Sunshine through the walls

first_imgA few days ago I was enjoying a weekend with my husband and my son.We had taken a dip in our pool due to the hot summer day.We had watched a movie together.It was just one of those weekends that you tend to smile about long after they are done.We decided on Sunday evening to take another dip in the pool with friends when we heard a massive crash inside our home.My husband went to investigate and instantly came back outside.What was it? – I asked.Our son’s ceiling caved in – he replied calmly.BE SERIOUS! – I exclaimed.Little did I know at that point, that he was.I remember going into that room and picturing where all of our son’s things were.Where he most often was and how fatal it really could have been had he been in there.All of the sudden all of those “things” were truly just things.All of the sudden we had a vivid reminder of what was really important.Anyone that really knows me, knows that I have anxiety.Although I used to be quite hush hush about it, I have found that talking about it is not only therapeutic but a way to connect with others.Needless to say, this caused a meltdown of epic proportions.I placed a friendship SOS and was greeted with friends and family far and wide sending me votes of confidence and nuggets of faith.Why am I telling you this?Do you know who surrounded us with love and empathy immediately?My credit union family.The people that I have been blessed enough to meet in this movement.Some I have met.Some I just know through the community of financial superheroes.People I had never personally met offering to drive to my home and help the best that they could.Phone calls.Messages.Texts.As I was contemplating what to write about for my article this time, it occurred to me that THIS was exactly what I needed to say.The credit union movement surpasses the financial walls.It doesn’t end at the front door or when the last person leaves the office for the night.Credit union people seem to just carry this magical component with them.Maybe it’s because we learn what caring and empathy means.Maybe it’s because we have seen folks struggle and we have seen them come out the other side better than ever.Maybe it’s just because CU folks are just darn good people.All I know is that I am experiencing a low right now.I am worried, anxious, and every other adult word that makes your spine tingle.Despite all of those feelings, my credit union family continues to lift my spirits and restore my faith that everything will be okay.This is my shout out.My shout out to all of my CU people far and wide.You’re amazing people.You do amazing things.You make amazing connectionsYou make amazing differences in people’s lives.That hole in my son’s room is just potential for greater change.I know that because the credit union movement and the people within it taught me. 11SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Nanci Wilson Nanci started her credit union journey due to lack of kindness.That fact is what led her to close her bank account and open up at a credit union.Ultimately … Web: https://www.universityfederalcu.org Detailslast_img read more

UK pensions regulator wins court case on peripatetic workers

first_imgThe UK High Court has ruled in favour of The Pensions Regulator (TPR) in the first judicial review of the latter’s approach in relation to automatic enrolment.The case concerned the position the TPR took in relation to peripatetic workers, such as seafarers and airline pilots.It was brought by Fleet Maritime Services (Bermuda) (FMSB), a company that employs seafarers who work on ships owned by Carnival, such as P&O Cruises and Cunard.In July 2014, TPR effectively ordered FMSB to auto-enrol qualifying employees, setting out its approach and guidance in a compliance notice to the company. FMSB challenged this with TPR, but, in September 2014, the regulator affirmed its decision, prompting the employer to seek a judicial review of the decision.FMSB argued that many of its UK staff were not covered by the Pensions Act 2008, as they worked in international waters and could not be said to “ordinarily work in the UK”. TPR argued that the location of the workers’ base was the primary consideration and not their contracts.Shortly before Christmas, the UK High Court ruled that the regulator’s approach on peripatetic workers was correct and concluded that the “base test” and not the “contract test” was the most appropriate test to apply when establishing where such a worker “ordinarily works”.TPR chief executive Lesley Titcomb welcomed the judgment, also noting that the judge made clear that “decisions of the regulator based on the assessment of particular facts are not ordinarily suitable for judicial review”.The High Court ruled in favour of the company in relation to those workers who regularly begin and end tours of duty in non-UK ports.last_img read more