HISE weekend includes press box reception, shadowing classes

first_imgEmily McConville The University of Notre Dame brought students from around the world to campus from April 6-8 to partake in the Hesburgh International Scholars Experience (HISE), which provides prospective international students with a glimpse into life at the University.According to assistant director of admissions Julie Moloney, the Latin American and Caribbean council initiated the program six years ago in hopes of providing international students with the opportunity to see and experience Notre Dame prior to making a college decision.“A lot of students don’t get the opportunity to visit Notre Dame before they have to make their decision, and we all know how beautiful this campus is and how great the people are,” she said.Moloney said the international students get the chance to experience the life of a Notre Dame student through the program.“We organize a lot of different activities and events for them,” Moloney said. “They get to do college information sessions with each of the different departments with a lot of professors and some of the academic advisors in the different departments.”In addition, Moloney said students are allowed to attend up to three classes in order to gain a better understanding of the academic aspect of student life. Participants also have the opportunity to observer dorm life and student-student interactions.“They get to stay in the dorms with student hosts, so the hope is that they’re getting to see Notre Dame from all angles before they have to make that decision as to where they see themselves the next four years,” she said.On Sunday night, the students partake in the press box event at Notre Dame stadium, according to the HISE agenda.“It’s really kind of neat for the students to be able to be up there,” Moloney said. “I think some of them realize how big of a deal it is, and some don’t until they come to Notre Dame.”Another trademark event of the weekend is the closing gala on Tuesday evening, Moloney said.“There’s a nice dinner, and there’s a speaker,” Moloney said. “Then we have a big dance afterwards with a photo booth and competitions. Everyone knows that they get to come, dress nicely for that and have a lot of fun.”Notre Dame has one of the highest percentages of students who study abroad among universities in the United States, and Moloney said it is also important to have international students attend the University.“Adding diverse minds and cultures is really enriching all across the board,” she said. “I think students that come back from [study abroad] experiences are so enriched academically and culturally.“I think that it aligns perfectly with the mission of the university to be bringing these diverse minds to Notre Dame just to stir the pot a little bit in terms of students that have grown up in different parts of the world with completely different cultures and completely different university systems and education systems.”Moloney said she hopes the HISE experience shows students all of Notre Dame’s strengths and allows them to decide if the University is the right fit for them.“We have programming that really reflects around what I kind of say are three pillars of Notre Dame,” Moloney said. “The mind, heart and spirit … our tradition of academics, community, spirituality.Despite being a respected academic institution, Notre Dame is not the right fit for everyone, Moloney said, but she added that if a student is interested in community and spirituality as aspects of a college experience, then Notre Dame is a good choice.“I think every student that graduates from here, you know that you’re graduating not just with a top-notch education, but you’ve also grown a lot personally in every aspect of the way,” she said.Moloney said Notre Dame is a place where students might experience their highest and lowest moments, but through these experiences, students grow markedly.“In a nutshell, I would recommend students to Notre Dame if that sense of growing as a whole person really appeals to them and knowing that, when you graduate, you’re going to be tasked with making a difference in the world, whatever you choose to do,” Moloney said.This task falls to students in every major, whatever career path they choose, Moloney said.“We’re challenging all of our students and all of our graduates to go on and make a difference,” Moloney said. “I think that’s one of the reasons I think people are attracted to Notre Dame because it is so mission-centered and because it comes with such a heavy task but a very manageable task.”Tags: HISE Prospective Studentslast_img read more

Sammy Harold Brown

first_imgOur town lost a longtime citizen and friend, “Sammy” Harold Brown, age 71, who was called home late Tuesday, April 25. He was born in Edmonton, Kentucky, the son of the late James and Evelyn (Jessee) Brown on December 20, 1945. In his early years, he grew up in Kentucky, and around 6th grade the family moved to Indiana. He attended Sand Creek and then onto Versailles, graduating from there.After high school he became employed at Batesville Casket Company. He worked his entire career there, giving 45 years. As life began to move on, he met the love of his life Deborah Ann Forwalt at the former Dunbar and Bultman restaurant, and he married her on November 20, 1971 and built a family with her over the last 45 plus years. They built a home in between Napoleon and Batesville and raised 4 boys and 1 daughter. Since retirement he and Debbie had built a new home in the town of Osgood. To say life was busy and blessed would be an understatement; his love for his children and grandchildren was very strong. His heart ached last summer with the passing of his son Bret, a tremendous loss.His involvement in different organizations was a commitment he had made; he was a proud member of the Osgood Legion, Eagles of Aurora, and American Legion Riders of Ripley County. He had a strong faith and attended Cedar Creek Community Church.Sam fought sickness for the last 5 years, but in February of 2016 began his toughest fight. No one here can say he lost the fight, merely it was his time. His greatest enjoyment of fun was riding his motorcycle! Sam loved to tease and aggravate all of his grandchildren; they were the greatest gifts he ever received!He was preceded in death by his parents, son Bret, and sister Betty Brown. He is survived by wife Debbie of Osgood, sons Chad Edward and Mark Alan (Vanessa) both of Osgood, son Brad Lee of Columbus, daughter April McQueen of Versailles, brother J. C. (Carolyn) Brown of Osgood, and sister Becky (Ron) Sutton of Holton, along with 12 grandchildren and 7 great grandchildren. A visitation will be at Neal’s Funeral Home in Osgood on Thursday, April 27, 2017 from 4-7 p.m. The funeral service will also be at Neal’s Funeral Home on Friday, April 28, 2017 at 11 a.m., with doors opening at 9 a.m., followed by burial at New Marion Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, the family request memorials are made out to the New Marion Cemetery in care of the funeral home. Services entrusted to Neal’s Funeral Home. www.nealsfuneralhome.netlast_img read more