University awards medal

first_imgKen Hackett, former president of Catholic Relief Services (CRS), will receive the 2012 Laetare Medal during the May 20 Commencement Ceremony, the University announced Sunday. The Medal, established at Notre Dame in 1883, is the oldest and most prestigious honor given to American Catholics. It is awarded annually to a Catholic “whose genius has ennobled the arts and sciences, illustrated the ideals of the Church and enriched the heritage of humanity,” according to a University press release. University President Fr. John Jenkins praised Hackett’s compassion and strong commitment to worldwide outreach throughout his tenure at CRS. “Ken Hackett has responded to a Gospel imperative with his entire career,” Jenkins said in the press release. “His direction of the Catholic Church’s outreach to the hungry, thirsty, naked, sick and unsheltered of the world has blended administrative acumen with genuine compassion in a unique and exemplary way.” After serving CRS in various capacities since 1972, including a stint as its regional director for Africa and in several posts throughout Africa and Asia, Hackett was appointed president of CRS in 1993, according to the press release. He held the position for 18 years until his retirement in December. Hackett was succeeded by Carolyn Woo, former dean of the Mendoza College of Business.  Hackett, a native of West Roxbury, Mass., became interested in international service when he enrolled in the Peace Corps following his graduation from Boston College in 1968 because he said “it seemed like an interesting thing to do.” Hackett’s experiences living in a Catholic mission and working in an agricultural cooperative project in rural Ghana demonstrated the “actual impact of American food aid on the health and well-being of very poor kids in a very isolated part of a West African country,” he said in the press release.  After completing his Peace Corps assignment, he continued his commitment to service by beginning his CRS career in Sierra Leone, where he administered both a maternal and child health program and a nationwide leprosy control program.  While serving as CRS regional director for Africa, Hackett addressed the agency’s response to the Ethiopian famine of 1984-85 and supervised CRS operations in East Africa during the Somalian crisis of the 1990s, according to the press release.  During his tenure as the agency’s sixth president, Hackett oversaw the redoubling of CRS efforts to engage the American Catholic community in worldwide service work by reaching out to Catholic organizations, dioceses, parishes, and colleges and universities throughout the country. CRS also incorporated lay people into its board of directors under Hackett’s supervision.  The organization, one of the world’s most effective and efficient in global relief and development, now operates in more than 100 countries with a staff of nearly 5,000, according to the press release.  In addition to his service as CRS president, Hackett also served as the North America president of Caritas Internationalis, the coalition of humanitarian agencies of the Catholic Church. He continues to serve as an adviser to the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops and as a board member of the Vatican Pontifical Commission Cor Unum. Hackett was awarded an honorary degree from Notre Dame in 2007. He also holds honorary degrees from Boston College, Cabrini College, University of Great Falls, College of Notre Dame of Maryland, Mount St. Mary’s University, New York Medical College, Siena College, University of San Diego, Santa Clara University, Villanova University and Walsh University. The Laetare Medal is named in celebration of Laetare Sunday, the fourth Sunday in Lent and the day Notre Dame announces its recipient each year. The 2011 Medal was jointly awarded to Sr. Joan McConnon and Sr. Mary Scullion, founders of Project H.O.M.E. Previous recipients include President John F. Kennedy, Catholic Worker founder Dorothy Day, Cardinal Joseph Bernardin and jazz composer Dave Brubeck.last_img read more

(Only 13) Doctors helping patients die as assisted death debate rolls on (by Stuff-ed)

