Great Harvest Bread’s Summer Line-up

first_imgSubmitted by Great Harvest Bread CompanyLocally owned and operated Great Harvest Bread Co. has been part of the Olympia community for nearly a year and a half. When the store opened in January 2011, the lineup of offerings was fairly simple, but thanks to suggestions from customers and staff, they’ve added a little something for everyone!Over the past year, the owners, Jim and Kerry Norem, have met an increasing demand for gluten-free items as well as provided organic wheat and sourdough breads, focaccia and a few new sandwiches! Every month, great care and preparation are taken when adding delicious new items to the menu.Let’s take a look at what goes on at Great Harvest, and see what’s in store for June!One of the most exciting new additions to the menu this month has to be the Bacon Cheddar Beer Bread. This is a 100% whole wheat beer bread made with local beer from Fish Brewing Co. and is one of several premium breads offered. Great Harvest is excited to be baking not only mouth-watering Bacon Cheddar Beer hamburger buns for memorable summer barbecues, but they’re making white, whole wheat and Cheddar Garlic hamburger buns too!For those who desire or require gluten-free baked goods, don’t think they’ve forgotten about you! Gluten-free hamburger buns will be available all summer long, made to order in any flour or amount you desire. Aside from buns, the gluten-free options are plentiful – from delicious scones and cookies to hearty Flax Oat Walnut bread that’s great for sandwiches and toast!Another exciting addition to the gluten-free lineup in June will be our Groovy Granola, which has been a favorite since Great Harvest opened, but now they’ll also be making some with no gluten!While Great Harvest will be providing the premium breads and sweets that you’ve come to love since their grand opening, the focus in June is on summer activities. Jim Norem is excited to provide baked goods and sandwiches to the community while ensuring that you get out and do what you really want: enjoy the sun! “We’ve got energy bars for hiking and great box lunches for road trips and picnics so people can take advantage of the beautiful outdoors,” Jim said. He also said that if anyone needs a specialty item or wants to place an order for a special occasion, all they have to do is call!As you know, Washington summers are beyond compare. With so many barbecues, special events and warm days and nights, why not enjoy and share some quality, hand-made baked goods made right here in Olympia with fresh and local ingredients? Great Harvest is looking forward to a fantastic summer filled with friends, good times and great bread! Facebook29Tweet0Pin0last_img read more

Stinky Pamphlet In Upcoming PSE Bills Offers Natural Gas Safety Tips

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0 BELLEVUE, Wash.–The Puget Sound Energy bills now reaching more than 1.5 million homes and businesses through October include a scratch and sniff pamphlet to remind customers of the odorant used to help identify natural gas leaks.A scratch on the natural gas safety pamphlet releases a distinctive, sulfur-like aroma, a smell similar to rotten eggs. To help detect natural gas leaks more easily, PSE and other natural gas utilities add an odorant, called mercaptan, to natural gas, which is naturally odorless and colorless.“Every family needs to know that ‘rotten egg’ odor of natural gas so they can recognize, react and report a gas leak around their home or elsewhere,” said Andy Wappler, vice president of corporate affairs for PSE. “Safety comes first, and having your family know what to do is our top priority.”In addition to bearing the “rotten egg smell”, the pamphlet also guides people to call 811 two days before digging to prevent damage to underground utility lines and on how to recognize and safely report suspected natural gas leaks by going to a safe location and calling us at 1-888-225-5773 or 911 from a safe distance. PSE natural gas technicians will respond immediately at no charge from service centers located across Western Washington.If a natural gas odor is smelled inside a house or building, the occupants should leave the premises immediately.If anyone suspects a natural gas leak, follow these steps:Leave the area immediately.Do not use phones, turn any electric switches, appliances or lights on or off.Do not smoke, light a match, use a lighter or do anything that might create a spark.Use a phone well away from the area and call PSE, 24 hours a day, at 1-888-225-5773, or 911.“Smell isn’t the only way to detect a natural gas leak,” added Wappler. “A hissing sound or blowing dirt may also indicate a possible natural gas leak.”About Puget Sound EnergyWashington state’s oldest local energy company, Puget Sound Energy serves 1.1 million electric customers and more than 750,000 natural gas customers in 11 counties. A subsidiary of Puget Energy, PSE meets the energy needs of its customers, in part, through cost-effective energy efficiency, procurement of sustainable energy resources, and far-sighted investment in energy-delivery infrastructure. PSE employees are dedicated to providing great customer service that is safe, dependable and efficient. For more information, visit www.PSE.com.last_img read more

