Switzerland to start easing COVID-19 restrictions from April 27

first_img“The transition from one stage to the next will take place when there has been no significant increase in COVID-19 cases,” the government said.”Sufficient time must elapse between each stage to allow the effects of the relaxation to be observed. The criteria are the number of new infections, hospital admissions and deaths, and hospital occupancy rates.”Switzerland has shuttered schools, non-essential shops and many businesses for a month as it sought to halt the epidemic’s spread. It has also extended billions in financial assistance to businesses and eased bankruptcy rules, to prevent companies from going under.Europe should move with extreme caution when considering easing lockdowns, the World Health Organization’s regional director said on Thursday. Topics : The Swiss government will start a gradual relaxation of restrictions brought in to tackle spread of the new coronavirus from April 27, it said on Thursday.Doctors, hairdressers, massage and cosmetics parlors will be the first businesses to be allowed to reopen, it said. This will be followed by compulsory schools, shops and markets from May 11, it added.In a third stage it will reopen secondary schools, vocational schools and universities from June 8. The government also foresees allowing an existing ban of meetings of more than five people to be relaxed, although the details of this stage will be announced at the end of May.center_img The COVID-19 outbreak has so far claimed 973 lives in Switzerland, although the rate of positive tests has slowed in recent days.Neighboring Austria has already announced a partial exit from its own lockdown, while Germany has announced its own small steps out of the lockdown.last_img read more

Big switch from capital to family suburb for pair

first_imgThe outdoor area at 651 Jesmond Rd, Fig Tree Pocket.Ms Lammie said Fig Tree Pocket was a family-orientated suburb.“There’s that really old-fashioned childhood feeling to it,” she said. “People ride horses, children can ride their bikes and the location is great; it’s so close to good schools.” 651 Jesmond Rd, Fig Tree Pocket.A young couple who relocated from Canberra will now call Fig Tree Pocket home.The couple bought the spacious five-bedroom, three-bathroom home at 651 Jesmond Rd for $1.62 million.Cathy Lammie Property selling agent Cathy Lammie said the couple were set to move into their new home last weekend. 651 Jesmond Rd, Fig Tree Pocket.More from newsDigital inspection tool proves a property boon for REA website3 Apr 2020The Camira homestead where kids roamed free28 May 2019Ms Lammie said award-winning Tabrizi Homes created the stunning masterpiece.She said she received three written offers for the property. The home features a media room, a room downstairs perfect for when guests stay, and a swimming pool ideal for the summer months.center_img The kitchen area at 651 Jesmond Rd, Fig Tree Pocket.Ms Lammie said the property was across the road from acres of parkland and just a three-minute walk from Fig Tree Pocket State School.The property, only 10km to the CBD, is also close to Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary.last_img read more

