Buried Child, Starring Ed Harris & Amy Madigan, Extends Off-Broadway

first_img Buried Child ‘Buried Child’ Buried Child is a hit before it even starts performances! Led by Oscar nominees and real-life husband and wife Ed Harris and Amy Madigan, the production will now play off-Broadway through March 27; it has previously been set to shutter on March 13. Directed by Scott Elliott, the New Group revival of Sam Shepard’s play will begin previews on February 2 at the Pershing Square Signature Center’s Alice Griffin Jewel Box Theatre. Opening night is scheduled for February 17.The cast will also include Taissa Farmiga, Larry Pine, Rich Sommer, Paul Sparks and Nat Wolff.Shepard’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play Buried Child returns 20 years after its last major New York production. Dodge (Harris) and Halie (Madigan) are barely hanging on to their farmland and their sanity while looking after their two wayward grown sons Tilden (Sparks) and Bradley (Sommer). When their grandson Vince (Wolff) arrives with his girlfriend Shelly (Farmiga), no one seems to recognize him, and confusion abounds. As Vince tries to make sense of the chaos, the rest of the family dances around a deep, dark secret. Pine will play Father Dewis. Related Showscenter_img Show Closed This production ended its run on April 3, 2016 View Commentslast_img read more

NASA Drops Racially Charged Nicknames of Celestial Bodies

first_imgFor example, “Eskimo Nebula” and “Siamese Twins Galaxy” will no longer be used.“Nicknames are often more approachable and public-friendly than official names for cosmic objects, such as Barnard 33, whose nickname ‘the Horsehead Nebula’ invokes its appearance,” NASA said in a release last week. “But often seemingly innocuous nicknames can be harmful and detract from the science.”Additionally, NASA is examining its use of phrases for planets, galaxies and other cosmic objects “as part of its commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion.”As we work to identify & address systemic discrimination & inequality in all aspects of the scientific community, we are reexamining the use of unofficial terminology for cosmic objects which can be not only insensitive, but actively harmful. Read more: https://t.co/ZNicp5g0Wh pic.twitter.com/jDup6JOGBd— NASA (@NASA) August 5, 2020 NASA is apparently taking a cue from grocery store items, pro sports teams, and country music bands which have all removed racially insensitive names in recent weeks and months.The space agency just announced it is adding celestial bodies to the list that already includes Aunt Jemima, the Washington Football Team and hitmakers The Chicks and Lady A. The space agency goes on to say that it “will use only the official, International Astronomical Union designations in cases where nicknames are inappropriate.”Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington, DC, explains, “Science is for everyone, and every facet of our work needs to reflect that value.”Last June, Dreyer’s Grand Ice Cream said it was dropping the brand “Eskimo Pie” after a century. The word is commonly used in Alaska to refer to Inuit and Yupik people, according to the Alaska Native Language Center at the University of Alaska.“This name is considered derogatory in many other places because it was given by non-Inuit people and was said to mean ‘eater of raw meat,’” the company stated at the time.“Siamese twins” is considered to be an antiquated expression for conjoined twins, based on brothers from Siam (now Thailand) who were used as sideshow freaks in the 19th century.last_img read more