Bar investments post gains

first_imgA new investment policy begun by the Bar almost 12 years ago has weathered two recessions while more than doubling the Bar’s initial investment.And despite turbulent markets in recent months, it has made money for the Bar in the past year.Investment Committee Chair David Bianchi told the Board of Governors recently that the Bar started in September 1990 with an investment account of $9.2 million. The new policy allowed the Bar to invest in stocks and bonds, where previously it had been restricted to certificates of deposit.Since that time, the Bar has earned $9.8 million, of which about $5 million has been used to finance continuing Bar operations and the remainder left in the investment pool, which is now nearly $14 million, Bianchi said.In the past 12 months, the Bar has received a 5.8-percent return, he said, while the indexes the Bar uses to measure performance have averaged 3.8 percent.The committee recommended, and the board approved, a change in the way short-term investments are made. Bianchi said the Bar’s financial advisors recommended no longer investing in short-term commercial notes, but continuing to invest in money market accounts while adding one-to-three year term U.S. Treasury notes and bonds in a bond mutual fund. Bar investments post gains June 15, 2002 Regular Newscenter_img Bar investments post gainslast_img read more

Villa and Swans share points

first_imgAston Villa ended their losing run but there was little respite for under-fire manager Paul Lambert as they ground out a 1-1 draw with Swansea. Press Association It was a meeting of two out-of-form teams, with Villa having lost their previous four matches while Swansea were without a win in five. The hosts scored in the first half at Villa Park for the first time this Barclays Premier League season through Gabriel Agbonlahor in the seventh minute but Swansea piled on the pressure and got their reward when Roland Lamah equalised eight minutes before half-time. The Welsh side dominated the second half but were unable to find a winner. Swansea boss Michael Laudrup made seven changes from the defeat by Chelsea on Boxing Day, while Villa had midfielder Ashley Westwood back after suspension. The hosts had left the field to jeers after losing at home to Crystal Palace on Thursday but they began positively, pressing high up the pitch and wasting no time breaking forward. They got their reward in the seventh minute as Andreas Weimann picked up the ball on the right and played in Agbonlahor, who exploited dreadful positioning by the Swansea defence and found himself all alone on the edge of the penalty area. The striker hesitated but then showed good composure to place the ball under Gerhard Tremmel. It was just what Villa needed, but as the half wore on Swansea became more and more dominant. Their first chance came in the 17th minute when Pablo Hernandez cut inside and tested Brad Guzan, who initially spilled the ball but quickly gathered it. Three minutes later the visitors should have been level but Ben Davies headed the ball into the ground and over the bar from six yards when he was picked out by Jonathan De Guzman’s corner. Villa threatened sporadically but their periods of possession were fleeting and the pressure continued to grow at the other end. The visiting fans celebrated erroneously when Antonio Luna’s poor clearance fell to De Guzman on the edge of the area and he flashed a shot just wide. But two minutes later Swansea were level, Jonjo Shelvey picking out the lively Hernandez on the left and his cross was headed in at the back post by Lamah. Guzan got an arm to the header but could not keep it out. The home fans again expressed their disgruntlement at the half-time whistle, and the pattern continued at the start of the second half. Guzan was called into action again in the 52nd minute, tipping over De Guzman’s free-kick, before Wilfried Bony fired well over the bar. Shelvey was the next to try his luck but his shot was blocked five yards out by Luna and Bony was unable to get to the rebound. The worry for the visitors was they were not testing Guzan nearly enough and there was always the danger that Villa could hit them on the break. Agbonlahor at least tried a shot at goal for the hosts in the 71st minute but it was from 25 yards and flew well over the bar. A goal appeared much more likely at the other end, and Villa did well to block Bony’s dangerous shot before Shelvey’s cross just evaded two Swansea players. Lambert sent on Karim El Ahmadi, Libor Kozak and Marc Albrighton in a bid to give Villa more attacking impetus but they were struggling to string two passes together. Fabian Delph, one bright spot for Villa this season, tested Tremmel with a well-struck shot but it was straight at the Swansea keeper. That turned out to be the final chance and there were again boos as referee Roger East blew the final whistle. last_img read more

Kamyszek sticks to strict daily routine to excel for Syracuse cross-country

first_imgReed Kamyszek is always taking some sort of course.First, there are the Syracuse courses. With his biochemistry major complete, the senior concentrates on his other major, ethics and his psychology minor.Then there are the medical school applications — the top ones, this side of the Mississippi River, Kamyszek needs to stay the course and finish.And lastly, 2–3 hours per day, six days a week, he spends on an actual course as a top runner on the Syracuse men’s cross-country team. The team is ranked sixth in the nation, which prepares for the Atlantic Coast Conference championships in three weeks. Time management and organization are keys to his success because, for him, running and school are the same.When it comes to his 4.0 GPA, his NCAA Elite 89 award and an eighth overall finish in Syracuse’s most recent meet, he approaches all of these with the same mind-set and a methodical game plan.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“In cross-country, there are four or five major races during your season,” he said. “In a class, there are four or five major exams.”He admitted that the spacing of these tests might differ between the two areas, but he stressed that consistency is the biggest part.“There’s a difference between simply going to lecture and paying attention,” he said. “And the same thing goes for practice. Are you mentally up for (either)?”Every day starts at 7:25 a.m. on the same street corner, where a group of cross-country teammates get an early run in. Then comes breakfast — mostly organic food he cooks himself — before lectures, workouts, dinner, homework and 8–9 hours of sleep to finish the day.And his attention to detail was fostered at a young age.“We had high expectations. We harked on the kids, ‘My name’s attached to you, don’t mess it up,’” Kamyszek’s father, Eric, said with a laugh about his and his wife Dawn’s parenting style.In school, he consistently received top marks in the classroom and impressed athletically. In sixth grade, during a mandatory mile run for gym class, Kamyszek flew to a 5:30 time.Kamyszek dropped hockey his freshman year at Kenowa Hills High School in Michigan and went under the tutelage of Greg Meyer — who won the Boston Marathon in 1983 and before this year, was the last American to do so. Meyer trained any and all high school kids in the Grand Rapids, Michigan area.Any skill level was welcome and it was free.Kamyszek soon began dominating his conference. By junior year, he won the Division II cross-country state championship in the fall and the 2-mile event in track in the spring. He was so successful running that he began to lose, on purpose — but only to his teammates.During the regular season, he would slow up toward the end of meets and allow his teammates to pass him across the finish line. He wanted to share the spotlight and give his teammates ink in the paper.He did this because Kamyszek is only competitive with himself, not his teammates or opponents.“I don’t like to lay out what I’m going to do beforehand,” Kamyszek said when asked if he trash talks. “Everyone’s there to learn, so why would you hinder someone’s ability to do that?”This comes from the Midwestern sensibility Syracuse coach Chris Fox can’t help but mention when discussing Kamyszek.“He only does things that make sense,” he said. “He’s very calculating.”On a team-wide scale, Kamyszek said, it doesn’t matter who’s the first or fifth man because everyone has to pass the person in front of them to help the team. Especially because points matter so much, particularly in championships, and that’s where the Orange will be in just three short weeks.Until then, Kamyszek will stay on course, repeating his routine, because he knows that’s the quickest way to success.“The last thing you want to do (is get overwhelmed),” Kamyszek said. “If that happens, your work suffers — and that’s the last thing you want to happen.” Comments Published on October 15, 2014 at 12:05 am Contact Sam: sjfortie@syr.edu | @Sam4TR Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more