The War at Home – PART II

first_img Dani Ticktin Koplik, founder of dtkResources, a professional training and coaching firm, believes that for veterans’ outcomes in the job market to change, they should strive to understand the context and needs of the civilian workplace. He also said it’s important for veterans to avoid using military jargon, citing O*NET Online as a good resource to help veterans convert their military skill sets into civilian terminology. There are numerous resources available to military veterans searching for employment. Here are a few: “They often have the attitude that they are owed a job, and are under the impression that their skill set is more valuable than their civilian counterparts,” Graves said. “They have to understand that you can’t take a CEO of an organization, put stars on their shoulder, and expect them to be a successful general. Just like they can’t take their rank and walk in to the top of the chain of command in a civilian organization.” Feds Hire Vets: This veteran employment website was created as a direct result of the Executive Order signed by President Barack Obama regarding the employment of veterans in the federal government. The site includes information for veteran job seekers, transitioning service members, and veterans’ family members. By Dialogo April 03, 2013 Veterans Green Jobs: Founded in 2008, this organization connects military veterans with training and employment opportunities in the green sector. Any military veteran who served 180 days or more and was discharged under honorable conditions is eligible for the programs they offer. Career Resources for Veterans “In the civilian workplace, competence is assumed and progression through the ranks is often a function of personal relationships, of visibility, and of the softer skills such as displaying emotional intelligence, being able to communicate and build rapport, and establishing trust.” Sara Sutton Fell, founder of FlexJobs, a professional job finding service, suggested that veterans market their supervisory experience to employers. “It is all dependent on the career field of the member, but many gain extensive professional certifications that can translate into the civilian sector. Some such certifications are found in areas such as legal, hazardous materials, healthcare, engineering, transportation, accounting/finance, and information security.” “The reality of the civilian workplace – what it looks like, what it values, how it operates – is quite different from the military reality,” Koplik said. “Very simply, if vets want to secure employment, build a career, and succeed in the civilian sector, they have to accept what today’s business reality looks like. Business now is highly relational, collaborative, and interdependent which means that employers also look for candidates who ‘fit’ into their corporate culture, who understand and embody their corporate mission and buy into their corporate values.” Koplik said this is often foreign to vets who succeeded in a military culture based on merit, in which expectations for performance are well-articulated, clear, and consistent. Citroen said she encourages veterans to become active on LinkedIn and other networks, both in person and online. “Military personnel have extensive supervisory experience as they move up in rank. Not only do they perform as a supervisor and manager, often for numerous projects, programs, or units, but also as a mentor and professional development instructor,” she said. Interestingly enough, Graves, a Navy veteran, said that the largest obstacle for finding a job is often the veterans themselves. Wounded Warrior Careers Program: Offered through the National Organization on Disability (NOD), this program’s purpose is to help veterans with serious disabilities achieve meaningful, rewarding and sustainable careers in the civilian sector. Career specialists work with the veterans, providing support and guidance to help them identify and achieve their career goals. Fell also stressed the importance of certifications obtained while in the military. Daywalt stressed that there are more than 200 skill sets used in the military needed by civilian employers, with leadership being the main skill. VetJobs: Sponsored by the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW), VetJobs is a job board which allows employers to easily reach all members of the military community. VetJobs was established in 1999, and receives 20,000 visitors a day. A Sense of Entitlement Recent efforts by the National Guard have already proven effective in putting Minnesota’s military veterans in civilian jobs, as reported by Minnesota Public Radio. Acting proactively, a team of military officials accompanied government, education and business leaders to Kuwait where they spent a week on a military base and led troops through a rigorous set of exercises designed to help prepare them to job hunt. The exercises included sessions on resume writing and career planning and mock interviews. Of the more than 500 service members who returned from the Middle East without civilian jobs, guard officials said only 35 are still looking for work. Bonds of Courage: With a staff that includes veterans themselves, Bonds of Courage offers a variety of assistance to veteran job-seekers – from networking to preparation for answering difficult interview questions. Identifying and Leveraging Advantages “They should join community groups and business networks,” she said. “There are great jobs that are not advertised, and the traditional ‘say and spray’ model of shooting out resumes is not as powerful at helping recruiters find you.” last_img read more

Gold Coast beachside shack to go under the hammer after 46 years with one owner

first_imgRay White Broadbeach agent Troy Fitzgerald outside 20 Riviera Rd, Miami. Picture: Jerad WilliamsA GOLD Coast beachside shack, on the market after 46 years with one owner, is expected to fetch a seven-digit dollar figure at auction next month.The home is likely to attract plenty of buyer interest and a high sale price – given that it’s now almost impossible to find a house east of the Gold Coast Highway for less than a $1 million.Ray White Broadbeach marketing agent Troy Fitzgerald, who is taking the Miami property to auction on April 1, said the suburb was “a little bit understated”.“That pocket has got a lot of growth still,” he said. “It is the first of that type of property to be on the market in years, and it’s going to set a bit of a benchmark on other properties in the area.”The two-bedroom Miami shack hasn’t changed much. This was taken around 1971 when Gweneth and George Dean bought the property. Her children in the photo are now 50 and 52.Brisbane-based vendors Gweneth and George Dean bought the Miami property in 1971 for just $6500.“We had always holidayed in Burleigh Heads and we had another holiday house there,” 80-year-old Mrs Dean said.“During the 1971 Christmas break I happened to see a property in Riviera Rd, Miami, advertised for $6500 which I felt was worth investigating.” 20 Riviera Rd, Miami.More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North10 hours ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa1 day agoMrs Dean said the family used to visit Burleigh Heads fortnightly and were initially attracted to the vibe of the area.“Burleigh was always a very family orientated area,” she said.“It got to a stage where we looked upon ourselves as being half local. You knew every second person you’d meet along the street.”But she said the demographic had now changed with new developments and a younger crowd moving in.“It’s now probably more tourist orientated and there’s very few of the older residents left.” she said.20 Riviera Rd, Miami in the 1970s.Since they bought 20 Riviera Rd, the Deans have only painted the property.“The last (and current) tenancy contract was signed in 2000 and although there were occasional changes of individuals the present tenant has been there since 2004,” Ms Dean said.“We have never lost a week’s rent in that time.”Mrs Dean acknowledged the property might be snapped up by developers due to its medium-density zoning and proximity to the beach.“We assumed that might happen and that’s one of the reasons we didn’t do a lot of work on it,” she said.What else you could buy in 1971?23 inch TV, $20Vegemite 4oz, 22c (113 grams)Fridge, $39Lip stick, 69cAjax washing power 20oz, 39c (566g)1964 Holden Station Wagon, $1045 20 Riviera Rd, Miami.The 536sq m block, just 200m from the beach, included an old two-bedroom weatherboard house which was built in the 1930s.“We bought it purely as an investment as we used the Burleigh house whenever we were down,” Mrs Dean said.“The area was very quiet. The house was called ‘Tween Hills’ as it was directly ‘between the hills’ of North Burleigh and Miami/ Nobby.”Highly sought-after Riviera Rd is a mix of unit blocks and luxury homes including the highest-seller – a four-bedroom home at No. 13. Riviera connects the Gold Coast Highway with popular Marine Pde.last_img read more