What not to say when asking for a raise

first_img 21SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Tyler Atwell Web: www.cuinsight.com Details “I’m leaving if I don’t get a raise”Never give an ultimatum. While it may seem like a good idea to show how serious you are, it won’t turn out well for you. If you do get the raise, chances are your relationship with your boss has taken a turn for the worse. And if it doesn’t work, you could be in a tough spot if you’re not prepared to follow through.“I am a harder worker than (Co-worker’s name)”You might know this to be true, but you should never bring this up in conversation, especially when asking for a raise. Never compare yourself to others. If it backfires, you may not be happy with what the response you get. Focus on what you have accomplished for the company and how your achievements warrant the bigger salary.“I haven’t had a raise since…”Stop right there. When you’re trying to convince someone to invest more money into you, the last thing you want to do is start by complaining. Not to mention, there may be a reason you haven’t had a raise lately. It doesn’t necessarily mean your work isn’t deserving of the compensation, but other factors like where the company is financially may be at play here. If your place of business isn’t currently turning a profit, more than likely they can’t afford to pay you more.“I need a raise because my expenses are high”It’s never a bad idea to keep your personal life and work life separated. Whatever expenses you are running into, planning to buy a house, medical or just living beyond your means, they are irrelevant to you getting a raise. Your boss may feel sympathetic, but beyond that all it does is make you look bad. You are asking for more money because of a perceived inability to plan with the money you currently make.last_img read more

NASA Drops Racially Charged Nicknames of Celestial Bodies

first_imgFor example, “Eskimo Nebula” and “Siamese Twins Galaxy” will no longer be used.“Nicknames are often more approachable and public-friendly than official names for cosmic objects, such as Barnard 33, whose nickname ‘the Horsehead Nebula’ invokes its appearance,” NASA said in a release last week. “But often seemingly innocuous nicknames can be harmful and detract from the science.”Additionally, NASA is examining its use of phrases for planets, galaxies and other cosmic objects “as part of its commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion.”As we work to identify & address systemic discrimination & inequality in all aspects of the scientific community, we are reexamining the use of unofficial terminology for cosmic objects which can be not only insensitive, but actively harmful. Read more: https://t.co/ZNicp5g0Wh pic.twitter.com/jDup6JOGBd— NASA (@NASA) August 5, 2020 NASA is apparently taking a cue from grocery store items, pro sports teams, and country music bands which have all removed racially insensitive names in recent weeks and months.The space agency just announced it is adding celestial bodies to the list that already includes Aunt Jemima, the Washington Football Team and hitmakers The Chicks and Lady A. The space agency goes on to say that it “will use only the official, International Astronomical Union designations in cases where nicknames are inappropriate.”Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington, DC, explains, “Science is for everyone, and every facet of our work needs to reflect that value.”Last June, Dreyer’s Grand Ice Cream said it was dropping the brand “Eskimo Pie” after a century. The word is commonly used in Alaska to refer to Inuit and Yupik people, according to the Alaska Native Language Center at the University of Alaska.“This name is considered derogatory in many other places because it was given by non-Inuit people and was said to mean ‘eater of raw meat,’” the company stated at the time.“Siamese twins” is considered to be an antiquated expression for conjoined twins, based on brothers from Siam (now Thailand) who were used as sideshow freaks in the 19th century.last_img read more