Georgia Greenspace

first_imgThe GGP is a voluntary, noncompetitive, county-based program. It provides for awards of formula grants to eligible counties if they develop and implement plans to permanently protect at least 20 percent of the county’s geographic area as undeveloped green space that furthers one or more of the GGP goals.Any Georgia county can submit a greenspace program for approval if its population is at least 60,000 or its growth at least 800 people per year. A list of participating counties is on the GGP Web page (www.state.ga.us/dnr/greenspace).If your county has already qualified and applied for GGP funding, you can still get involved. There has to be a Greenspace committee. And while the membership varies, it usually includes interested citizens. All meetings should be open to the public, too.As the state’s population increases, so do the demands on our natural resources. We can’t assume there will always be good water quality. We must take steps to ensure it.Water quality and conservation are critical issues for everyone in Georgia. Active involvement of volunteers will be necessary to ensure sustainable growth and a high quality of life. Get involved, and enjoy improving your community. Protect water quality for rivers, streams and lakes.Protect against floods.Protect wetlands.Reduce erosion by protecting steep slopes, areas with erodible soils and stream banks.Protect riparian buffers and other areas such as marsh hammocks that serve as natural habitats and corridors for native plants and animals.Protect scenic views.Protect archaeological and historic resources.Provide for recreation in the form of boating, hiking, camping, fishing, hunting, running, jogging, biking, walking, skating, birding, riding horses, observing or photographing nature, picnicking or just playing.Connect existing or planned areas contributing to the goals. The Georgia Greenspace Program was created by the legislature in 2000. The state Department of Natural Resources adopted the Georgia Greenspace Administrative Rules on July 26, 2000.The final rules for the GGP help guide the DNR, Georgia Greenspace Commission and the counties, cities and towns eligible to take part in the program.This is a great program. It can help us make sure we retain enough green space to protect out natural resources. Of the nine goals of the program, five affect water quality.Greenspace as a single word is a new term. Mostly, it refers to permanently protected land and water, including farm and forested land, whose development rights have been severed from the property.The land must be in its undeveloped, natural state or developed only to the extent consistent, or restored to the extent needed, to meet one or more of the GGP goals to:last_img read more

Computer Law Committee joins Business Law Section

first_img September 1, 2001 Regular News Computer Law Committee joins Business Law Section Computer Law Committee joins Business Law Section The Computer Law Committee has relinquished its position as one of the Bar’s substantive law standing committees, but it hasn’t disappeared. The committee has become part of the Business Law Section and is now accepting members. “The Business Law Section had been courting us for a couple of years to come over and join them,” said Stephen Krulin, chair of the committee. And thanks to the hard work of people like Sam Lewis, the immediate past chair, and Jose Rojas, another former chair, the committee did just that. Prior to becoming an official committee of the Business Law Section, the committee was governed by Bar guidelines which limited the membership to 50 people and imposed a six-year term limit for members. Because the committee was created in the early 1980s, many of its more experienced members were forced to step aside, according to Krulin. The committee also was financially limited, which allowed it to conduct only one CLE offering per year. Krulin said this made it hard for members to present information about current trends in the ever-changing field of computer law. The committee has always been comprised of people who know a great deal about computers and computer law, and who are, for the most part, at the cutting edge of computer-related arbitration, litigation, and mediation, Krulin said. “We approached our CLE efforts as an opportunity to open this experience to the Bar in general. Now, with the section, we’ll be open to providing additional programs,” Krulin said. With the reorganization, the committee will have access to the section’s CLE funds. The committee may also accept as many members as they’d like, including those seasoned members who previously left the committee. “We’re very happy to have them join our section,” said Business Law Section Chair David Felman. “We’re going to invest some money to help them do whatever they want.” Krulin likened the committee’s previous situation to a large plant in a small pot. “The more that we bloomed, the tighter it got. We wanted to expand, and the only way left to us was to become a section, which became impossible,” he said. The Computer Law Committee had sought section status for several years, but a lack of sufficient funding hampered its progress. Many members of the Business Law Section represent technology companies, and some were among the early Computer Law Committee members, which makes for a good pairing, according to Felman. The committee leaders weren’t nearly as confident about the match early on in the process, though. “We’ve got people who teach computer law, who work for businesses, who work for Internet companies, who work in the criminal sector. There’s a wide variety of people who aren’t strictly business lawyers,” Krulin said. “We polled the old-time members, the former chairs, former vice chairs, and posed the question.” The majority of committee members agreed it was a good idea, and when it came down to the final vote, the committee was unanimous. The Computer Law Committee’s first meeting as part of the section commenced at the section’s retreat in Naples in late August. Plans to offer the committee’s experience and knowledge to benefit the legislature’s consideration of upcoming technology and privacy issues were presented.last_img read more

Prabhas starrer Saaho almost recovers its cost of production even before release

first_img Close Saaho almost recovers its cost of production even before release.PR HandoutPrabhas starrer Saaho is expected to wreak havoc at the box office as it will be released on August 30. However, it looks like the makers of the movie have already made huge moolah even before its release.According to reports, Saaho has already raked in hundreds of crores in the form of theatrical rights. As reported, the film’s theatrical rights have been sold at a whopping Rs 320 crore, including all the languages it is going to be released in. Having been made with a budget of Rs 350 crore, Saaho has apparently almost recovered its cost of production even before its release.Apart from the theatrical rights, the producers of Saaho are going to make more money from satellite and OTT platform rights, which are yet to be decided.Prabhas and Shraddha Kapoor’s Saaho has been one of the most awaited flicks, and post its trailer release, the hype has doubled. Directed by Sujeeth, the action thriller not only marks the Bollywood debut of Prabhas, it also brings the fresh pairing of him and Shraddha. Prabhas and Shraddha Kapoor in SaahoTwitterTrailer of the movie made it apparent that it will be high on action and VFX. Dialogues are also being appreciated. Apart from Prabhas and Shraddha, Saaho also features Jackie Shroff, Chunky Panday, Mandira Bedi, Neil Nitin Mukesh among others. It will be released in Hindi, Telugu, Malayalam and Tamil. Neil Nitin Mukesh set to turn producerlast_img read more