Know to Grow program puts young farmers to the test

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Supporting the next generation of farmers is one of the key purposes of Farm Credit Mid-America’s Growing Forward initiative. The program, which started in 2014, just hosted its annual Know to Grow conference in Columbus.The two-day event featured a wide range of topics, with speakers covering anything from the basics of understanding the farm’s financials, to succession planning to way to maximize the farm’s position financially.The value of a meeting like the Know to Grow conference is not only help young and beginning farmers who are looking for ideas and new ways to keep the farm profitable, it is also of value to Farm Credit Mid-America as these up and coming farmers learn to be better borrowers.“Many young and beginning farmers are very good at the production aspect of what they do on the farm, but we are trying to shift that mindset and get them to focus more on the financial management side,” said Jonathan Carter, AVP of Farm Credit Mid-America’s Growing Forward campaign. “The financial side of farming may not be as fun as driving a tractor but it is very essential is running a successful farming operation.”Gary Matteson, Farm Credit, gives the Keynote Address at this year’s Know to Grow ConferenceThe Keynote Speaker for the gathering was Farm Credit’s VP of Young, Beginning, Small Farmer Programs and Outreach, Gary Matteson. He told the roomful of nearly 100 farmers that the first thing they need to do in order to be successful is to define success.“Everybody can think about success as having 300 cows or a 300 horsepower tractor or 300 acres and those sorts of measures are what you grow up with on the farm,” Matteson said. “What comes from a session like this one is that these farmers can take those numbers and see just how profitable that scenario is. Maybe you can make more money with 125 cows than you can with 300. The ability to analyze the kind of dream you have and turn it into a plan is what I hope this conference accomplishes.”In order for a farm to be successful it, like any other business, requires three basic skills which include finance, production and marketing. Many farmers, who see production as their strong suit, will still try to do all of these skills at the same time, when the best strategy may be to delegate those other skills.“The financial skills are the easiest ones to hire through a book keeper or a loan officer to help you through some of those difficult planning questions that are needed for the financial aspect of your farm,” Matteson said. “Those tough questions are what build character. Young farmers need to understand that they will get asked some tough questions by a loan officer, whether they are financial or management related. They are simply seeking to understand the nature and scope of your business and if you understand why they need to ask those questions, then it’s going to be much easier to answer them.”Latham Farley was one of the beginning farmers taking part in the Know to Grow meetings. He is working with his wife’s family in Englewood, Ohio and a plan is in place for him to begin taking on more responsibilities in the near future. Farley started 2017 by building a business plan, an idea suggested by his Farm Credit Mid-America advisor. He was hoping to take away some more ideas from the conference to help him complete the task.“I didn’t know what to expect when I began putting my plan to paper, but when I got to identifying short and long-term goals and wrote out how I’d work the equipment side of things and work with my in-laws and then farm for myself it got pretty difficult,” Latham said. “The hard part was writing out how we actually do things on our farm and it made me have to think out how to organize my plan and just how viable the operation would be ten years down the road.”Rachel Heimerl is the Office Manager of Heimerl Farms, a large scale hog operation based in Johnstown, Ohio. Her motivation for being a part of the conference was unique in that she was looking to add value to her position and what she can offer to the family farm.“My goal is to better understand balance sheets and financial statements,” Heimerl said. “I want to be able to pull that type of information from our accounting system and help the farm make better decisions in the future.”Currently, with large supplies of pork on the market for the foreseeable future, the hog business is not the easiest one to be in. That is why finding the “balance” in the balance sheet is so important for Heimerl.“Every decision we are making needs to be a sound one,” Heimerl said. “We can’t overspend and we have to keep a close eye on the markets. There are so many other farmers down the line that are depending on that.”AUDIO: Know to Grow program puts young farmers to the testTy’s Wrap for Wednesday LONGlast_img read more

