Figure it out yourself

first_imgOn the first day of class, the instructor handed out spaghetti, string, tape, and marshmallows to the eight students gathered around a table and asked them to build the tallest possible freestanding structure and place the marshmallow on top, in 18 minutes.Created by the designer and author Tom Wujec to foster teamwork, leadership, and creativity, the “marshmallow challenge” was the perfect tool for Victor Pereira Jr. to start his “Introduction to Teaching Science” course on a summer afternoon.“Science is about problem-solving and collaboration,” Pereira, a lecturer in education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE), told the students. “Everything you need to know about science instruction is in the marshmallow challenge.”Students worked in groups to build the spaghetti structures. When time was up, their creations wobbled for a few seconds before collapsing under the marshmallow’s weight.“Is there something I could have done to help you succeed?” Pereira asked his students. After a brief conversation, one worried aloud that the teacher’s help would have limited their ability to learn on their own.Pereira, who has 14 years of experience teaching high school science in Boston Public Schools under his belt and who is also master teacher in residence of the Harvard Teacher Fellows Program, smiled knowingly. The answer is at the center of a long and passionate debate in education, with experts divided over whether freedom or structure is the best way to maximize learning.Irene Liu (from left), Eunice Park, and Sam Fogel use spaghetti and tape to support a marshmallow during an exercise. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer“Do we let students discover things on their own or do we give it to them?” said Pereira. “There is room for both. Are we training students to be scientists or are we helping them become scientifically literate and informed citizens?”Students take Pereira’s class in the summer, absorbing teaching pedagogy by learning how to design inquiry-based lessons, developing syllabi and curricula, and reflecting on their role as educators. In the fall, they take a full-time session in which they focus more on teaching science.Pereira’s is among the courses offered through the Teacher Education Program, an 11-month master’s program at HGSE that aims to improve teaching in urban public schools and help students become independent learners and critical thinkers.Open to both recent college graduates and mid-career professionals, the program offers hands-on teaching experience at schools in Boston, Cambridge, Somerville, and Chelsea, with a special focus on social justice and equity issues. Along with classes on how to teach science, English, history, and social studies, future teachers also take courses on race and power in urban classrooms, urban youth, and teaching in urban schools.The social justice component was a big draw for Sam Fogel, who dreams of helping high school students examine biology and race, nutrition and health, and asthma and pollution.“The reason why I’m here is to learn more and be a better educator,” said Fogel. “Our role as educators is to make students aware of issues of inequity around the country and the world. I want my students to be aware of what’s going around us even if [it’s] not directly related to our material.”Pereira’s course also stresses the need to make science relevant to students’ everyday lives as opposed to asking them to memorize facts, theories, and formulas. Science is about making observations, finding patterns, and asking questions, all of which are applicable in any field, Pereira noted.The future teachers are sent into the field to co-teach with veteran educators and learn by doing how to prepare lessons and deliver them. For Emily Donaldson, this has proved a valuable step toward teaching with confidence.“We’re learning how to manage the classroom,” said Donaldson, who loves biology and teaching and is balancing the program with her senior year at the College. “Also, how to deliver inquiry-based instruction, facilitate discussion, and how to prepare for classes so that we’re able to anticipate anxieties.”The program has helped Erin Bleck be more mindful of the impact she can have as a teacher in city schools. “Harvard has pushed me one step further,” said Bleck, who taught before entering the master’s program, “and has made me think what it means for me and my students.”For Pereira, the program’s main takeaway is experience-based learning. In the marshmallow challenge and beyond, teachers have to help students gain the tools to discover things on their own.“Some beginning teachers, and even veteran teachers, like to be efficient and say everything to the students,” he said. “Our future teachers are learning that they have to design instruction where students are in charge of their own learning. They have to let students be the navigators in the classroom instead of the audience.”SaveSaveSavelast_img read more

