Yemen crisis deepens as separatists declare self-governance

first_imgYemen’s separatists signed a power-sharing deal in Riyadh last November that quelled a battle — dubbed a “civil war within a civil war” — for the south that had in August seen them seize control of the second city of Aden.The Riyadh pact quickly became defunct, failing to meet deadlines for key measures including the formation of a new cabinet with equal representation for southerners, and the reorganisation of military forces. The STC announced in its statement that it was declaring “self-governance in the south starting midnight on Saturday April 25th, 2020.”A self governing committee will start its work according to a list of tasks assigned by the council’s presidency,” it said. Aden residents reported heavy deployments of STC forces in the city and a separatist source told AFP they had set up checkpoints “at all government facilities, including the central bank and port of Aden”.Military vehicles drove through the city with STC flags flying aloft.The political landscape in the south is complex, and despite the STC’s declaration some southern cities said they did not recognise the call to self-rule and would remain aligned with the central government.Yemen’s Foreign Minister Mohammad al-Hadhrami said the STC move was “a continuation of the armed rebellion last August and a declaration of rejection” of the Riyadh agreement.Tens of thousands of civilians have been killed over the past five years in the war between the government and the Huthi rebels.Earlier this month, Yemen reported its first case of coronavirus in Hadramawt, a southern government-controlled province, raising fears of an outbreak.Compounding the country’s troubles, at least 21 people were killed in flash flooding this month, with Aden’s streets submerged and homes destroyed.The UAE, like the STC, has a zero tolerance policy towards the Muslim Brotherhood and Yemen’s Brotherhood-influenced Al-Islah party, which has representatives in the internationally recognised government.Last August, deadly clashes broke out between the government and STC forces who seized control of Aden, ousting unionist forces who had set up base there when President Abedrabbo Mansour Hadi fled the Huthi-held capital Sanaa in February 2015.The tussle for control of the south  exposed divisions between the coalition partners — Saudi Arabia, which backs the government, and the United Arab Emirates, a backer and funder of the STC.The Riyadh agreement had been welcomed as preventing the complete break-up of Yemen, and hailed as a possible stepping stone towards ending the wider conflict in Yemen.But the cracks soon emerged, with complaints over food shortages in the south, a sharp depreciation of the currency, and a lack of funds to pay public sector employees. The STC’s statement Sunday said there had been a marked deterioration of public services, which “was clearly reflected in the latest torrential rains that caused the people in Aden deep suffering”.The government was using its powers as “a weapon to bring the southerners to kneel,” it said.While the government and the STC are technically allies in the long war against the Huthis, the secessionists believe the south should be an independent state — as it was before unification in 1990.Topics : The Southern Transitional Council (STC) accused the government of failing to perform its duties and of “conspiring” against the southern cause, and said self-governance had begun at midnight. The government condemned the move and said the separatists — who have long agitated for independence in the south — would be responsible for the “catastrophic and dangerous” outcome.The breakdown between the one-time allies comes as a Saudi-led coalition, which backs the internationally recognised government in a battle against the Iran-backed Huthi rebels, has extended a unilateral ceasefire aimed at fending off the coronavirus pandemic — a move rejected by the Huthis.last_img read more