BEST Character awards highlight attributes of exhibitors

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Lea Kimley and Matt ReeseWork ethic, a positive attitude, patience, and focus — those involved with showing livestock have long understood there are many positive character traits young people can develop through working with animals.In 2018 the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association BEST (Beef Exhibitor Show Total) Program took the opportunity to formally recognize some of these character traits and the young people who display them throughout the show season. The 2018 BEST Character Trait awards highlighted attitude, focus and patience. Throughout the winter and spring show series, any OCA member or BEST participant or their parents could nominate other cattlemen, breeders or exhibitors for any of the Character Trait Awards.“This past year was our first year doing this and we worked with some of the leadership programs with Weaver Leather Livestock. They are a sponsoring partner for the BEST program and we worked with them to recognize the character traits. Everyone can nominate throughout the season and then the final decisions go to a selection committee,” said Stephanie Sindel, OCA Director of Youth Programs. “I think it is exciting to see the kids get recognized in places other than the show ring. I really enjoy the component that others can nominate their fellow contestants. It also provides another way for people to get involved in the program.”Jacob LeBrun, Scioto County was recognized for having an outstanding attitude; Jordan Johnson, Gallia County, was recognized for his extreme focus; and Collin Britton, Wood County was awarded for his exceptional patience.“They are very exemplary for the areas they have been recognized in and the dedication they put forth every day,” Sindel said. “There is only one person who wins a show on a given weekend, but there is dedication and commitment that comes through all the time. All of those kids have also been very successful in the BEST Program and this is just another area of recognition. At the end of the day, what we are trying to do is to create the next generation of leaders and highlight those folks.”This year’s BEST program featured 15 sanctioned shows across the state with over 523 youth participants showing 749 head of market animals and heifers. Collin Britton, Wood CountyAnyone who has worked much with cattle understands that patience is an important virtue in the endeavor. When little sisters are involved, even more patience is required — just ask 15-year-old Collin Britton.“I helped my little sister (Sara Britton) a lot and that takes a lot of patience. We also work the cows here and it can get frustrating so you have to be patient with that too,” Collin said. “We’re probably going to 35 shows in a year and for a lot of those there are two rings so you show twice. We go to Denver, we go to NAILE, Junior Nationals and most of the BEST Shows and we go state fairs and beef expos. We’ve had a lot of success from last year to this year. We won our division there at Denver and had Champion Simmental overall in Ohio BEST. My sister had third overall Shorthorn in BEST. She had third overall in showmanship at Junior Nationals. We had two class winners and a second at Junior Nationals too. She also had the Champion Shorthorn Junior Breeding Heifer at the Ohio State Fair. She has done unbelievably well for her first year showing calves. I couldn’t be more proud.”Collin has been showing in the BEST Program for three years and he is also proud to be recognized for his patience by his peers through the BEST Character Trait awards.“I think it is an awesome thing they have started to do. It is a truly great program overall with all of the shows you go to and the people you meet,” he said. “The BEST experience gets you ready for all of the other shows you go to. I look forward to seeing all of the people I show with all winter at the BEST shows. Going through all of the states and sight seeing is pretty fun also.” Jacob LeBrun, Scioto CountyJacob LeBrun, 15, of Scioto County won the positive attitude Character Trait award in this year’s BEST circuit.“I always try to keep a smile on my face and encourage others,” he said. “It’s important to always be happy in order to be a light to others.”LeBrun can typically be found in the barn trying to lift up others, no matter the mood. He believes the new program will give deserved credit to the behind-the-scenes kids and he acknowledges he would not have received this award without the help of his family and the Grimes family of Hillsboro.“I only see it getting better throughout the next few years,” LeBrun said of the first year of the Character Trait program.LeBrun’s father showed cattle when he was a boy and this encouraged LeBrun to start showing as well. They began raising a few calves for him to show each year and have built their herd off of past show heifers.The BEST program requires a lot of time, money, and work. This is LeBrun’s fourth year completing the circuit and sixth year showing cattle.“Showing cattle keeps me going,” he said. “I have had a passion for it since I started.”Showing cattle has helped LeBrun make lifelong friends and learn the value of hard work. Seeing the friends he made through the BEST program and spending quality time with them is what he was most looking forward to heading into the Ohio State Fair this year.In the BEST Program this year, along with being recognized for his character, LeBrun received 6th overall Angus heifer and 7th overall intermediate showman. He also showed his heifer at the Ohio State Fair. Jordan Johnson, Gallia CountyJordan Johnson, 19, of Gallia County received the BEST focus Character Trait award. Johnson has been showing for 10 years. Additionally, he runs a small herd and sells calves to several people. He enjoys giving back to his customers and puts in plenty of effort toward helping them.“I am grateful to have won this award and am excited to see the progress the program makes throughout the years,” Johnson said.Through the hours of hard work and determination to be the best, Johnson has also learned about responsibility. In addition, the BEST program has taught Johnson how to communicate with others, the value of teamwork, and helped build friendships.Everyone has to start somewhere. Johnson’s parents both showed livestock growing up, but took a break until Johnson was in 4-H. They weren’t very competitive at the beginning, but after a taste of victory when winning grand champion feeder calf at the county fair, they never looked back.“My favorite part of the process is selecting the cattle and choosing the genetics, then putting in as much work as possible to get the full potential and quality out of the cattle,” Johnson said.Johnson is dedicated to leaving his mark and helping the next generation of showman. Johnson just finished his last Ohio State Fair as a junior exhibitor and he is hoping all the hard work he’s put in through the years will pay off in the future. Johnson is currently attending the University of Rio Grande majoring in business and minoring in marketing. Johnson hopes to stay in the livestock business on the marketing side and continue to raise cattle.“Showing and raising cattle is my passion, I live and breathe it every day,” Johnson said. Those interested in learning more about participating in the BEST program can visit www.ohiocattle.org and follow OCA on their social media platforms. The BEST program will be celebrating 20 years of recognizing Ohio’s junior beef exhibitors for participation and placings through a series of sanctioned cattle shows that include showmanship competitions. Juniors who participate in these sanctioned shows earn points for their placings. Points are tabulated for cattle, showmanship, registered Bred & Owned animals and first or second year BEST participants in a separate Novice division for market animals, heifers and showmanship. The program concludes with a celebration of all BEST participants along with their families on the first Saturday in May of 2019.last_img read more

