Gold Coast family selling their house named after ‘The Castle’ holiday home

first_imgOwners Toni and Chris Kennedy proudly display a sign that reads “Bonnie Doon” at the entrance to their Macadie Way home.It’s a nod to the 1997 Australian comedy-drama about the Kerrigan family’s fight to save their home from the compulsory acquisition of developers who wanted to expand the neighbouring airport. The owners say it’s their own slice of serenity.After more than a decade living on the 3.42ha property, the couple have decided to sell it so they can move closer to the water.It is listed on the market with a $2.895 million asking price.Mrs Kennedy said they bought it because her husband wanted space at home for his horses.Over the years, they have chipped away at renovating the three-bedroom, two bathroom house, which even has a “pool room”.“It was over 10 years, we just did bits and pieces as we could afford it,” Mrs Kennedy said.It is much more modern than the film’s holiday home but Mrs Kennedy said it was still a family home. The Gold Coast’s “Bonnie Doon” home at 73 Macadie Way, Merrimac.“WE’RE goin’ to Bonnie Doon”. It’s slightly bigger and much more modern than the holiday home made famous in Australian cult classic The Castle but this Gold Coast property promises the same sense of serenity. There’s plenty of land for horses. Imagine waking up to this every day.The family also had a holiday house in Bonnie Doon, Victoria, where they regularly went to enjoy the “serenity”.“How’s the serenity,” Darryl Kerrigan, played by Michael Caton, famously said in the movie.Mrs Kennedy said Bonnie Doon was where the family went to “be really happy”, and their beloved Merrimac home made them feel the same.“It was all about the serenity – that’s what this place is,” Mrs Kennedy said.“That’s our Bonnie Doon.” Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:44Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:44 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p288p288p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenHow to bid at auction for your dream home? 01:45 More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa14 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days agoIt has a much more modern interior than the Kerrigan’s holiday home.center_img The house has undergone an extensive renovation over the past 10 years. The Kerrigans at Bonnie Doon in film The Castle. It has three bedrooms. “The most important thing about that place is that it’s a family home,” she said.“It’s a beautiful home to live in – it’s light, bright, airy and comfortable.“My husband is broken hearted about leaving it behind, he loves the land as much as I love the water.”She said they were going to miss it.***TOP 10 QUOTES FROM THE CASTLE “Tell him he’s dreaming” – Translation: What to tell the bloke from the Trading Post asking way too much for jousting sticks or ergonomic chairs. “We’re going to Bonnie Doon. We’re going to Bonnie Doon” – Translation: The repetitive song you should sing when driving to Bonnie Doon. “How’s the serenity? So much serenity” – Translation: What to say when you’re feeling calm and content. Or you just like saying the word serenity. “Dale dug a hole. Tell ‘em Dale” – Translation: Dale dug a hole. His dad was pretty proud. “Suffer in your jocks” – Translation: A scornful phrase to tell another person after victory. E.g. Perfect for saying to the opposing counsel after winning a court case. “It’s not a house. It’s a home” – Translation: When a property is built with more than bricks and mortar – it’s built with memories and love. “It’s the vibe of it. It’s the Constitution. It’s Mabo. It’s justice. It’s law. It’s the vibe an ah, no that’s it. It’s the vibe. I rest my case” – Translation: How not to win a court case. “What doyou call this?” “Chicken” – Translation: The excited phrase to say at the start of every meal, regardless of what’s in front of you. “Dad reckoned that fishing was 10% brain and 95% muscle. And the rest was just good luck” – Translation: Pretty self-explanatory. If you don’t get it, maybe you’re missing out on the 10% brains part. “This is going straight to the pool room” – Translation: I’m so chuffed with this thoughtful present, I’m putting it on display for all to see.(Source: Screen Australia) *** ”How’s the serenity?”last_img read more