GSA Eagle runners win Seacoast Invitational

first_img Latest Posts In the boys’ race, Hassett led the way with a time of 15 minutes and 2 seconds as the Eagles placed five runners among the top 10 finishers.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textJunior Devlin Valle was second in 16:13, junior Oliver Broughton was sixth in 16:34, senior Tate Yoder was eighth in 16:56 and sophomore Tyler Ray was ninth in 17:25, senior Michael Salois was 12th and junior Frank Schweizer was 13th, both in 17:44, as the Eagle boys finished with 20 points.Following in the team competition were Lee Academy with a score of 65, Washington Academy 79, Machias 87 and Searsport 114.In individual boys’ competition:For the Bucksport Golden Bucks, Skyler Fraga was fourth in 16:17, Ramon Perez was 15th in 17:55, Amaziah Jones was 22nd in 18:17 and Taylor Soteres was 25th in 18:55.For the Sumner Tigers, Dylan Bernaquer was 33rd in 20:01, Nicholas Kimball was 34th in 20:03 and Christian Kimball was 45th in 21:10.In the girls’ race, GSA’s Broughton was first in 18:28 and junior teammate Hanna Gutow was second in 18:46 as six Eagle runners placed among the top 10.Behind them, freshman Zeya Lorio was fifth in 19:20, freshman Mary Richardson was sixth in 19:22, sophomore Bella Cimeno was seventh in 19:30, senior Cedar Slagle was 10th in 19:48 and sophomore Emma Larson-Whittaker was 11th in 19:52.The Eagle girls finished with 18 points, followed by Lee Academy 61, Machias 73, Washington Academy 111 and Narraguagus 114.In the individual girls’ competition:For Bucksport, Natalie Coleman was fourth in 19:14, Natasha Clement was ninth in 19:45, Ansley Bernier was 46th in 27:17 and Mavis Tuanatu’a was 49th in 28:13.For Sumner, Brittany Pomeroy was 30th in 24:10 and Cassidy Lee was 39th in 26:03.——At Saturday’s Old Town Sectional Invitational, the Mount Desert Island Trojans put four runners among the top seven in winning the boys’ varsity competition with 52 points.Peter Philbrook placed fourth for MDI in 17:35.20, Ralph Magnani was fifth in 17:38.6, Jordan Harris was sixth in 17:39.09 and Ethan Craigo was seventh in 17:51.62.Rounding things out for MDI were David Anderson, 31st in 19:09.36; Josh Bloom, 46th in 19:44.97; and Matt Hanna, 58th in 20:33.27.Behind the Trojans in the team competition were Orono 61, Caribou 64, Old Town 116, Central 140, John Bapst 154, Foxcroft Academy 155, Presque Isle 188, Hermon 230 and Ellsworth 273.For the Eagles, Derek Look was 52nd in 20:05.61, Noah Robidoux was 60th in 20:44.81, Austin Baron was 64th in 21:31.63, Matt Frost was 65th in 21:31.80, Conrad Svec was 69th in 22:24.09, Tim Curts was 76th in 25:42.58 and Collin Lima was 78th in 25:48.79.In the girls’ competition, Orono took top honors with 35 points, followed by MDI 62, Caribou 100, John Bapst 112, Mattanawcook Academy 145, Ellsworth 165, Presque Isle 167, Washburn 180, Old Town 191 and Hermon 254.For the Trojans, Waylon Henggeler was runner-up in 19:27.70, Caroline Driscoll was seventh in 20:07.54, Lydia Dacorte was eighth in 20:18.59, India Janes was 16th in 21:40.66, Xingtyao Chen was 30th in 23:10.75, Erin White was 34th in 23:16.96 and Anita Wray was 44th in 24:28.71.For Ellsworth, Hayley Lawrence was fourth in 19:31.33, Olivia Lounder was 24th in 22:47.96, Katelynn Bagley was 33rd in 23:16.01, Julia Zavaleta was 51st in 24:34.41, Emine Mutlu was 63rd in 28:35.64 and Bailey Neale was 68th in 31:07.14. Like he did in the ’60s, Noel Paul Stookey sings out in troubling times – December 27, 2017 GSA surges in 4th to win Northern Maine title – February 26, 2017 Is this the kind of government we deserve? – July 10, 2017 SULLIVAN — Sophomore John Hassett and freshman Eliza Broughton led the George Stevens Academy Eagles to victory in boys’ and girls’ varsity competition at Friday’s annual Seacoast Invitational at Sumner Memorial High School. Latest posts by Hugh Bowden (see all) Bio Hugh BowdenExecutive EditorHugh writes editorials, covers Hancock County sports and helps out where needed in The American’s editorial department. When he’s not on the sidelines, he enjoys playing jazz and tennis. hbowden@ellsworthamerican.comlast_img read more