Blog Review: Green Building in Denver

first_imgWhy slab foundations are goodThe conventional wisdom in cold climates for basements (since we stopped hand-digging them) has been, “If you need to go down 4′ for a crawl space foundation, why not just dig another 4′ and throw in a basement?” The marginal costs are very low per square foot, definitely less than building the second floor…My cost analyses, however, are showing me that a frost-protected monolithic slab is more cost-effective than a basement as long as the land is cheap. Once the price of land reaches about $20/sq. ft., then a basement may be required by the home-buying market. In other words, the neighborhood is so expensive that the buyers expect the extra square footage of a basement.The tipping point in favor of slab-on-grade over crawl space is that the slab can be the finished floor. Stained concrete is still trendy, bulletproof, and saves at least $3/sq.ft. on your floor system. On radiant-floor heatRadiant floor heat is considered by many to be the most comfortable method of delivering heat. Even zero energy homes need a source of backup heating. Therefore, radiant is often the choice in high end custom homes, when cost is trumped by comfort and “sizzle.”After building and living in a near zero energy home now for three years, we have learned that radiant heat is quite comfortable when it is on. The trouble is, the solar and superinsulation aspects of the house prevent it from coming on very often. In fact, it hasn’t been worth the extra cost of the system (about $10k more than a forced air system), and we wouldn’t do it again.Additional challenges with radiant floor heat:A completely separate ducted system is required for summer air conditioning. A swamp cooler in Denver is by far the best choice (it typically won’t use ductwork).In order to filter, humidify, and ventilate, a separate ducted system must be installed. (Now add $5k to the above $10k).The heating system is at risk of freezing in extreme conditions with a power failure. On a rating system that really worksI’ve finally found my dream house rating system, which is just like an EPA rating label for an appliance or a car.I’ve been saying for years that as consumers get more educated about energy efficiency in homes, the demand for efficient homes will increase, and the selling price of those homes will increase.Well, I’m tired of waiting*, so this rating system gives the consumers what they need to know NOW.NOTE: this is a rating system, and by definition, can only be measured on a house that has been built. This will prevent the most insidious types of greenwashing, like advertising a LEED rating before the home has been built.There isn’t any “embodied energy” rating here, but I think a third scale for that would start making this rating system too confusing. The embodied energy of a low energy new home is small enough to be ignored for now. If and when a carbon tax is implemented, that will be reflected in the selling price of the house.*I realized that until Realtors understand this stuff, most consumers have no hope. I haven’t yet met a Realtor who really understands the difference between a KW and a KWH. On the importance of low-maintenance featuresSustainable Housing can be defined as housing that conserves resources as much as possible.What’s the most important resource to the average person? Their MONEY. Therefore, new green built homes should not only aim for zero energy, but also for zero maintenance. Life’s too short to paint siding.center_img Kevin Dickson was an early convert to solar energy. He earned a bachelor of science degree from the Colorado School of Mines in 1977, and a master’s degree in mechanical engineering and solar technology from Colorado State University in 1979. In the early 1980s, he was involved in hundreds of solar thermal systems and received several design patents.Thirty years later, Dickson’s focus is on net-zero energy home design, and to that end he writes a blog called Green Building in Denver where he