Hypatia Day commemorates women in science

first_imgWho says mathematics and science are exclusively male-dominated areas of study? Saturday at Saint Mary’s College, nearly 80 seventh and eighth-grade girls defied this stereotype as they participated in various science labs and math-oriented activities for Hypatia Day. Hypatia Day was first organized in 1991 by Sr. Miriam Patrick Cooney, professor emerita of mathematics. Hypatia Day is meant to provide a unique experience for young girls interested in careers in math and science, director of Media Relations Gwen O’Brien said. The event was an opportunity for middle school girls from seven local counties to visit Saint Mary’s and be engaged and mentored by math and science majors, O’Brien said. With the help of Saint Mary’s students and faculty from the math and science departments, students from the surrounding Michiana and Mishawaka area received an early taste of what it is like to be a science or math major, O’Brien said.Various classrooms around the campus were used to showcase the applications of math, engineering, science and other associated fields, O’Brien said.Hypatia Day is named for the first known female mathematician, Hypatia of Alexandria, who was the daughter of ancient Greek mathematician and philosopher Theon, she said. According to legend, Hypatia’s father taught her mathematics during a period in Greek history when young, female girls were excluded from education, O’Brien said. “Hypatia knew something these girls may be figuring out: Math and science are for girls too,” O’Brien said.Associate professor of mathematics and director of Hypatia Day Kristin Kuter said the visiting middle school students were treated to a special address by this year’s keynote speaker, Dr. Tracy Kijewski-Correa, who is an associate professor and chair of the Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences Department at Notre Dame. “[She] was very dynamic, down to earth, and inspirational,” Kuter said. “She focused on empowering the young women in the audience and encouraging them to continue to pursue an education in STEM, emphasizing its power.” The remainder of the day included panel discussions between participating faculty and the girls’ parents that stressed the importance of support for the girls, who participated in hands-on sessions with Saint Mary’s math and science majors, O’Brien said. A variety of activities were put on by the math and computer science clubs, which helped the girls decode encrypted messages and code in programming language.The chemistry club had the girls make “goo” and look at different colored flames produced by various substances, and the biology and engineering clubs integrated their fundamental elements into fun games, Kuter said. “The student participants seemed to enjoy the hands-on activities, and the parents were very grateful for the information we provided about the upcoming curricular choices that should be made for their daughter to continue on to college,” Kuter said.This is Kuter’s fifth year running the event since she inherited the task from her predecessor, professor Ewa Misiolek, Kuter said.“[It is important to] encourage young women, especially those that are transitioning from middle to high school, that they can do anything, including math or science,” Kuter said.Kuter believes it is all a matter of self-confidence and self-esteem in terms of encouraging girls interested in mathematics and the sciences to continue to strive for achievement, Kuter said.“Girls need to be encouraged to persevere. They need to be told they can do it,” she said. “The stereotype that girls cannot excel in math and science unfortunately still exists in society and we need to counteract those messages at every opportunity possible, before the student disengages.“Given the research, if these girls are not encouraged, they may not have the confidence to continue.”Kuter said this year’s event was a success, and she hopes next year’s Hypatia Day will include an added session for physics students. Tags: Hypatia Daylast_img read more

POGOs given three days to settle tax liabilities

first_img Domiguez said then that POGOs operating in the country have unpaid taxes that already amounted to P21.62 billion. The Chief Executive initially ordered POGOs to settle their liabilities in 24 hours but changed it to three days during his television interview on Friday night. “They are now ordered to register with the BIR (Bureau of Internal Revenue) and kumuha ng tag number,” Duterte said in an interview with the CNN Philippines. Philippine Offshore Gaming Operators was conceptualized to enable the government to capture a greater share of the growing, yet previously unregulated, online gaming pie. ABS-CBN NEWS “You better settle that utang or else gawin ko kayong pugo,” he added. “Huwag ninyong lokohin ang Pilipino kasi ang Pilipino hindi loko-loko.”center_img Upon the order of Finance secretary Carlos Dominguez to shut down POGOs with tax liabilities, the BIR started its crackdown on POGOs last September. MANILA – President Rodrigo Duterte has given the Philippine Offshore Gaming Operators (POGOs) a three-day ultimatum to settle their tax liabilities. Latest BIR data showed that a total of P1.63 billion in witholding taxes was collected from POGOs and service providers from January to August this year. The bureau collected around P579 million in 2018 and P175 million in 2017./PNlast_img read more

Dedigout on top in Boyne drama

first_imgDedigout ran out a convincing winner of the Ladbrokes Ireland Boyne Hurdle at Navan after drama at the final flight in the Grade Two contest. Bryan Cooper always looked comfortable on the Tony Martin-trained 6-4 favourite, who was coming off the back of a victory in the Galmoy Hurdle, and all looked to be going to plan when he hit the front after jumping the third-last flight. But Briar Hill was switched to put in a powerful challenge under Ruby Walsh and had just hit top gear when he fell at the last, allowing Dedigout to ease away from Zaidpour to score by two and a half lengths, with Gerdago running a fine race in third. Press Associationcenter_img Martin said: “He jumped well coming back to this trip. He always had the pace and the ground helped his stamina come into play. “Ruby was a bit unlucky and who knows what would have happened if he’d stood up, I thought we had a little left and it would have been interesting to see.” Dedigout was trimmed to 20-1 from 25-1 for the Ladbrokes World Hurdle at Cheltenham with Paddy Power, who cut Briar Hill to 16-1 from 25-1. Boylesports left Dedigout unchanged at 20-1. However, Martin warned: “Hopefully our fellow is OK in the morning, and there will have to be at least yielding in the ground wherever he goes. We’ll get him home and see where we go from there.” Cooper told At The Races: “Tony’s done a great job getting him back. He loves that soft ground, it’s a big help to him. He’s doing nothing wrong so far “I was in front sooner than I wanted and I wasn’t doing much in front. I’d be hoping if my lad got into a battle he’d come out the other side. Ruby was maybe travelling the better, but I always thought I had plenty up my sleeve. “There’s another one in him, no doubt, but we’ll be very careful where we go. It will want to be good, even ground wherever he does go.” The victory was part of a treble for owners Gigginstown House Stud, who also scored with Very Wood and Cogryhill. last_img read more