Mexico tops 10,000 COVID-19 deaths: Government

first_imgHowever, Mexico’s death rate compared to cases is much higher.It recorded almost 2,800 new cases on Monday taking its total over 93,000.”Today we began production activities related to the automotive industry, mining and the construction industry,” President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said earlier on Monday. “We have to move towards the new normal because it’s necessary for our national economy, our people’s wellbeing; we need to, little by little, return production, economic, social and cultural activity to normal.” Mexico’s tally of confirmed COVID-19 deaths passed 10,000 on Monday, the health secretary said, following an increase of 237 on the previous day.News of the updated toll — now 10,167 — came as Mexico announced it was gradually reopening its economy by reactivating its automotive, mining and construction sectors.Mexico is second only to Brazil in Latin America for COVID-19 deaths, although the South American giant has had close to three times as many. Topics :center_img Mexico shut down all but necessary economic activity on March 23, after Lopez Obrador had come under intense criticism and bucked the regional trend by resisting calls to impose a lockdown much earlier.On a visit to Quintana Roo state, where the popular Cancun seaside resort is located, Lopez Obrador also said tourism activity would be reopened from next week.last_img read more

Hammers stay out of stadium talks

first_img Press Association A House of Lords report was published on Tuesday which recommended the two clubs work together and even suggests the League One side be granted occasional use of the stadium, something they have long been pushing for. It adds another layer to what has been a seemingly interminable saga over who would move into the stadium and one that twisted this way and that for years before negotiations ended in March this year with the LLDC signing off West Ham as anchor tenants. The agreement saw the Barclays Premier League club take on a 99-year lease, with the stadium to be transformed into a 60,000-seater venue in time for the 2016-17 season. While Orient chairman Barry Hearn wants there to be three-way talks between the two clubs and the LLDC, for West Ham any discussions should be just between the League One club and the LLDC which owns and manages the stadium. “Looking forward, our focus is solely on creating a stunning new home for the club and its supporters in 2016, alongside a long-term legacy for the community of east London,” a spokesman for the Premier League club said. “What goes on with other interested parties is very much a matter for (Leyton Orient) and the LLDC and not West Ham United. “We welcome the committee’s comments and are happy the House of Lords have recognised that West Ham United’s selection will ensure the stadium reaches its full legacy potential.” Orient welcomed the report and on their website a statement from Hearn read: “I agree with the House of Lords recommendation – ourselves, West Ham and the LLDC should sit down and work this out together once and for all. “Leyton Orient is a local club which undertakes a huge amount of community work in one of the poorest areas in London. “It has been said that Orient did not bid enough to cover its costs of using the stadium, but we were bidding within our means and against ourselves – we do not know what the LLDC want from us because they will not tell us. “So we ask them again, publicly, to say what we have to pay to share the stadium, a national asset which is on our doorstep. “We are writing to the LLDC seeking a meeting so that we can have an open and transparent discussion about what part we can play in the future use of the Olympic Stadium.” A spokesman for the LLDC was not immediately available for comment. West Ham believe Leyton Orient need to hold discussions directly with the London Legacy Development Corporation without involving them if they are to come to a satisfactory solution over the Olympic Stadium.last_img read more