They are ‘ex-citizens’: Jokowi disowns overseas Indonesian IS supporters

first_imgTopics : “Once the data is completed and put into an immigration database, we can ban them from entering [the country],” he went on to say, adding that the IS sympathizers “are ex-citizens”.Citing data from the United States’ Central Intelligence Agency, Coordinating Political, Legal and Security Affairs Minister Mahfud MD previously said that some 689 Indonesians had been identified as IS sympathizers in Syria and Turkey, as well as other countries.Read also: BREAKING: Indonesia not repatriating IS fighters to protect nation from ‘terrorist virus’According to the data, some 228 people still hold identification as Indonesian citizens while others do not have proper documents to prove their citizenship. Indonesian authorities have previously suggested that most of the Indonesian IS supporters are women and children. Editor’s note: The number of identified Indonesian IS supporters has been corrected from 698 to 689. We apologize for the mistake. President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo has decided to ban Indonesian nationals who joined the Islamic State (IS) movement in Syria from returning to Indonesia, calling them “ex-citizens”, as he instructed his aides to immediately sort out their identities and put them on the immigration database. The move followed the government’s decision not to repatriate some 689 Indonesian IS supporters currently stranded abroad, with the government saying that it would prioritize the safety of the hundreds of millions of citizens at home.“During the Cabinet meeting [on Tuesday], I gave an order to identify each of the 689 people, including their names and where they came from,” Jokowi told reporters on Wednesday. When asked about the IS sympathizers’ fate, now that Indonesia had decided against their return, Jokowi said that joining IS “was their own decision” and that “they would have calculated” the risks from doing so. “We will still provide opportunities for orphans [to return home], those who are children under 10 years old,” Jokowi said, “But so far we still don’t know if there are any.”Prior to Tuesday’s Cabinet meeting, Jokowi had voiced his personal disapproval of the idea of repatriating Indonesian IS supporters, although he added that the decision would be made after hearing from relevant ministries.Mahfud also conveyed a personal view similar to Jokowi’s, saying that repatriating IS fighters could pose a danger to the country.last_img read more

Switzerland’s CHF7bn intergenerational pension problem

first_imgLucerne, SwitzerlandMeanwhile, a joint study by researchers from Lucerne University’s Institute of Financial Services and the University of Basel’s Faculty of Economic Sciences confirmed the problem of cross-financing in the second pillar.“Today’s focus on secure pensions at a high level and the short-term obligations for interest rates and funding levels connected to it, which no longer match market environments, have to be questioned,” authors Yvonne Seiler Zimmermann and Heinz Zimmermann wrote.They emphasised that Pensionskassen “have to be able to invest in risky assets over the long term” to achieve higher returns.A second paper, by Swiss consultancy C-alm, also highlighted the potential of the second pillar but warned about too much flexibility for members, such as providing a free choice of Pensionskasse for individuals, which has been frequently discussed.The researchers argued that such “measures for liberalisation are breaking with the concept of an intergenerational risk pool”.They said this “would undermine a risk compensation and with it the possibility to take investment risks”.C-alm pointed out that risk taking and risk compensation needed an “appropriate level of collectivity and long-term perspective”.Both studies (in German) can be downloaded from the Asip, the Swiss pensions trade body.See the June edition of IPE for a country report focused on Switzerland. Pension promises made in the past cannot be adjusted under Swiss law, meaning older pensioners’ benefits are calculated using a higher Umwandlungssatz, or conversion rate. This rate determines how much of an individual’s total accrued pension they can receive every year.Newer pensioners receive considerably lower pensions from the second pillar and active members’ assets have to be used to fulfil all these promises.“Overall it can be noted that the systemic risks in the second pillar continue to increase with the changes in the economic, financial and demographic environments,” Pierre Triponez, president of the OAK, noted in his foreword to the supervisor’s annual report.He said there was need for action from the authorities on new legislation, especially after the pension reform package Altersvorsorge 2020 failed to get public approval last year in a national referendum.In its analysis of the financial situation of Swiss Pensionskassen, the OAK also noted that the long-term minimum interest rate granted stood at 2.75% – down from 2.97% in 2016. The technische Zins – the return assumed when calculating contributions – was lower at around 2.25% on average.The OAK expected more Pensionskassen to make adjustments to their parameters.Studies back up regulator’s fear Switzerland’s second-pillar pension funds are being forced to use assets accrued by people still working to pay current retirees’ pensions, according to the country’s pension regulator.“Systemic risks in the second pillar continue to increase with changes in the economic, financial and demographic environments”Pierre Triponez, president, OAKAround CHF7bn (€5.9bn) a year – roughly 1% of the total capital in the Swiss second pillar – must be taken from active members’ assets to pay for current benefits in Swiss Pensionskassen, the Oberaufsichtskommission (OAK) said in its 2017 report.“This annual reallocation has reached critical levels,” the OAK warned.last_img read more

