Hrvatska bi mogla hraniti 25 milijuna ljudi, ali uvozimo čak i vodu, maslinovo ulje, sol…

first_imgAccording to expert estimates, Croatia, given the climatic and geographical benefits, can produce enough food for 25 million people.Unatoč tome, godišnje uveze vrijednosti od dvije milijarde dolara prehrambenih proizvoda. Svima je jasno da moramo uvoziti banane i tropsko voće, ali u Hrvatsku se uvozi svinjsko meso i jaja koja se i kod nas mogu proizvesti bez poteškoća. Domaće solane proizvode sol, ali Hrvatska godišnje uveze i do 100 tisuća tona soli iz Tunisa, Alžira, Egipta i Maroka.U prva četiri mjeseca u Hrvatsku je uvezeno kruha i peciva u iznosu od 33 milijuna eura i to iz Italije, Njemačke, Poljske, Francuske, te čokolade vrijednosti 41 milijun eura. Mlijeka, sira i vrhnja, tko zna kakve kvalitete, uvezli smo oko 47 milijuna eura, dok domaće farme propadaju. Apsurdno je da uvozimo i vodu, mineralnu i gaziranu, i to gotovo 35 tisuća tona, što preračunato iznosi oko 18 milijuna eura. Uvoznog ulja od suncokreta i pamuka u Hrvatskoj je prodano u vrijednosti od 10,5 milijuna eura, biljaka, reznica i cijepova uvezli smo od dvanaest tisuća tona za 11,3 milijuna eura.Osim toga godišnje uvezemo i 1,5 milijuna litara maslinova ulja iz Italije, Španjolske i Belgije. Med, najčešće patvoreni, zapravo je riječ o fruktoznom sirupu, dolazi iz Turske, jabuke su slovenske, poljske i mađarske, češnjak je iz Kine. Kada na policama trgovačkih centara vidimo uredno posloženo voće i povrće koje mami kupce, rijetki će pročitati deklaraciju na kojoj piše država proizvodnje. Kupce uglavnom nije briga otkuda dolazi i tko je proizveo krumpir, jabuke, tikvice, rajčice, kupus, cvjetaču, karfiol.Slično je i s mesom i prerađevinama od mesa, bilo da je riječ o govedini, junetini, teletini, mlijeku, siru i drugim mliječnim prerađevinama. Za prosječnoga hrvatskoga građanina, nažalost, važna je samo niža cijena. O kvaliteti nitko ne govori. Tako se afere oko neispravne hrane redaju jedna za drugom. Kontaminirana jaja insekticidima iz Nizozemske, piletina zaražena salmonelom, jestivo ulje s kancerogenim tvarima, mlijeko s alfatoksinima, poljska čokolada zaražena salmonelom, keks s akrilamidom, škampi kontaminirani sulfitom, teški metali u talijanskim sirevima.Unfortunately, such products are withdrawn from the market when some of them have already been consumed, despite the controls carried out, both at EU level and in Croatia.Source / Author: Stanislav Soldo, Maslina


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Switzerland’s Publica names new director

first_imgPublica, Switzerland’s largest pension fund, has appointed Doris Bianchi as its new director, effective 1 November. She succeeds Dieter Stohler, who will leave the scheme on 30 September.Bianchi, who holds a doctorate in law, is currently personal adviser to Alain Berset, head of the Federal Department of Home Affairs (FDHA). The department oversees mainly OASI (state pension) and health services matters.In her current role, Bianchi supports the head of the FDHA especially on issues relating to health policy and statistics.Prior to joining the Home Affairs Department, Bianchi was the executive secretary of the Swiss Trade Union Federation (SGB), where she was responsible for social security issues since 2011. She is an expert in the Swiss second pillar pension system, the occupational pensions, or zweite Säule. She chaired the board of the replacement occupational pension scheme Stiftung Auffangeinrichtung BVG, or Fondation Institution Suppletive LPP , and the security fund.The Kassenkommission, the highest institution at Publica with supervisory authority over the management team, is convinced that Bianchi is the right pick for the success of the pension fund, it said in a statement.Publica is an independent pension institution operating under public-law fund managing the assets of 20 Swiss public pension schemes – 13 of which are open and seven closed – which comes close to CHF41bn (€38bn) as of December 31, 2019. IIn a previous interview with IPE, the head of asset management at Publica, Stefan Beiner, said the fund was working on three timeframes depicting different scenarios to navigate the COVID-19 crisis.Looking for IPE’s latest magazine? Read the digital edition here.last_img read more

