Two species thought to be extinct re-discovered + Dolphins get high on purpose

first_imgToday marks 100 years since the Grand Canyon was designated as a national park. To celebrate, the park will host special events and programs at the park and throughout Arizona during the centennial year. Although afforded federal protection in 1893, the Grand Canyon did not achieve national park status until 1919, three years after the formation of the National Park Service. The Grand Canyon National Park Act, which officially made the Grand Canyon a national park, was signed by President Woodrow Wilson and considered an early success of the conservation movement. Today the Grand Canyon is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and welcomes more than 6 million domestic and international tourists a year. Grand Canyon National Park Turns 100 Elephants get drunk on overripe fruit, horses eat hallucinogenic weeds, and now, it appears, dolphins may get high off of pufferfish. Footage from a new BBC documentary, “Spy in the Pod,” reveals dolphins purposely coming into contact with toxic pufferfish, which release a potent defensive chemical when threatened. In small doses, the toxin appears to put the dolphins into a trance-like state. The dolphins were filmed playfully passing the toxic pufferfish between them for 20 or 30 minutes and at one point were observed floating just beneath the surface of the water, apparently mesmerized by their own reflections. A zoologist with the film said that the dolphins’ handling of the pufferfish implied that it was not their first time interacting with the fish in this way. Another species feared extinct, the Fernandina Giant Tortoise, was also discovered last week on a remote Galapagos Island. The species had not been seen in more than 110 years when scientists found a single female tortoise, believed to be more than a century old. Scientists think there may be more living Fernandina Giant Tortoises on the island due to tracks and scat they found. The tortoise was taken to a breeding center for giant tortoises on Santa Cruz Island in the Galapagos. Cue Beyoncé’s “All the Single Ladies.” A single female Wallace’s giant bee, feared extinct for 38 years, was discovered on the Indonesian island of the North Moluccas last week. The world’s largest bee, four times the size of a honeybee, was found living inside a termite’s nest in a tree. The bee’s habitat is threatened by deforestation, and its size makes it a target for collectors. Two species, both thought to be extinct, recently re-discovered in Indonesia and Ecuador Dolphins may use toxic pufferfish to get highlast_img read more

New suicide prevention resources launched in Donegal

first_imgThree new information resources were launched by Connecting for Life Donegal today to promote awareness of suicide risk.Mr  John Meehan, Director of the National Office for Suicide Prevention introduced the resources at an event today in the Vestry, St Conals, Letterkenny as part of World Suicide Prevention Week.The Resources include a poster outlining the key services and phone numbers to contact in a mental health crisis, GP Patient Pathway for those experiencing a suicidal crisis, and a Family Information Pack to be issued when a loved one is admitted to the acute psychiatric unit. Photo Clive WassonThese resources are the latest developments from the Connecting for Life Donegal suicide prevention action plan, aimed at promoting awareness of suicide risk within the county.Connecting for Life Donegal was launched in 2015 and since then there has been a huge commitment from the health and other statutory organisations and the community and voluntary sector to lead on and support the implementation of actions.John Meehan, Director of the National office for Suicide Prevention at Connecting for Life Donegal. Photo Clive WassonDuring the development of Connecting for Life Donegal an extensive public consultation process took place which highlighted a lack of information about support services among individuals in distress and their families. In response a poster has been developed which outlines key services and contact numbers available in a mental health crisis. This will be publicly available across the county in a range of settings including GP and other health settings, workplaces and a variety of other public and social venues.An online version has already been distributed through the Chamber of Commerce Facebook page. An Irish version of the poster is also available. The public is encouraged to ‘take a photo’ of the poster so that the information is close to hand should they or someone they are concerned about ever need it. Inspector, Gretty Sheridan, encourages guest at the sucide prevention launch to take photographs of the poster with sucide help line and support details. Photo Clive WassonGPs are often the first point of contact for individuals in distress.  In collaboration with the mental health service, GPs and the Emergency Department in Letterkenny University Hospital, the ‘Managing  Suicide Risk in General Practice’ resource has been developed.This pathway provides a structured guide for GPs to ensure that individuals, depending on their level of suicide risk, are directed to the most appropriate service. The pathway will be distributed to every GP in the county immediately.Consultation with families bereaved by suicide (as part of a study conducted by the National Suicide Research Foundation (NSRF)) highlighted the need for additional information and support during times of a mental health crisis including admission to the psychiatric inpatient unit.Dr Collette Corry, Senior Research Psychologist NSRF. Photo Clive WassonSpeaking at the launch Dr Collette Cory, NSRF discussed the development of a Family Information Pack stating “This Pack addresses the important issues and questions which family members may have on admission of a loved one to the acute inpatient unit, such as how to explain mental health problems to children and how to support a family member following discharge from the acute inpatient unit.“This pack will be given to family members following admission of a family member to the inpatient unit. We are hopeful that it will prove to be an invaluable resource to family members”. John Hayes, Chief Officer Community Health Service at Connecting for Life Donegal. Photo Clive WassonAnne Sheridan, Mental Health Promotion and Suicide Resource Officer at Connecting for Life Donegal . Photo Clive WassonCliff Hayley, clinical Director Donegal Mental Health Services. Photo Clive WassonThe launch was attended by a number of HSE staff including Mr John Meehan, Director of the National office for Suicide Prevention as well as representatives from voluntary organisations and representatives from media outlets throughout Donegal.New suicide prevention resources launched in Donegal was last modified: September 11th, 2017 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more