Rosie O’Donnell Hosts Rare Standup Special Saturday

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York In her long and somewhat bumpy career, Rosie O’Donnell was never afraid to wear her heart on her sleeve. After all, it was the Commack native’s vulnerability that made her early work so memorable to audiences and producers alike.Almost seven years after her last stint of televised standup, on the short-lived variety program Rosie Live, O’Donnell will be returning to her roots to bare it all in the HBO special Rosie O’Donnell: A Heartfelt Standup.The special revolves around issues O’Donnell dealings with every day life—motherhood, marriage and health. While the comic may be naturally funny, there is more of a tell-all tone to her routine than typical standup. O’Donnell referred to it as a “heart-to-heart” on her Instagram.The special may have trouble finding an audience besides her most loyal fans because of the loftier issues, some critics have said.“She hasn’t shaped the comedy well enough to prevent a lot of this from feeling more like a public-service announcement than a stand-up performance,” Variety reported.But, the trailer of the special reveals some hilarious moments. O’Donnell entertains the audience with anecdotes ranging from the lesbian dating scene to her son masturbating.In the final 20 minutes of the show, O’Donnell openly discussed her recent heart attack. O’Donnell admittedly used this time to promote life saving and preventive measures for women with heart problems. She even performed a rap dedicated to the symptoms of heart disease.“When the doctor said I was having a heart attack, I’m like, ‘Shouldn’t that feel like Mike Tyson punched me in the tit?’” O’Donnell recalled.The special airs just two days after O’Donnell’s final appearance on The View. Viewers celebrated her re-taking a platform that enabled her to speak her strong opinions.O’Donnell was originally on The View in 2006, but left the show after multiple on-air disputes and an infamous celebrity feud with Donald Trump. Despite getting along with new co-workers and patching things up with Barbara Walters, O’Donnell made the decision to leave on her own this time.“The truth is I had a heart attack two years ago,” she said in a YouTube video, addressing her fans. “And stress is very bad for a heart attack.”In addition to the stress of hosting one of America’s most watched day-time talk shows, O’Donnell is also going through a divorce to second wife, Michelle Rounds.Fans hoped she would provide an explanation on The View this week, she said. However, O’Donnell rejected the idea and her departure was not mentioned.She used the video as a more personal address to her fans. O’Donnell also used it as an opportunity to continue spreading awareness of heart attack symptoms.“Survivors: You should minimize your stress, maximize your exercise and control your diet,” O’Donnell said. “That’s what you need to do for a healthy heart.”This new turn for O’Donnell may just be the next step of her evolution as a performer and a person. She’s played many roles in her life including comic, Star Search contestant, movie star, talk show host and gay rights advocate. No one’s career is certain, but for now O’Donnell is putting her family and her health first.Rosie O’Donnell: A Heartfelt Standup premieres 10 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 14 on HBO and HBOGO.com.last_img read more

Busy Year for JFSE in Asia Pacific

first_imgJames Fisher Subsea Excavation (JFSE) said it has provided 200 days of operational expertise in the  region to date in 2019.The projects have included several work scopes for Woen Jinn Harbor Engineering (WJH) at offshore windfarm sites in Taiwan.JFSE’s Twin R2000 spread has been mobilised for more than 300 days in the past two years, supporting WJH’s efforts on major Taiwanese energy projects.Bruce Lee, director at WJH, said: “JFSE has become a trusted partner in our work. We have a very collaborative relationship developing solutions which streamline the excavation element of our projects.”These projects have included trenching and deburying cables at Formosa 1, near Miaoli on the west coast of Taiwan – a 130MW windfarm that is the country’s first commercial-scale offshore wind project.Elsewhere in the Asia Pacific region, JFSE’s SP6000 and LARS system has provided trench maintenance and remedial post trenching services at a remote site in Papua, Indonesia as part of a major project to increase the total capacity at a gas liquefaction plant. The team recently returned to the site and is currently providing operational supporting to assist the client with another work scope.JFSE’s T8000 is preparing three areas of seabed for jacket leg installation in Malaysia and will soon be mobilising to assist with a pipeline repair project elsewhere in the region.More than 200 operational days in Asia Pacific are already contracted for the remainder of 2019 across a number of project sites.Richard Beattie, regional director at JFSE said:“The Asia Pacific market is enjoying a strong period with the extension of oil and gas sites and the growth of the renewables industry. We have been working in this region for many years and have tools based in multiple strategic locations so are well-placed to respond to the needs of new and existing clients.”last_img read more

Syracuse wins 3-straight sets, beats Connecticut 3-2

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Down 2-0 after two close sets, Syracuse (2-0) came all the way back, winning the next three to defeat UConn (5-2) in the final game of the UConn Invitational in Storrs, Connecticut. Freshman Polina Shemanova led the way for the Orange with a team-high 18 kills after racking up 17 yesterday against New Hampshire.In the first set, Syracuse found themselves down 10-18 before fighting their way into a 22-20 lead. However, UConn would tie it up at 24 and eventually took the set, 26-24. Syracuse came out strong for the second set and were only down 16-14 before UConn once again pulled away to win the second set, 25-19.But the Orange did not want to go down without a fight. In the third set, down 16-17, Syracuse went on a nine to two run and won the set, 25-19. The fourth set was back and forth, but once SU took a 20-19 lead, it never gave it back up. A powerful kill by Shemanova ended the fourth set with Syracuse ahead, 25-23.The fifth and final set was almost all Orange. Syracuse took a 5-4 lead and didn’t stop, going on to win the game with a 15-7 fifth set victory.Three other SU players finished with double-digit kills. Sophomore Ella Saada had 12, redshirt senior Amber Witherspoon finished with 11 and senior Santita Ebangwese came away with 10.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSyracuse will next head to Milwaukee for the Marquette Tournament on Friday where it will face off against BYU at 6 p.m. Commentscenter_img Published on September 1, 2018 at 6:10 pm Contact Eric: estorms@syr.edulast_img read more