BLOG: Pennsylvania Has a Fair Funding Formula: Sorry, Delaware and North Carolina

first_imgBLOG: Pennsylvania Has a Fair Funding Formula: Sorry, Delaware and North Carolina Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf SHARE Email Facebook Twitter By: J.J. Abbott, Deputy Press Secretary center_img June 02, 2016 Education,  Schools That Teach,  The Blog,  Videos A landmark report in 2013 revealed a stark ranking for Pennsylvania: we were one of only three states without a funding formula to fairly, equitably and adequately distribute new funding to school districts.This week, Governor Tom Wolf signed Pennsylvania’s fair funding formula into law.And that leaves Delaware and North Carolina alone as states without a fair funding formula.While this is a victory for students, their parents, teachers and school administrators, it is not a singular or quick fix.As Governor Wolf has pointed out and education advocates have pushed, in order for the formula to work, the General Assembly must allocate more money for our schools.Only more funding, not the formula alone can solve another ranking problem for the commonwealth: A ranking of states regarding school-funding equity found Pennsylvania in 47th place.As Governor Wolf works toward a final 2016-2017 budget, he will be fighting to push more funding out so Pennsylvania’s schools can start to move forward.last_img read more

Women with multiple partners more likely to experience stress and depression

first_imgChild & Family blog.com May 2016Family First Comment:  “Mothers with children conceived by multiple partners were more likely to be depressed both around the birth of the child and two years later…“Depression around the birth of the child correlated with the degree of involvement of the biological father.Women with children by multiple partners are more likely to experience stress and depression compared with mothers whose children share the same father.Paula Fomby at the University of Michigan looked at 3,366 families included in the Fragile Families Child and Wellbeing Study. The families included children who were born between 1998 and 2000 in a number of US cities.Fomby compared mothers who went on to have another child by a new partner within the next three years with mothers who had another child with the same partner or who had no further children.Mothers with multiple partners were likely to receive less social support and less child support from the biological father. Children were likely to have less contact with their biological fathers, and the relationship between the mother and the biological fathers was likely to be poorer.Mothers with children conceived by multiple partners were more likely to be depressed both around the birth of the child and two years later. A mother of a three-year-old with another child by a different partner was 43% more likely to have had a major depressive episode in the past year compared to women who had no further children.Fomby found that depression around the birth of the child correlated with the degree of involvement of the biological father. Two years later, the main correlation was with what Fomby calls “boundary ambiguity” in the family, such as the presence of the new partner’s earlier children in the household and family activities involving both biological and step-father at the same time.READ MORE: https://childandfamilyblog.com/women-multiple-partners/last_img read more