Governor Wolf Announces Disaster Relief Funding Available for Philadelphia, Delaware County Farms

first_img Environment,  Human Services,  Press Release,  Public Health,  Weather Safety Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today notified farmland owners in Philadelphia and Delaware counties that they are eligible to receive disaster relief funding from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).“This year was unprecedented and unpredictable, with weather conditions that challenged farmers across the state,” said Governor Wolf. “This funding will be crucial to help those producers protect their investments and recoup some of their losses. I encourage anyone eligible in Philadelphia or Delaware counties to apply for this valuable federal relief.”The funding will help with losses caused by disasters that occurred during the 2018 crop year, such as excessive heat and drought. It is the result of a Secretarial disaster declaration and can include emergency loans from the federal Farm Service Agency (FSA).Eligible farmers can apply for loans for up to eight months after a Secretarial disaster declaration, and should contact their local FSA office for assistance. More information on USDA’s disaster assistance program, including county lists and maps, can be found at http://disaster.fsa.usda.gov. Governor Wolf Announces Disaster Relief Funding Available for Philadelphia, Delaware County Farms November 08, 2018center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Worker Safety in Grain Facilities

first_imgINDIANAPOLIS — As local farm workers prepare for this year’s harvest, the Indiana Department of Labor reminds employers and employees about grain handling facility hazards and how to prevent occupational injuries and fatalities.On July 10, 2014 a 9-year-old boy died after falling into a grain bin in Lancaster, Wis., underscoring the dangerous conditions of grain facilities. In June 2013 a Hoosier farm worker in LaPorte County was killed in a grain bin accident.Grain bins across the U.S. have killed more than 180 people and injured more than 675 since 1980. Grain dust is highly flammable and is the number one cause of grain bin explosions.“The safety of our farm workers is of paramount importance to our Indiana agriculture industry,” said Commissioner Rick J. Ruble. “Grain handling facilities are extremely dangerous, and workers must recognize the dangers and take all necessary precautions.”Employees working in or near grain handling facilities should never work alone because they are exposed to significant occupational safety and health hazards including falls, electrocution, engulfment, auger entanglement and dust explosions. Working with a partner ensures help is always nearby.Additionally, employers and employees can reduce the likelihood of worker injury, illness or death by taking the following precautions:Prevent falls: Provide all employees with a body harness and lifeline, or a boatswains chair, and ensure it is properly secured before entering a grain bin. Prevent dust explosions: Prior to entry, test the air within a bin or silo for the presence of combustible and toxic gases and make sure there is sufficient oxygen for safe entry.Employers and employees are strongly encouraged to learn about safe grain handling procedures and take the necessary precautions. To learn more about safe grain handling practices click here. Prevent electrocution and auger entanglement: Before grain bin or silo entry, shut down and lock out all equipment power sources. Station an observer outside the bin or silo to continuously monitor and track the employee inside the bin.center_img Prevent engulfment: Prohibit employees from walking-down the grain or using similar practices to make the grain flow. Prohibit entry into bins or silos underneath a bridging condition or where there is a build-up of grain products on side walls that could shift and bury a worker.last_img read more