comments on a slew of products and issues involving energy-efficient construction.He makes no bones about the blog’s local bent. He offers, for example, a number of suggestions for energy code improvements for his community and comments regularly on policies of his local electric utility. Given that one aim of sustainable building is to make structures appropriate to their specific locales, making the blog local seems completely appropriate. The site would be a boon for anyone in a similar climate zone, if not right in Denver.You don’t, however, have to be from Denver or Colorado to take something away from Dickson’s blog. His reach is broad enough to welcome in just about anyone with an interest in energy efficient design. If he finds something of interest elsewhere, he’ll report on that, too.Dickson lives in a “near zero energy home” himself, so he can speak from personal experience on the pros and cons of various low-energy strategies (for a detailed look at the house, check the blog entry from Oct. 6, 2008). And to his credit, when something he’s tried doesn’t work he’s happy to say so.And yes, he’s the same Kevin Dickson who’s a frequent contributor to the GBA Q&A forum.Here are some excerpts from the blog: On electric cars (from 2008)OK, you gotta keep your old clunker running 2-3 more years until the GM Volt is released.Current estimates have the Volt going about 40 miles before a little gas engine kicks in to increase range. Five more years of battery development will increase range enough to wean us from gas entirely.As we all have hoped, technology will get us out of this mess, and please note that the free market economy is what encourages innovations. Government incentive programs should be used sparingly. Case in point, the laws that encouraged ethanol production have affected food prices. It’s hard to predict unintended consequences, and the free market is smarter than any of us.last_img read more

Woman techie falls to death from office building in Pune

first_imgA 22-year-old IT engineer allegedly committed suicide by jumping off the seventh floor of a building here on Monday, police said.Ashwini Gaware was a trainee at a private company in Mundhwa’s Zero One IT Park building behind the Passport Office.Ms. Gaware hailed from Shirur taluk and was staying in the city’s Kharadi area.“She had been undergoing training in telecounselling at the company for the past four months. According to her colleagues and company personnel, she had not showed up for training for the past three-four days,” said Inspector Anil Patrudkar, speaking to The Hindu.She checked in at the office (located on the fourth floor) at 10.30 a.m. on Monday “Soon after, she proceeded to the balcony of the building’s seventh floor and took the extreme step. No suicide letter has been found,” said Mr. Patrudkar.The police are probing whether the trigger for the apparent suicide was depression or family problems. The body has been sent to Sassoon Hospital for post-mortem.In July last year, a 25-year-old software engineer from Andhra Pradesh jumped to his death from a hotel in the city’s Vimannagar area. In his suicide note, he had expressed concern at the uncertainty in the IT industry.last_img read more

Evening newswrap August 2, 2017

first_imgNo troop withdrawal at Doklam, says India as it rejects China’s claims Government sources said the Indian forces continue to stand, as earlier, against the Chinese troops.Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte calls North Korea’s Kim Jong-Un ‘son of a b***h’ over nuclear ambitionsPhilippines President Rodrigo Duterte calls North Korea’s Kim Jong-Un ‘son of a b***h’ over nuclear ambitionsImtiaz Ali on his first meeting with Shah Rukh: He had a drunk girl hanging on to himImtiaz Ali recalled his first meeting with Shah Rukh Khan in London in an interview.Dhawan or Mukund will have to make way for KL Rahul: KohliIndia and Sri Lanka will square off in the second Test at the Sinhalese Sports Club Ground in Colombo from Thursday.last_img read more