag number,” Duterte said in an interview with the CNN Philippines. Philippine Offshore Gaming Operators was conceptualized to enable the government to capture a greater share of the growing, yet previously unregulated, online gaming pie. ABS-CBN NEWS “You better settle that utang or else gawin ko kayong pugo,” he added. “Huwag ninyong lokohin ang Pilipino kasi ang Pilipino hindi loko-loko.”center_img Upon the order of Finance secretary Carlos Dominguez to shut down POGOs with tax liabilities, the BIR started its crackdown on POGOs last September. MANILA – President Rodrigo Duterte has given the Philippine Offshore Gaming Operators (POGOs) a three-day ultimatum to settle their tax liabilities. Latest BIR data showed that a total of P1.63 billion in witholding taxes was collected from POGOs and service providers from January to August this year. The bureau collected around P579 million in 2018 and P175 million in 2017./PNlast_img read more

Ireland beat Zimbabwe in thriller

first_img The Sussex batsman was twice dropped, while he edged his first ball just short of slip, but was otherwise imperious as he hit nine fours and three sixes. He joined in a third-wicket partnership of 138 with Andy Balbirnie, who was only three runs away from following Joyce to three figures after he was run out during the late-over scramble. Ireland took 108 from the final 10 overs to reach their highest ODI score, surpassing the 329 for seven they racked up during their famous World Cup win over England in Bangalore four years ago. When Zimbabwe then crashed to 74 for four in reply Ireland were in total control only for Taylor and Williams to turn the momentum of the match in a 149-run stand. Taylor reached his century from 79 balls and Ireland’s attack was looking toothless until Cusack produced a slower ball to fool the Zimbabwe skipper into spooning a catch to mid-on. Williams kept the scoreboard ticking over and had reduced the task to a manageable 32 from 20 balls when Mooney’s controversial catch was claimed. It was a critical moment and while Mupariwa made Ireland sweat, as he hit Kevin O’Brien for back-to-back fours and then a six, Cusack cleaned up the tail in a thrilling finale. The third umpire was called to judge the catch, although Williams did not remain on the field of play after he instead opted to take the word of Mooney that he had taken the catch inside the rope. There was still drama to follow as number 10 Tawanda Mupariwa slapped 19 from the penultimate over, delivered by Kevin O’Brien, to leave Zimbabwe needing seven from the last six balls. However, Alex Cusack held his nerve as he claimed the final two wickets, first getting Regis Chakabva to drag on before Mupariwa skied a catch William Porterfield gratefully accepted. While Joyce’s 112 earned him the man-of-the-match award Cusack’s four for 32 was just as invaluable, especially after he removed Zimbabwe skipper Brendon Taylor for 121. Victory was Ireland’s second over a full-member nation at the tournament after they opened their campaign with a win over West Indies. They will, however, most likely need to pull off one more shock in their final two pool games against India and Pakistan. Pakistan’s surprise win over South Africa earlier in the day did Ireland few favours and their clash in Adelaide on March 15 looms as a potential decider. Joyce became the fourth Ireland player to score a World Cup century although he was given a helping hand by a sloppy Zimbabwe fielding display. Press Association Ed Joyce’s third one-day international century helped Ireland post 331 for eight – their highest ever score at a World Cup – but Zimbabwe looked like running down the record chase until a debatable John Mooney catch. Replays appeared to show Mooney had stepped on the rope when he held on to remove Sean Williams, who was four short of a century and seemingly in control of the pursuit. Ireland clung on to claim a controversial five-run win over Zimbabwe to keep their bid to reach the World Cup quarter-finals on track.last_img read more