Detransitioners: Girls who became boys who want to be girls again

first_imgStuff co.nz 19 November 2019Family First Comment: There is plenty of help available for people who want to transition – but precious little for those who then change their minds. There is so little acknowledgement that not everyone who transitions remains aligned with the opposite sex that Keira cannot easily undo her gender recognition certificate, which leaves her as legally male; she would have to apply for another one to transition back to her birth sex. “There’s a lack of interest in detransitioner studies and outcomes and data, because it doesn’t really suit the people pushing this ideology to know about the bad outcomes.”Keira attended the Gender Identity Development Service at London’s Tavistock and Portman Trust, the only NHS facility for transgender young people.She says that when she was 16, after just three appointments, she was referred to an endocrinologist for puberty-blockers. Prescribed to “press pause” on puberty for children distressed by their developing bodies, the hormones do, however, carry health risks, including to bone density and cognitive development.For Keira, who had already started puberty, the effect was to halt future development and stop her periods. She then moved on to cross-sex hormones – testosterone for women transitioning, oestrogen for males – and appointments at the adult clinic at Charing Cross Hospital in London.Her voice deepened, she developed body hair and grew a beard. At the age of 21, she had her breasts removed. After realising her mistake, Keira had her last testosterone injection at the start of this year – yet she is still having to shave and is routinely mistaken for a man.It is not just a permanently lowered voice that is the legacy of Keira’s foray into gender reassignment, however. “I am so angry and I can’t see that going away,” she says. “Nothing was explored that may have better explained the way I felt about myself than that it must have meant I was born in the wrong body.”She describes an unhappy childhood, deeply affected by her parents’ divorce and her mother’s alcoholism, leading her to retreat into a world where being a boy felt like it offered escape.Now, she says, “I feel sick, I feel like I’ve been lied to. There’s no evidence for the treatments I’ve had, and they didn’t make me feel any better. It was maturity that did that.”Her view is echoed by Sue Evans, a psychoanalyst who used to work at the Tavistock and is now crowdfunding to bring a test case against the trust to establish that children cannot give their informed consent to what she describes as radical, experimental treatment.Evans will be speaking about her case at the Detransition Advocacy Network’s first event in Manchester at the end of the month. However, there is as yet no data on the number of people unhappy in their new gender, or those who are seeking to detransition.“I’m about the science, the research and evidence-based good practice in medicine,” says Evans. “And it just doesn’t exist when it comes to how we treat trans patients.“This has been moved out of the medical domain and has become political and ideological,” she adds. “But the problem is it absolutely is a medical issue, because you’re about to launch people on a pathway that chemically and medically interferes with the basis of their body, who they are and their identity.”There is plenty of help available for people who want to transition – but precious little for those who then change their minds.There is so little acknowledgement that not everyone who transitions remains aligned with the opposite sex that Keira cannot easily undo her gender recognition certificate, which leaves her as legally male; she would have to apply for another one to transition back to her birth sex.“There’s a lack of interest in detransitioner studies and outcomes and data, because it doesn’t really suit the people pushing this ideology to know about the bad outcomes,” says Evans.“Part of the trans message is, you’re the consumer, you make a choice about your gender and we will curate a body for you to fit in with your requirements,” she continues. “Detransitioners are the rejects who go into the seconds shop. They’re not the good examples from the production line of bodies that transition. In a sense, they’re the damaged goods no one wants to acknowledge.”READ MORE: https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/117553613/detransitioners-girls-who-became-boys-who-want-to-be-girls-again?fbclid=IwAR0hJua3FsJaxcmyGN3S-w4MLWKY7EG5k_FoVSExvIeVtwJJz3nkL2X-mEMlast_img read more

Cardiff reach Langston resolution

first_img Press Association Cardiff owner Vincent Tan had stated he was confident of reaching an agreement after holding talks with Hammam, and a deal has now been struck. It is believed Cardiff agreed to pay a one-off lump sum and a schedule of further, smaller payments. Tan said: “I am grateful and indebted to Sam Hammam, Michael Isaac and Michael Filiou for their part in this resolution, which brings to a close a lengthy period of uncertainty. “This settlement allows us to look to a new era of financial stability, which should be celebrated by all connected to Cardiff City. “I am delighted, primarily for the supporters of this great club that we can put this matter firmly behind us and plan for our future with confidence.” Hammam will become an honorary life president of the club, while his representative Filiou has taken a place on the board. “This resolution will rightly be regarded as a proud and historic occasion for all associated with Cardiff City Football Club,” said Hammam. “Now that an amicable agreement has been reached, thanks in most part to the vision of Tan Sri Vincent Tan and the important role of Michael Isaac and Michael Filiou, the club can now focus on the exciting Premier League season ahead, while building for the future with optimism.” Tan claimed last week that once an agreement with Langston was secured he would look to convert the substantial amount he is owed by the club into equity in order to ensure Cardiff become debt free. The debt to Swiss-based financial company Langston, of whom former Bluebirds chief Sam Hammam is a representative, was taken out in 2004 and was believed to be worth £24million. Cardiff’s most recent financial figures showed the club were £83million in debt. center_img Cardiff have reached an “amicable resolution” with creditors Langston Corporation over the club’s longstanding debt.last_img read more