Partners Group buys out investors in Nordic Niam portfolio

first_imgPartners Group has bought a real estate portfolio in Finland and Sweden for €300m at a discount on the secondary market.The Swiss private market investment manager acquired the retail and office properties from investors in a fund managed by Nordic investment manager Niam.The 380,000sqm portfolio, built up in 2006-07, comprised the remaining assets in Niam Fund III.The fund will be wound up, but Niam will continue to manage the properties with Partners Group. Fund manager Urban Ehrling said he was leaving Niam following the transaction.Partners Group said it “provided an off-market solution, allowing an exit for investors and time to maximise the value creation potential of all remaining assets over the next 3-5 years”.Fabian Neuenschwander, vice-president in real estate secondaries, said: “The Finnish and Swedish real estate markets will continue to perform well in the coming years, and we see this transaction as a unique opportunity for our clients to benefit from this development.”As part of the deal, done in June and July, Partners Group was involved in negotiating the refinancing of all the portfolio’s existing debt facilities, as well as the buyout of minority shareholders and joint-venture partners.It was also involved in preparing a mezzanine facility in the capital structure of one of the investments at preferential terms.Niam said it would work with Partners Group over the next few years to execute a strategy for generating value in the properties.Pekka Salakka, senior director at Niam, said: “Niam is very familiar with these properties because we have been successfully operating these assets since the build-up of the portfolio.”Partners Group has made a number of transactions on the secondary market in recent years.Last month it said it bought 31 investors out of the $1bn (€776m) troubled Chinese property fund Trophy Property Development.last_img read more

Silent but deadly: Freshman wing Johnson brings reserved personality to SU bench

first_imgShe seemed puzzled by the question. She said she misses her “sweetheart” dearly while he’s at school. When she first opened the door to the Melo Center, she said, “Where’s my son? Where’s my son?” And she loved going to every one of his games at Lower Merion High School in Pennsylvania. She knew all of that. But a more challenging question stumped her. His mother Sharon Dash watched intently from two feet to his right. Johnson’s aunt, uncle and cousin surrounded her. Dash listened as her son mentioned that he can’t swim, his favorite villain is the Joker and he loves any kind of rice. AdvertisementThis is placeholder text From his standard, squeaky-clean white, size 14 Jordans up to his No. 2 jersey and orange headband, everything was traditional. No Ron Patterson wacky hair. No DaJuan Coleman outlandish tattoos. No Jerami Grant irreversible grin. “At one point in time I thought you had to stick a pin in him to get him to wake up,” Bobby Johnson said. “He was always laid back, and I would always tell him, ‘When you come out on the floor, we don’t need that cool sh*t.’” But she couldn’t pinpoint anything that stood out about him. The banter continued. Dash and her sister Michelle Scott quipped about just how quiet Johnson is. “Noooo,” Dash responded, incredulously looking at her sister, taking a step back and jerking her head downward in disbelief. “I think he talks too much,” Scott said. Published on November 6, 2013 at 3:28 am Contact Trevor: tbhass@syr.edu | @TrevorHass “He’s just such a plain kid,” Dash said. “Baby, you’ve got to get interesting.” But Johnson’s father Bobby Johnson, who played professional basketball in Portugal and Germany, is the antithesis of quiet. When Bobby grew up in South Philadelphia, the culture was completely different. Jawing and trash talk was incessant. It was the expectation. You had to go out there and play and shut those people up, Bobby Johnson said. If you didn’t, you’d never come back on the floor again.Johnson and his father used to wake up at 6 a.m. and head to Lower Merion to work out for an hour. Johnson was dedicated throughout, Bobby said, but he didn’t always show enthusiasm on the court. B.J. Johnson stood firmly in place with his hands behind his back on the outskirts of the Carmelo K. Anthony Basketball Center gym during media day on Oct. 18. “I was being facetious,” Scott responded wryly. Facebook Twitter Google+ Then Johnson flashed a golden smile, revealing a slight gap between his two front teeth. He swayed back and forth, clearly uncomfortable by the entire situation. Johnson, who’s only 17, is as quiet as they come, according to his relatives. But his reserved nature and tendency to fly under the radar made him lethal in high school and may help him earn a spot in the Syracuse rotation. Comments He didn’t hear his son swear until he was 15 or 16.“I think the first time I actually heard him yell out the four-letter word he was playing at one of the practices and he was like ‘F*ck!’” Bobby Johnson said. “I was like, ‘OK, you do care.’”Before Lower Merion’s state championship game against Chester (Pa.) High School, Johnson and his father drove to the rehabilitation center because Johnson had sprained his ankle and needed treatment. Bobby tried to elicit some sort of enthusiasm out of his son — to make sure he was ready for the biggest game of his high school career.After losing to Chester three years in a row, Johnson and the Aces were out for revenge. But Johnson was calm, unfazed by the pressure of the situation.“I got ’em, dad,” he said coolly.“He got ’em!” Bobby said. Lower Merion beat Chester 63-47, ending the Clippers’ 78-game in-state winning streak. Johnson finished with 22 points and 11 rebounds. But the fire was never fully there. When Bobby Johnson first watched his son play at Lower Merion, he sat there wondering if the other fans would get riled up like he did.“When I first went to the games, the Lower Merion people are sitting there like it’s a cricket match,” Bobby said. “I remember being like, ‘What the — ain’t anybody going to get the guys going?’”Months later, removed from one of the most dominant stints at Lower Merion since Kobe Bryant’s hey-day, Johnson comes to SU as the No. 17 small forward in the class of 2013. Yet on media day, few reporters come his way. He stands far from the center of attention as reporters crowd around stars C.J. Fair and Grant. Most people don’t expect Johnson to play much this season. He may not. But his quiet confidence will help prepare him if he does. He’s not a blue-chipper, 5-star guy, Bobby said, but he works every day.“Sometimes it’s better to be that guy that comes in under the radar and just does what he needs to do,” Bobby said. “Then all of a sudden everybody’s saying, ‘I knew he would be that guy.’”Bobby Johnson recalls asking his son a question back in high school. “It was funny because I asked B.J., ‘Suppose this summer you really blew up and had Roy Williams knocking on your door. Would you want to go to North Carolina?“And he was like, ‘No.’“I said ‘If Coach K was knocking on your door, would you want to go to Duke?’“And he was like, ‘No.’“He had a plan, and it’s what he wanted to do.”Now Johnson’s ready to live out the dream he has had since seventh grade: star at Syracuse. Jim Boeheim said Johnson has surprised the coaching staff up to this point. He’s young, but he can ball. “I’m just really excited to be here and for the season to start,” Johnson said. “That’s pretty much all I’ve been waiting for and now it’s here.” “What’s the most fascinating thing about B.J.?” a reporter asked. last_img read more