Alan Lee Hess Jr. June 17, 1953 – May 27, 2020

first_imgAlan Lee Hess Jr. age 66 of Bright, Indiana passed away in his home Tuesday, May 27, 2020. Born June 17, 1953, in Chicago, Illinois the son of Alan and Martha (Zawadzki) Hess Sr.Alan, a graduate of Farmington High School in Farmington, Michigan, attended Michigan Institute of Technology and married Kathy Jo Westrich November 26, 1976 at Bright Methodist Church in Bright, Indiana. He is a member of Dearborn Hills United Methodist Church in Bright, Indiana. Alan worked as a computer machinist for the aircraft industry. He enjoyed car shows and photography.Alan is survived by his wife, Kathy Jo Hess, his children Marsha (Joe) Schmeltzer and Brad (Rebecca) Hess. Grandfather of Grayson Schmeltzer, Daisy Hess and Otto Schmeltzer. Brother of Debra Hess. Survived by his sisters-in-law Vella Kay (Wayne) Reiman, Donna Westrich, brothers-in-law Ken (Sandy) Westrich, Mark (Nancy) Westrich, Dave Hartman. Also survived by his Auntie’s Frances and Cele along with many loving nieces and nephews.Alan is preceded in death by his parents Alan and Martha Hess Sr. and his brother in law Mike Westrich and sister-in-law Pam Hartman.Visitation will be held on Thursday, June 4, 2020 from 10:00 A.M. until time of memorial service at 12:00 P. M. at Dearborn Hills United Methodist Church 25365 State Line Rd. Lawrenceburg, Indiana.Memorials may be donated to Bright Fire department and/or Dearborn Hills United Methodist Church c/o the funeral Home Jackman Hensley Funeral Home 215 Broadway St. Harrison, Ohio 45030.last_img read more

Massive Fire Damages, Destroys 3,500 Rental Cars in SW Florida

first_imgMore than 3,500 rental cars were damaged or destroyed in a fire that burned across 15 acres near a Florida airport before being contained late Friday night.The cars were in a grassy area that is used as an overflow lot by car rental companies servicing Southwest Florida International Airport.Witnesses said they heard multiple small explosions and flames. Another 3,850 vehicles were undamaged, according to airport spokeswoman Vicki Moreland.Multiple law enforcement agencies in Southwest Florida assisted in controlling the fire and managing roads.Investigators are still trying to determine the cause of the fire.last_img read more

Transfer forward making most of new surroundings

first_imgJunior Michala Johnson has finally made her long anticipated step back into the limelight. After sitting out last season in accordance with NCAA transfer bylaws, the 6-foot-3 forward has dreams of achieving goals that seemed impossible just two years ago.Johnson’s journey to Madison ironically began in the spotlight.Coming out of Bellwood, Ill., and the perennial powerhouse Montini Catholic High School, she was ranked the No. 46 recruit in the nation and seventh at the power forward position. Head coach Bobbie Kelsey had the chance to scout and recruit Johnson while she was an assistant coach at Stanford University. Kelsey said Johnson was dominant at the high-school level, where the phenom averaged 16.9 points, 10.5 rebounds, and four blocks per game.Johnson was so coveted by college coaches that the dynastic University of Connecticut head coach Geno Auriemma offered her a scholarship. Johnson packed her bags and headed to Storrs, Conn., to begin her college basketball career for the No. 1 team in the nation. Johnson was attracted to the publicity that came with being a part of the Huskies and felt that she could be a big-time player at the nation’s top program.“Sometimes kids get caught up in the hype,” Kelsey said, reflecting on what might have been going through her head.It was there she won a national championship to cap off her freshmen season against Kelsey’s Stanford squad. It was also there Johnson realized she did not fit in with the program was not maximizing her potential as a basketball player. She only played 288 total minutes in two seasons at UCONN, 161 in 2010-2011 and just 127 in 2011-2012.Midway through her sophomore season, Johnson decided that she would transfer and pursue her basketball career at a different institution of higher learning.Johnson targeted her search to almost all Big Ten schools, notably Michigan State, Michigan, Illinois and Northwestern. In the end Wisconsin won out, primarily because of her familiarity with Kelsey, the proximity to home and the prospects of earning a ton of court time.Johnson describes her transfer season as frustrating and trying, yet beneficial. While she was upset that she could not play in the games, she says she learned about Kelsey’s system in practice and the way the coaches operated. Johnson shifted to a mental focus and became a student of the game by scouting Big Ten teams and other prominent opponents from the bench.Something that made the transfer process bearable for Johnson was having fifth-year senior point guard Taylor Wurtz with her on the bench that season. Wurtz grabbed a medical redshirt five games into last season after suffering a season-ending back injury. Wurtz said that both players helped each other get through the difficult time by keeping their sights set on the next season.“During the last preseason I always joked, ‘Wow, Michala, I would love to play with you,’” Wurtz said. “When it actually happened, I was really happy I could play with her because she is a special player.”Now that Johnson has the spotlight, she has shown minimal interest in relinquishing it. Johnson put her season of practice to work for the first time on October 10 in the season opener. After an explosive first half against Drake, she finished with 18 points and 16 rebounds, both career highs. The following game she scored 21 points, shooting 10-17 from the field against UW-Milwaukee.“Everybody else said they couldn’t tell, but I was extremely nervous and excited at the same time,” Johnson said of the first time she pulled her No. 25 jersey over her head. “We worked on a lot of stuff in practice, and I just went with the flow of the game.”Johnson serves as an enforcer in the middle for UW. She adds a completely different aspect to the offensive game plan, and Kelsey has every intention of her touching the ball on each possession. Kelsey also praised Johnson’s work ethic during her season of ineligibility because she was aware she would have to step into a starting role eventually.“She brings a lot of scoring power. She brings a lot of rebounding ability,” Kelsey said. “She has a nice shot up top and foot-fake to get to the basket, and she can finish with both hands. We’re happy to have her because we have that outside punch but you need to have that inside force.”Johnson wants to improve on her rebounding game and considers it a point of emphasis for her improvement. Kelsey has set a goal for Johnson for the upcoming season, that she should get a double-double every game. Coach knows that this is a lofty task, but that Johnson is one of the few players in the nation capable of attaining this goal.Affectionately known as “Mick” by her teammates and coaches, Johnson still has two years of eligibility remaining, which is great news for Badgers fans. After many trials and tribulations, Michala finally has her spotlight back. Badger nation will most definitely not mind if she stays there for a while.last_img read more