A credit union man: Part 3

first_img 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr During college summers, Dad guided my brother, sister, and I to work at credit unions. We met amazing people, with whom we have stayed in touch while learning valuable lessons in enhancing the member experience. Talking with my siblings on their credit union days, one story in particular highlights the extent we all go through to enhance the member experience. Kirby Kangaroo Club is a popular and effective way for children to learn to “spend, save, and share.” Bobby, my younger brother, worked at a Kirby Kangaroo credit union and was asked to play Kirby at the Halloween festival. Between giving kids high fives and taking pictures, Bobby kept laughing to himself and thinking about a scene from the comedy “Old School” when Vince Vaughn’s character, Beanie, is throwing a birthday party for his son. One of the fraternity brothers nicknamed Spanish is dressed as an elephant mascot and takes off his mask.Beanie: Spanish, what the he(ck) are you doing?Spanish: I’m just going to get some water. This suit is crazy hot, yo.Beanie: Put your head back on. That can be very traumatic for the kids.Spanish: You’re right, I’m sorry, sir.Beanie: Don’t sorry me, babe. And shake the tail when you walk. You’re better than that.And that last line, “shake your tail when you walk. You’re better than that” captures the point. Whatever roles you happen to be playing today, give it your all and remember the details. In the credit union business we are free to work with our heads held high because our job is to help our neighbor. Enhancing the member experience is not a means to an end; enhancing the member experience is an end in itself. continue reading »last_img read more

Over 160 rights groups call on IOC chief to revoke 2022 Beijing Winter Games

first_imgLast month, prominent Uighur rights group World Uighur Congress launched a similar appeal to the IOC over what it said were crimes against humanity in Xinjiang.The IOC responded that would remain neutral on political issues and said it had received assurances from Chinese authorities that they would respect the principles of the Olympic charter.The IOC did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Wednesday.China has already made extensive preparations for the upcoming Games, which they say are on track to be held from Feb. 4-20, 2022.There was similar outcry from rights groups ahead of the 2008 Beijing Olympics. At the time, the IOC defended the choice, saying the Games were a force for good.  Over 160 human rights advocacy groups have delivered a joint letter to the chief of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) calling for it to reconsider its choice to award China the 2022 Winter Games in light of Beijing’s human rights record.It is the largest such coordinated effort so far following several months of similar calls from individual rights groups, and comes as Beijing is facing increased international backlash over policies including its treatment of ethnic Uighurs in Xinjiang and new security laws in Hong Kong.”The IOC must recognize that the Olympic spirit and the reputation of the Olympic Games will suffer further damage if the worsening human rights crisis, across all areas under China’s control, is simply ignored,” said the letter, which was released on Tuesday. The letter argues that the prestige of the Beijing 2008 Olympics emboldened the government to take further actions, including programs targeting Xinjiang Uighurs and other ethnic policies.China’s Foreign Ministry did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the letter, but has on many occasions fiercely defended its rights record.It maintains policies in Xinjiang, Tibet and Hong Kong are key to national security and social stability.Among the letter’s signatories are Uighur, Tibetan, Hong Kong and Mongolian rights groups based in Asia, Europe, North America, Africa and Australia.center_img Topics :last_img read more