Castroneves Wins Third Indianapolis 500 Title

first_imgBy Dialogo May 26, 2009 Nice article also much informative.Is it magical race as this was the best race of the month. This wasn’t just a race, it was vindication. Helio Castroneves crossed the finish line Sunday beneath an overcast sky at the Indianapolis 500, then loosed enough tears to float his race car another 500 miles down the road. He cried because a third win gained him entry into a charmed circle of champions, only nine of whom have been lucky and courageous enough to capture that many in the 93 times the race has been run. And he cried because the crushing weight of a three-month legal battle with the Internal Revenue Service was finally, unmistakably in his rearview mirror. But mostly, Castroneves cried because his fate once again rested in his own two hands. “You guys don’t understand,” Castroneves roared from the winner’s circle as a 250,000-strong crowd roared back just as loudly. “You guys kept me strong.” A lesser man might have been broken by what Castroneves went through. In March, he was standing trial for federal income tax evasion and looking at six years in prison. He was acquitted, but the final charge against him wasn’t dropped until Friday, two days before the biggest event in his sport. Compared to that ordeal, the race could not have seemed all that taxing. Castroneves grabbed the lead coming out of a restart with 17 laps to go and never faced a serious challenge after that. He started on the pole, played it safe through the middle while ironing out a gearbox problem, then saw his opportunity and grabbed it by the throat. Then just like Rick Mears, one of three four-time Indy 500 champions that Castroneves will train his sights on next, he deployed smarts and patience to choke every last bit of drama out of the race. The resemblance is hardly coincidental. Owner Roger Penske gave both men their shot at the big time and won their loyalty forever. He stood by Castroneves throughout his fight with the IRS and keeps Mears on the payroll as a driving coach and consultant. To no one’s surprise, the two drivers found common ground and became fast friends. “He’s always taken to this place like a duck takes to water,” Mears said. “He’s a competitor, but he’s a big picture guy also. And that’s what it takes … around this place. He’s very good, and what I mean by that is that he rarely puts a wheel wrong around here. He makes very few mistakes.” Both men are masterful in the maelstrom of a race, sifting through clues swirling around them at 220 mph and collecting just enough pieces to solve a tough puzzle. Yet Mears conceded he couldn’t imagine the emotions Castroneves worked through in the quiet moments away from the racetrack, nor the joy he must have felt coming down the home straightaway in front this time. “I know he was just glad to be here. But to have everything fall into place like it did,” Mears said, “is just amazing.” Yet Castroneves’ rivals sensed something different when he returned to the track. The bubbly Brazilian who electrified crowds at Indy Racing League stops and won an international following by waltzing off with the title on “Dancing With The Stars” two seasons ago was noticeably subdued. “Just the kind of hug you get from him” is how IRL glamour girl Danica Patrick described it. “After what he’s gone through, it was a different kind of hug. “So I’m very happy for him,” she added. “We’re glad to have him back, and obviously he’s very good for the sport.” It’s funny how things work out. Just last week, former NFL star Michael Vick walked out of federal prison still vilified and nearly broke, a disgraced former con with no guarantee there will be a place for him in pro football if and when he’s ready to go back. Castroneves, on the other hand, was acquitted, then welcomed back to racing with open arms and the benefit of the doubt. With a quarter of the race left, his sister stood behind Castroneves’ pit, her eyes shut tight and hands clasped in prayer. In short order, Helio’s parents and his girlfriend locked hands and joined the vigil. Given the chance to pick up where he left off, the Brazilian climbed back behind the wheel and wrote the perfect ending to what could have been a Hollywood script. Except that it was all true. “Towards the end,” Castroneves said. “I didn’t touch anything on the car. When I got in the front, it was, ‘Never look back.'” He paused one more time to choke back tears. “This race is magical. It was a tough beginning,” he added, “but this is the best month of May ever.”last_img read more

Carpe Diem! The NCUA deadline for comment on bailout funds merger is here

first_img 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr NCUA headquarters The NCUA has given credit unions a rare opportunity to let the regulator know what they think about its plans for the system’s money.The NCUA proposes to merge the Temporary Corporate Credit Union Stabilization Fund into the National Credit Union Share Insurance Fund and is accepting comments through Tuesday, Sept. 5.Although the merger idea on the surface is a good one, the devil is in the details.The regulator proposes to hold back from credit unions perhaps $1.8 billion of the $2.2 billion to $2.4 billion the corporate bailout fund would be worth at that point.NCUA staff says that would be prudent, protecting the share fund against the liabilities it would take on from the corporate credit union bailout fund. continue reading »last_img read more

Lakers hire Karida Brown as director of racial equity and action

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersA Brown University-educated member in UCLA’s sociology department, Brown has already helped lead a virtual town hall meeting for team employees – her newly created role will extend her partnership with the Lakers. She’s written books and academic papers about Black migration within America, as well as the social dynamics of segregation.“She will play a key role in implementing educational programming on race and racism for our employees and helping us focus on racial equity in our day-to-day functions,” Lakers COO and President of business operations Tim Harris said in a statement, “as well as empowering the organization to identify ways to be more active participants in affecting real change.”The Lakers and the Clippers are using Friday to honor the Juneteenth holiday, which has gained recognition from sports teams (including the Dodgers and Angels) as well as several major companies including Target, Twitter and Nike. The holiday celebrates the liberation of slaves in Texas, who were among the last to know the Civil War had ended in 1865.The Lakers announced several additional recognitions of the Juneteenth holiday, including donating iPads to through four organizations they’ve had existing partnerships with: 4WRD Progress, Watts Skills Academy, Crete Academy and Boys & Girls Clubs of Metro L.A. The donations are meant to address technological inequities experienced by children in communities of color. Lakers employees have been asked to reflect on racial history and the current state of affairs, and the team is offering reading materials and a screening of the film “John Lewis: Good Trouble.”The Clippers have called for employees to sign a petition to make Juneteenth a national holiday. On the eve of Juneteenth, a largely unofficial holiday commemorating the end of slavery in America, the Lakers announced a new official who the team hopes will help address cultural issues within their own walls.The Lakers have tasked Karida Brown, an assistant tenure-track professor of African American Studies and Sociology at UCLA, as the organization’s director of racial equity and action. The team outlined the new position in a release, saying Brown will help “enrich their knowledge on today’s most urgent topics, as well as helping to identify ways the team can be more active and efficient in creating change.”Addressing social and racial issues is being examined across the country right now – particularly in the NBA which is largely composed of Black players. Many of them, including the Lakers’ LeBron James, Avery Bradley, Danny Green, Dwight Howard and Kyle Kuzma, have been vocal about advocating for political and social reform in the wake of the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis.Some players are calling on the league and teams to take more active steps in facilitating those reforms, with Bradley and Howard among those applying pressure ahead of the league’s restart planned for next month. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more