first_imgDoctors helping patients die as assisted death debate rolls onStuff co.nz 13 July 2015More than one in ten doctors have helped a patient die despite potentially breaking the law, a survey suggests.In a fax poll of general practitioners, conducted by magazine New Zealand Doctor and IMS Health, nearly 12 per cent of respondents said they had helped a patient die. About two out of five doctors also said they had been asked to help a patient die, although most had refused.The poll, reported in New Zealand Doctor was based on the responses from 110 doctors, which means about 13 doctors admitted to helping a patient die.It comes after terminally ill Wellington lawyer Seales’ high-profile court battle to seek legal clarification for doctors, allowing them to help terminally ill patients die at a time of their choosing without risking prosecution. Seales died of a brain tumour on June 5, living long enough to be told the judge in the case, Justice David Collins, had decided it was still against the law for doctors to help their patients to die.But the issue remains strongly contested and the poll suggested the medical community also remains divided. Of those surveyed, 45.5 per cent believed the law needed to change to legally protect doctors who helped terminally ill patients die, compared to 44.5 per cent who did not.Some doctors responding to the survey said even if they weren’t helping patients die, pain relief could effectively have the same outcome.http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/70184652/Doctors-helping-patients-die-as-assisted-death-debate-rolls-onlast_img read more

Boys hoops Warriors fall in rematch with West Genesee

first_imgAnd they were tied, 58-58, when Amica made his biggest play of the night, a block on a Warriors breakaway to prevent Liverpool from going back in front with 1:30 to play.They exchanged free throws before Adam Dudzinski, with 30 seconds left, hit a driving layup to put WG front for good. Trying to answer, the Warriors instead turned it over when Jack Pento stepped on the baseline.Amica took it from there, hitting on five of six free throws in the waning seconds to give him 22 points for the night as eight of Dudzinski’s 13 points came in the fourth quarter, John Benson adding 11 points.Aside from Young, three other Warriors reached double figures, Kyle Caves getting 13 points as Jacob Works had 12 points and Romeo Clarke had 11 points.Before all this, Cicero-North Syracuse, after yet another close call in a defeat to Baldwinsville Jan. 17, rebounded a day later to defeat Rochester’s Edison Tech 64-59.Dominating the first half, the Northstars led 36-16, and then held on behind Luke Paragon’s career-best 32 points. Tavores Flournory earned eight points, with Jerrod Hills adding seven points.But C-NS lost 64-48 to Bishop Ludden last Monday night, unable to recover from a first half where the Gaelic Knights steadily built a 38-22 advantage.Paragon, despite 11 rebounds, was held to just two points. Kevin Felasco led with 15 points, while Hills had 11 points. Brian Bonin and Grant Sennett had nine points apiece as Grant Baker (18 points) and Mykell Kaigler (15 points) set the pace for Ludden.Then, on Friday night, C-NS fell 68-50 to Nottingham, outscored 38-21 following a close first half as Mazi Jackson had 20 points for the Bulldogs, just ahead of Jaden Ezomo’s 19 points and Marlen Peters’ 16 points.Paragon and Bonin both finished with 14 points, but no one else on the Northstars hit double figures, Sennett and Joe Penizotto each gaining seven points.Among this week’s action is a second head-to-head meeting between C-NS and Liverpool, nearly two months after the Warriors won the first encounter in the Peppino’s Invitational at OCC.Share this:FacebookTwitterLinkedInRedditComment on this Story Again, it matched up the last two state Class AA champions. Liverpool had won 66-53 back in that initial meeting, but was in catch-up mode through most of the rematch.Sparked by six straight points from Will Amica, WG went on an 8-0 run to close the first quarter, and maintained that lead through a foul-filled first half, only to have Liverpool storm back and go in front 40-38 late in the third period before Anthony Dattellas hit six straight points to return the lead to the Wildcats.After that, no one could get away. Josh Young, with a career-high 22 points, paced a Warriors team that stayed in front for most of the fourth quarter yet never by more than a basket. Now that it had finally broken its mid-season six-game skid by completing a regular-season sweep of Corcoran, the Liverpool boys basketball team wanted to do the same to the reigning state champions.Doing so would mean trying to upend West Genesee’s six-game win streak in last Saturday night’s Pathfinder Bank Classic on the same Allyn Hall floor at Onondaga Community College where it beat the Wildcats on Dec. 10.Liverpool nearly did so, the game swinging back and forth until the final seconds when WG’s strong free-throw shooting proved a difference-maker, the Warriors taking a 67-62 defeat.center_img Tags: boys basketballC-NSliverpoollast_img read more