Okagbare Runs First Sub-11secs in Almost Two Years

first_imgMany local athletics watchers had been doubting Okagbare’s ability to bounce back after a rather disappointing 2016 season when she not only failed to race inside 11 seconds in the 100m but also could not make the final of the event at the Rio Olympics.The last time she ran a sub-11 seconds in the 100m was way back in September 2015 at the IAAF Diamond League meeting in Zurich where she closed her season with a 10.98 seconds performance.Interestingly, the Nigerian ran an incredible six sub-11 seconds in the 100m that season, topping it with the 10.80 seconds she ran at the IAAF Diamond League meeting at the Stade De France in Paris on July 4. It was her and Nigeria’s second fastest 100m time ever.It was also the third fastest time in the world that year. Okagbare broke 11 seconds for the first time in 2012 when she ran 10.96 seconds to place second in the first semi-final at the IAAF Diamond League meeting in Crystal Palace, London on July 14.She ran three more sub-11 seconds to close the season with a 10.92 personal best on August 4 at the Olympics in London.She ran three more the following year with an incredible 10.79 seconds performance to become the first Nigerian nay African woman to break 10.80 seconds in the 100m.It was then a new African record which proved to be the second fastest in the world that year behind Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pyrce’s IAAF World-title winning 10.71 seconds performance in Moscow.In 2014,Okagbare broke 11 seconds thrice like she did the previous year and ended the season with a 10.85 seconds personal season’s best which not only fetched her the Commonwealth Games gold but also ensured she ended the year with the second fastest time in the world, again behind USA’s Torie Bowie (10.80 seconds).The following year she ran six times inside 11 seconds and was on course to becoming the first Nigerian to win a 100m medal at the IAAF Worlds in Beijing but wishes refused to turn to horses as she finished last in the final. Last year she did not legally break 11 seconds as the 10.92 seconds she ran at the Istvan Guylai Memorial Grand Prix in Hungary on July 18 was aided by a +2.6 metres per second trailing wind which rendered it illegal.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram *Picks bronze in IAAF Diamond League in LondonReigning Nigeria sprint queen Blessing Okagbare-Ighoteguonor on Sunday at the IAAF Diamond League meeting in London ran 10.99 seconds, her first sub-11 seconds performance of the season to place third behind Jamaica’s Elaine Thompson (10.94) and Dutch girl, Dafne Schippers (10.97). She has thus raced back to reckoning ahead of next month’s 16th IAAF World Championships also in London.It was the Nigerian’s first sub-11 seconds performance in the 100m in over 21 months and 17th of a very storied career since she raced into the limelight in Abuja on July 25 when she won her first national title in the blue ribband event.last_img read more