The Brisbane suburb with only one five-bedroom house for sale

first_imgHiding behind this walled petition in the ensuite is the shower cubicle.“There is no glass anywhere, no shower screen, it is very easy to keep clean,” Mrs Moroney said.“And we only discovered that after living here.”More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus13 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market13 hours agoThe property is being sold by Burton & Ryan Property Agents — Grange and private inspections are welcome.The two-storey house on a 405sq m block originally attracted them because of its generous-sized bedrooms and proximity to the city and airport. But we think the walk-in wardrobe is the most impressive room in the house.Downstairs there is a large island bench in the kitchen, with a glass window instead of a splashback to open side views of the garden, as well as the rear view across the patio to the inground pool and hedges beyond. MORE REAL ESTATE STORIES The master bedroom is large at 5.2m x 3.8m.Their son was 17 and daughter 20 when they moved here, and the upstairs bedroom configuration has helped give everyone personal space.There is a sitting area leading to the master bedroom at one end of the house, and at the other end, two bedrooms open out to a retreat with access to the front balcony.center_img This is the only five-bedroom house for sale in Kedron at the moment.IT’S only 7km to the Brisbane CBD and almost a quarter of the population is preparing to return to school tomorrow, but this Brisbane suburb currently has only one five-bedroom house for sale.Kedron is a professional hub in Brisbane whose population grew 8.6 per cent between the 2011 and 2016 census periods. In the last 10 years, the number of five-bedroom houses to sell each year has ranged from three to 18 according to CoreLogic property data and so far this year, five five-bedroom house have sold.But on realestate.com.au there is only one five-bedroom house currently for sale in Kedron, and that makes 42 Moree St, Kedron a rare but very valuable proposition for families wanting a spacious home in this part of the city.For Julie and Sean Moroney and their two children, space and cleverly designed bathrooms have been standout features.And if they decide to build when they move to Melbourne, recreating the bathrooms they have come to love over the past four years will be a top priority. The open-plan living area which continues out to the patio.“I’m in the kitchen now with my laptop set up on the bench, this is a place I always come to, I might be reading the paper or on the laptop.“We’ve got four bar stools here but you can fit another one in.”last_img read more

(Only 13) Doctors helping patients die as assisted death debate rolls on (by Stuff-ed)

first_imgDoctors helping patients die as assisted death debate rolls onStuff co.nz 13 July 2015More than one in ten doctors have helped a patient die despite potentially breaking the law, a survey suggests.In a fax poll of general practitioners, conducted by magazine New Zealand Doctor and IMS Health, nearly 12 per cent of respondents said they had helped a patient die. About two out of five doctors also said they had been asked to help a patient die, although most had refused.The poll, reported in New Zealand Doctor was based on the responses from 110 doctors, which means about 13 doctors admitted to helping a patient die.It comes after terminally ill Wellington lawyer Seales’ high-profile court battle to seek legal clarification for doctors, allowing them to help terminally ill patients die at a time of their choosing without risking prosecution. Seales died of a brain tumour on June 5, living long enough to be told the judge in the case, Justice David Collins, had decided it was still against the law for doctors to help their patients to die.But the issue remains strongly contested and the poll suggested the medical community also remains divided. Of those surveyed, 45.5 per cent believed the law needed to change to legally protect doctors who helped terminally ill patients die, compared to 44.5 per cent who did not.Some doctors responding to the survey said even if they weren’t helping patients die, pain relief could effectively have the same outcome.http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/70184652/Doctors-helping-patients-die-as-assisted-death-debate-rolls-onlast_img read more