Liverpool announce friendly

first_imgLiverpool have announced the addition of a friendly against Norwegian side Valerenga to their pre-season programme. The Reds will travel to Oslo for the fixture on August 7. Liverpool are already playing in Indonesia, Australia and Thailand on their pre-season tour in July and also hosting Olympiacos for Steven Gerrard’s testimonial at Anfield on August 3. Press Associationlast_img read more

USC students embrace relocated Syrian refugees

first_imgWhen Lida Dianti turned on the news and saw Syrian children losing their homes, their families and their very lives, she wanted to help in a sustainable way. Her purpose became to give young Syrians something that could never be taken away from them: education.Dianti founded the USC chapter of Students Organize for Syria in Fall 2016. The organization tutors students in English as part of their Students Teach for Syria program and co-hosts donation drives with UCLA to support families in El Cajon, a city near San Diego. The Syrian Civil War is currently in its sixth year, and millions have been displaced from their homes. Three years ago, the United Nations called the Syrian Civil War “the biggest humanitarian crisis of our era.” Because of the prevalence of information about the war, Dianti is adamant that the purpose of her club is not to raise awareness. “People know,” she said. “It’s 2017; we all have iPhones. People are well aware of what’s going on. I’m done having dialogue. I’m done raising awareness. I want action.”Action is an understatement for Dianti’s role in the club. She spends all her free time on SOS, whether she’s picking up lunch ingredients for the kids, brainstorming ideas for new projects or driving down to El Cajon to help out — a trip she makes every weekend. The dozen or so families she works with in El Cajon know and expect her; they have her number, they know her name and they know her car.The focus of Dianti’s club is education as she believes it is crucial for refugee children to continue their studies. As a senior majoring in international relations, she had been closely following the conflict. Over a year ago, she began tutoring a Syrian student, someone she still considers a very close friend. After meeting her, Dianti had a personal stake in the war.“She changed my whole life,” Dianti said. Dianti wanted to start a tutoring program here on campus because of the high demand for English speaking tutors. In her experience, there are a variety of reasons Syrian children want English tutors. Primarily, students want to be prepared for placement exams so they can get into universities and make a life for themselves outside of their unstable country. Students also need English assistance to fill out applications for jobs, for asylum and for colleges. A third group simply wants to practice their speaking. “[When studying a foreign language], it’s very common that reading and writing is easy, but speaking, that can only come from experience and practice,” Dianti said. “The best way to do that is with a native speaker.”Sofia Deak, vice president of SOS, first got involved as a tutor. “I had been looking for a way to help out with the crisis going on in Syria and have a lasting impact on the people who were suffering there,” she said. Deak then helped expand SOS’ work to El Cajon and coordinated volunteers for their donation drives, and has had memorable interactions with refugees on each trip. Families invited her in for Arabic tea or coffee (which Dianti raves about), and one family even insisted Deak stay for dinner. Kids hugged and kissed her after receiving gifts, and one man cried of joy after the volunteers bought glasses for him after he was unable to fill his prescription.“He was grateful for something that we thought was small,” Deak said.Deak has been studying Arabic for two years, but knowledge of Arabic is by no means a requirement for tutors or volunteers, given the high demand. “My Arabic is so bad, but they just want to hang out with you,” Dianti said of her frequent trips to El Cajon. She visits nine to 15 families each week and has gotten to know each family well. On Jan. 6, she took a young boy to In-N-Out, and they were laughing and eating together despite the language barrier. She would try to speak Arabic, and he wouldn’t understand. The boy would speak English, and she would get confused, but they would both learn a little as they laughed a lot. “It’s genuinely fun,” she said. “It’s like hanging out with family. They need compassion. They need to be treated like human beings because that hasn’t happened to them in a very long time.”Dianti graduates this year, but she still has new plans for SOS in the works. Her latest is a program that allows USC students to improve their colloquial Arabic skills and allows refugees to earn some money. Students can study Arabic in school, but she feels that it’s focused on reading and writing formally, not conversing casually. Ideally, USC students could have Skype Arabic lessons from, for example, a Syrian mother with young children who can’t leave the house to work, and pay them $15 to $20 an hour. It’s essentially the inverse of the English tutoring program they have in place, but unlike the English program, there isn’t a huge demand for tutors. According to Dianti, the hardest part of working with refugees is making promises that are difficult to keep. She said the executive board has no shortage of passion and enthusiasm, but there is a shortage of volunteers, forcing the few dedicated members to overextend themselves and work long hours to ensure they don’t let the refugees down. And yet, they keep doing it, over and over.“It’s the best thing I’ve done with my life, honest to God,” she said. “They just want people to hang out with, they want to meet Americans, they want to practice English, they want to feel like they’re a part of the community.”last_img read more