Family advocacy can be political and charitable, rules New Zealand judge

first_imgMercatorNet 1 July 2015A New Zealand organisation promoting the natural family has won a decision from the country’s High Court that its political activities do not necessarily disqualify it as a charity.Justice Collins ruled that Family First NZ’s advocacy of the traditional family makes it similar to “organisations that have advocated for the ‘mental and moral improvement’ of society” – that is, one of the classic types of charitable activity.Family First was granted charitable status by the then Charities Commission in May 2007 but was served notice of deregistration by the Charities Board, which replaced the commission, in September 2012 during the run-up to the legalisation of same-sex marriage in April 2013.In fact, the Charities Board confirmed its decision to deregister Family First just two days before the gay marriage law was passed. The juxtaposition of events made it very clear that the family group’s public campaign to preserve traditional marriage was the deciding factor in the Board’s decision.Today’s decision from the Supreme Court allows an appeal by FFNZ against its deregistration, and orders the Charities Board to reconsider its move against the group. It follows a similar appeal won by Greenpeace NZ last August after the Charities Board ruled its purposes, like those of the family advocates, primarily “political” rather than “charitable”.However, a majority of the Supreme Court in the Greenpeace case ruled that an organisation with charitable purposes could also have political purposes, depending on the objectives being advocated and the means used to promote those objectives.Greenpeace and Family First make unusual bedfellows but taken together their appeals amount to a breakthrough for many charitable groups, as FFNZ national director Bob McCoskrie pointed out:“This decision is a victory for the many charitable groups – both registered, deregistered and wanting to be registered – who advocate for their causes, beliefs, and supporters and often have to engage in political activity, not always through choice but through necessity. It is a victory for open robust debate on issues that affect families.”(Among the currently registered are groups that opposed FFNZ during the gay marriage debate – without incurring the displeasure of the Charities Board.)In his decision Justice Collins said that the Charities Board should take into account the Greenpeace ruling – and his own – when deciding FFNZ’s status, and should not be influenced by whether or not board members actually like the family group’s views (as, clearly, they do not):[87] In this respect, I believe there is force to the submissions of Mr McKenzie QC, counsel for Family First. He argued that Family First’s purposes of advocating its conception of the traditional family is analogous to organisations that have advocated for the “mental and moral improvement” of society.[88] In recognising the strength of Mr McKenzie’s submission, I am not suggesting the Charities Board must accept Family First’s purposes are for the benefit of the public when it reconsiders Family First’s case.I am saying, however, that the analogical analysis which the Charities Board must undertake should be informed by examining whether Family First’s activities are objectively directed at promoting the moral improvement of society. This exercise should not be conflated with a subjective assessment of the merits of Family First’s views. Members of the Charities Board may personally disagree with the views of Family First, but at the same time recognise there is a legitimate analogy between its role and those organisations that have been recognised as charities. Such an approach would be consistent with the obligation on members of the Charities Board to act with honesty, integrity and in good faith.45The refusal of the Charities Board to review their decision against Family First straight after the Greenpeace case seems to indicate something other than good faith.“It is disappointing that it took a Judge to remind the Charities Board to recognise the precedent set in the Greenpeace case. When the Greenpeace case was decided, we asked the Charities Board to reconsider their decision to deregister us, but they refused to. This has cost both Family First and the taxpayer thousands of dollars in legal fees,” says Mr McCoskrie.“When a group who promotes the natural family as a fundamental social unit is deemed of ‘no public benefit’, you know a country is in deep trouble. The original decision to deregister Family First during the recent marriage debate was a highly politicised one.” http://www.mercatornet.com/conjugality/view/family-advocacy-can-be-political-and-charitable-rules-new-zealand-jud/16438last_img read more

Will Killing the Iran Deal Destroy the Iran-India Economic Honeymoon

first_imgU.S. President Donald Trump has called for new sanctions against Iran and proposed decertification of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), popularly known as the Iran Deal.Trump has given the European signatories to the agreement, most importantly Britain, Germany and France, an ultimatum to fix the flaws in the Iran deal or forget about the United States’ continued investment in the agreement, which according to Trump, was Obama’s deal and one of the most disastrous and one-sided accords the U.S. has ever entered into.Read it at IPD Related Itemslast_img read more

Using LinkedIn for Recruitingand Influence Marketing

first_imgMost likely you probably use LinkedIn as a part of your recruiting strategy whether you are posting jobs or proactively looking for candidates. But are you using LinkedIn as an effective channel for your influence marketing strategy?LinkedIn currently boasts having over 60 million registered users. That is a pretty large number. Here are a few ideas to capitalize on your LinkedIn presence with your company’s influence marketing strategy in mind:Conduct advanced searches with different keywords to identify potential key influencers and industry experts. Check out an older post for more ideas on identifying your influencers.There are a few consulting firms that can help you find your target influencers as well. If you have embraced the influence marketing strategy to the fullest extent, check out Influence50.Use LinkedIn as a social networking tool to begin building relationships with your influencers by sharing relevant content.Identify groups on LinkedIn that apply directly to your space and join the conversation.For example, if your company sells technology into the higher education space, investigate the EDUCAUSE and Higher Education Management groups.Remember to always use LinkedIn groups to show your thought leadership, rather than provide your 30-second elevator pitch.If a group does not exist, create one and invite industry leaders to participate in the discussion. The point it to add value here, not sell software. Be sure that you are able to supply educational content, moderate discussions, and encourage participation to ensure your group is a success.If you are interested in learning more about LinkedIn and recruiting, please visit my colleague Diana Wining’s blog for more insights on how OpenView Venture Partners provides recruiting support to our expansion stage portfolio companies. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to PrintPrintShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more