Computer Law Committee joins Business Law Section

first_img September 1, 2001 Regular News Computer Law Committee joins Business Law Section Computer Law Committee joins Business Law Section The Computer Law Committee has relinquished its position as one of the Bar’s substantive law standing committees, but it hasn’t disappeared. The committee has become part of the Business Law Section and is now accepting members. “The Business Law Section had been courting us for a couple of years to come over and join them,” said Stephen Krulin, chair of the committee. And thanks to the hard work of people like Sam Lewis, the immediate past chair, and Jose Rojas, another former chair, the committee did just that. Prior to becoming an official committee of the Business Law Section, the committee was governed by Bar guidelines which limited the membership to 50 people and imposed a six-year term limit for members. Because the committee was created in the early 1980s, many of its more experienced members were forced to step aside, according to Krulin. The committee also was financially limited, which allowed it to conduct only one CLE offering per year. Krulin said this made it hard for members to present information about current trends in the ever-changing field of computer law. The committee has always been comprised of people who know a great deal about computers and computer law, and who are, for the most part, at the cutting edge of computer-related arbitration, litigation, and mediation, Krulin said. “We approached our CLE efforts as an opportunity to open this experience to the Bar in general. Now, with the section, we’ll be open to providing additional programs,” Krulin said. With the reorganization, the committee will have access to the section’s CLE funds. The committee may also accept as many members as they’d like, including those seasoned members who previously left the committee. “We’re very happy to have them join our section,” said Business Law Section Chair David Felman. “We’re going to invest some money to help them do whatever they want.” Krulin likened the committee’s previous situation to a large plant in a small pot. “The more that we bloomed, the tighter it got. We wanted to expand, and the only way left to us was to become a section, which became impossible,” he said. The Computer Law Committee had sought section status for several years, but a lack of sufficient funding hampered its progress. Many members of the Business Law Section represent technology companies, and some were among the early Computer Law Committee members, which makes for a good pairing, according to Felman. The committee leaders weren’t nearly as confident about the match early on in the process, though. “We’ve got people who teach computer law, who work for businesses, who work for Internet companies, who work in the criminal sector. There’s a wide variety of people who aren’t strictly business lawyers,” Krulin said. “We polled the old-time members, the former chairs, former vice chairs, and posed the question.” The majority of committee members agreed it was a good idea, and when it came down to the final vote, the committee was unanimous. The Computer Law Committee’s first meeting as part of the section commenced at the section’s retreat in Naples in late August. Plans to offer the committee’s experience and knowledge to benefit the legislature’s consideration of upcoming technology and privacy issues were presented.last_img read more

Van Persie eyes further success

first_imgRobin van Persie has no intention of resting on his single Premier League title winners’ medal. It might be the end of an era at Old Trafford following the exit of Sir Alex Ferguson but Van Persie is intending it to be the start of a new one under David Moyes, adding: “That is the idea of all the lads. It is a great feeling to achieve it. We can enjoy it. It only gives you the taste for more. Hopefully next season we can win the double.” Pictures of the Arsenal outfit he left behind celebrating another top four finish underline the fundamental difference Van Persie felt at his old club. For he wanted something more than just a tilt at the Champions League. “I do think it is important for a player to win medals,” he said. “You play football to win. If you add up all those wins it has to end up in a big trophy.” Moyes was at Carrington for the first time on Monday morning. Until he heads on holiday at the end of the month, the 50-year-old will effectively be doing two jobs as there are still issues to tie up at Everton, who have yet to appoint the Scot’s successor. Moyes travelled to Unite’d’s training ground with Ferguson and popular United kit manager Albert Morgan to meet some members of staff for the first time. Although he does not officially start work until July 1, realistically, that start date is impractical as United head on tour on July 10 and return to pre-season training before then. Michael Carrick is excited about the arrival of Moyes, saying: “As players we are embracing the challenge. For so long we have had the stability of knowing what to expect. We could turn up for pre-season and know how we would be preparing. “There are going to be certain things that are new. But many will stay the same of course because there is a structure there and there is not a lot wrong. We are all looking forward to it. We are looking forward to the new manager coming in, working with him, improving as a squad and taking the club forward.” Press Associationcenter_img By his own admission, the Dutchman had grown increasingly frustrated at his failure to add to the FA Cup he lifted with Arsenal at Manchester United’s expense in 2005. It was one of the major reasons why the 29-year-old opted to make the £24million move to Old Trafford last summer. The switch has paid off handsomely, with Van Persie landing both the championship and the Golden Boot for the second season running, but the former Arsenal man told MUTV: “I am not thinking I have my medal and this is it. It tastes beautiful. But I know how it feels now and I want more.” last_img read more